Notices
Results 1 to 18 of 18
Like Tree3Likes
  • 1 Post By RedPanda
  • 1 Post By grmpysmrf
  • 1 Post By Implicate Order

Thread: goldilocks zone

  1. #1 goldilocks zone 
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    200
    Will it be ever possible to colonise planets of other stars well beyond the Goldilocks Zone?


    believer in ahimsa
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Flatland
    Posts
    5,438
    Depends upon the planet and our technological level. Life as we know it requires certain conditions to form. If those conditions aren't met, we generally assume no life exists there, but that doesn't mean life which formed elsewhere cannot migrate there and survive by using its technology.


    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Professor Daecon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,276
    If we have enough power to generate a constant supply of heat and light, and access to H2O, then theoretically we'd be able to sustain an ecosystem.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    2,408
    The first problem to solve would be getting there.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    ▼▼ dn ʎɐʍ sıɥʇ ▼▼ RedPanda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,737
    Quote Originally Posted by dan hunter View Post
    The first problem to solve would be getting there.
    And then we would need to sort out a decent internet connection.
    dan hunter likes this.
    SayBigWords.com/say/3FC

    "And, behold, I come quickly;" Revelation 22:12

    "Religions are like sausages. When you know how they are made, you no longer want them."
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    not ADM!N grmpysmrf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,564
    if there was a way to convert radiation into heat we could probably colonize some of the moons of the gas giants... Maybe... Don't yell at me.
    dan hunter likes this.
    "Should any political party attempt to abolish social security, unemployment insurance and eliminate labor laws and farm programs, you would not hear of that party again in our political history. There is a tiny splinter group, of course, that believes that you can do these things. Among them are a few Texas oil millionaires, and an occasional politician or businessman from other areas. Their number is negligible and they are stupid."
    President Dwight Eisenhower
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,318
    Quote Originally Posted by parag29081973 View Post
    Will it be ever possible to colonise planets of other stars well beyond the Goldilocks Zone?
    Don't really see the importance unless the intention is to terraform the planet some time in the future--as we might do with Mars.

    The only other thing preventing us from outer solar system colonization will probably having good reasons to go there.
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    “The Holy Land is everywhere” Black Elk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Masters Degree Implicate Order's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    27.4679° S, 153.0278° E
    Posts
    610
    Quote Originally Posted by parag29081973 View Post
    Will it be ever possible to colonise planets of other stars well beyond the Goldilocks Zone?
    Assuming the technological pace can continue and there are no devastating consequences to the human race while we infest (/tic) this planet, I think it's inevitable that we ultimately will colonize other planets and progressively extend our biohabitat throughout the galaxy and beyond.

    Initially I would assume that the distance of travel and speed would be addressed through technological way points such as space stations for refuelling and re-supply. I would assume that closer (colder) planets/ moons would be colonized first to keep manageable distances between supply chains. Artifical biohabitats would likely be created first until terraforming abilities improve and then these temporary structures used as a base to commence terraforming processes.

    As terraforming skills improve I wouldn't be surprised if we commenced programs of seeding distant planets prior to arrival. For example, highly durable and resistant probes directed towards potential targets filled with resistant spores containing extremophiles etc. that could be released to possibly kick-start an ecosystem.

    If the human species lives long enough, then I assume it is only a matter of time. This pale blue dot is starting to get 'stinky'. :-))
    Ascended likes this.
    Quidquid latine dictum, altum videtur
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    84
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by parag29081973 View Post
    Will it be ever possible to colonise planets of other stars well beyond the Goldilocks Zone?
    Don't really see the importance unless the intention is to terraform the planet some time in the future--as we might do with Mars.

    The only other thing preventing us from outer solar system colonization will probably having good reasons to go there.
    and speed lols
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Masters Degree
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    719
    I'd be amazed if we ever manage to successfully colonise near space - beyond purely Earth funded, built and operated enterprises for purely Earth based interests and purposes - let alone colonise a planet as inherently inhospitable as Mars. And interstellar colonies? That goes beyond unbridled optimism into pure fantasy.

    In space everything is difficult and dangerous and expensive. The minimum requirements, for a select handful to simply to breathe and eat, are tech levels only available to large, successful economies. If we don't sort out our sustainability problems here on Earth, where fresh water falls from the sky and vegetation grows so well that restraining it is often more problematic than creating the circumstances for it to survive at all, then the economic base for moving beyond some satellites and an orbital laboratory will never develop.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Forum Professor Daecon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,276
    We should probably practise with trying to colonise current terrestrial inhospitable environments such as the poles, the middle of a desert or even underwater?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Forum Masters Degree
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    719
    Quote Originally Posted by Daecon View Post
    We should probably practise with trying to colonise current terrestrial inhospitable environments such as the poles, the middle of a desert or even underwater?
    These places would be far more easily colonised than the Moon or Mars IMO. Asteroids and comets have an abundance of some but not all kinds of valuable and essential resources, however the value of gravity in economically processing them should not be underrated. Nuclear power would be a minimum technology and fissionable elements in any concentrated ores are going to be hard to come by; here on Earth concentrations occur as a result of geothermal and hydrothermal processes. Fusion? So far the combined efforts of the largest and most advanced nations has failed to deliver it and I would be very surprised if it ever gets boiled down to the kinds of mass production that is reproduceable without the breadth and depth of technological expertise large and well run global economies can achieve. How many individual specialties exist to sustain a modern economy?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    8,046
    Venus is the best option overall. It already has an atmosphere, though admittedly a highly toxic and corrosive one, but most importantly - it has very nearly the same gravity as Earth.

    In (wildly speculative) theory, Venus' atmosphere could be transformed over a long period of time using the right algae. If we can get its ozone levels right, and put enough of the right chemicals in the upper atmosphere to protect against sunlight - it *could* become a nice place to live.

    We can't colonize low gravity environments unless we can find a way to solve the bone loss problem. So the Moon, Mars, and larger moons of Jupiter and Saturn are only possible colonies if a medical procedure is devised that will preserve the colonists' bone mass despite the low gravity.
    Some clocks are only right twice a day, but they are still right when they are right.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    8,318
    Quote Originally Posted by kojax View Post
    We can't colonize low gravity environments unless we can find a way to solve the bone loss problem. So the Moon, Mars, and larger moons of Jupiter and Saturn are only possible colonies if a medical procedure is devised that will preserve the colonists' bone mass despite the low gravity.
    We already have engineering solutions for bone loss that could be as simple as an inclined rail system of sleeper and exercise cars running on a circular track set to 1G acceleration. That would be much easier than the many centuries trying to terraform Venus.
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
    “The Holy Land is everywhere” Black Elk
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    200
    I was thinking on anti-particles which would by some engineering process make us rooted on the surface we walk OR maybe dark matter and gravity stratification OR.. well I am only imagining I think (please pardon me if I am being too imaginative).
    believer in ahimsa
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #16  
    Forum Professor Daecon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,276
    Quote Originally Posted by parag29081973 View Post
    I was thinking on anti-particles which would by some engineering process make us rooted on the surface we walk OR maybe dark matter and gravity stratification OR.. well I am only imagining I think (please pardon me if I am being too imaginative).
    Unfortunately those things don't make sense. Antiparticles would simply explode on contact with non-antiparticles. Dark Matter hasn't actually been found and identified, it's just a "best guess" to explain an observation at the moment.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  18. #17  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    16,585
    Quote Originally Posted by parag29081973 View Post
    I was thinking on anti-particles which would by some engineering process make us rooted on the surface we walk OR maybe dark matter and gravity stratification OR.. well I am only imagining I think (please pardon me if I am being too imaginative).
    I'm not sure why you would need any of those things. An Earth-like, habitable planet would (almost by definition) have similar gravity to Earth that would keep us "rooted on the surface".
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
    Reply With Quote  
     

  19. #18  
    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK
    Posts
    4,486
    Quote Originally Posted by parag29081973 View Post
    I was thinking on anti-particles which would by some engineering process make us rooted on the surface we walk OR maybe dark matter and gravity stratification OR.. well I am only imagining I think (please pardon me if I am being too imaginative).
    Imagination is fine, what you have done, however, is string together completely unrelated science buzz-words into an incoherent mess. Why don't you try and learn some science before exercising your imagination? Trust me, it's a lot more interesting than the stuff you seem to be happy making up (and it is also based in reality - another plus point).
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Is there a space/zone where the Universe Is?
    By roggies87 in forum Astronomy & Cosmology
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: September 4th, 2013, 12:22 AM
  2. How about a Fun zone
    By Ascended in forum Site Feedback
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: May 26th, 2012, 01:54 PM
  3. Goldilocks and Global Warming
    By The Finger Prince in forum Environmental Issues
    Replies: 131
    Last Post: January 13th, 2012, 01:05 AM
  4. Calculating the Habitable zone.
    By Martian_Monkey in forum Astronomy & Cosmology
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: February 19th, 2010, 02:32 PM
  5. Life-Zone
    By Kolt in forum Biology
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: April 23rd, 2007, 07:02 PM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •