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Thread: Sci-Fi Your Way Out Of Dumping Your Clothes In Zero G...

  1. #1 Sci-Fi Your Way Out Of Dumping Your Clothes In Zero G... 
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    Currently astronauts in zero G dump their clothes once they get too smelly because of sweat. Washing machines aren't viable because of zero G issues mostly.

    So sci-fi your way out of this! How can you make clothing reusuable in a zero G environment?

    One way is this: Use steam to clean your clothing. Viable but still uses up precious water. But if your sci-fied up enough, getting ressupplied with water in orbit of a planet should be easy.

    Another Way: What if your in deep space in zero G? Forget the planetary shipments. How about metal armor plating for clothes? Flexible joints on it where needed, including chain links? Once your metal armor gets sticky and smelly, just throw it in the hot room on your ship and let all the junk be burned off. A sufficient heater/cooler system on your ship should only make you wait 5 minutes for your armor clothes while your naked and waiting.

    I wonder about the comfort issues, but I tend to think that the benefits might outweigh it here because of the reusability.

    So, can you think of other ways? And what do you think of these?

    As for trolls, (and you know who you are) don't expect me to respond to your hate.


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  3. #2  
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    Interesting question.

    There are no astronauts in deep space. If there is eventually a trip to Mars, comfort and sanity will be paramount. It's hard enough to sit on a plane for 8 hours...let alone a spacecraft for 6 months wearing metal clothes. Comfort means sanity.


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    1. THE FUTURE OF LAUNDARY ISWATERLESS WASHING MACHINE BY: JYOTI KUMARI NAVNEET BISHT RAHUL KUMAR RUPESH KUMAR


    2. About Xeros Ltd. Xeros Ltd. is a new company focused on the development of "virtually waterless" laundry cleaning. Harnessing over 30 years of research by Professor Stephen Burkinshaw and the University ofLeeds, Xeros is the brand name for a patented polymer based cleaning that creates step change advantage in the cost and environmental impact of aqueous wash cleaning. The team are based at laboratories in Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK and led by CEO, Bill Westwater. Partnerships Xeros has an ongoing partnership with the University of Leeds and their team of world-class polymer scientists. They have also created further industrial partnerships to help them optimizing the technology and prepare products for market.


    3. OBJECTIVEThe objective of implementing is that as we see many countries are facing the utmost problem of water especially the country like India has recognized the need for it & thus got the machine which is beneficial in many aspects like costs, electricity, water & many more. Likewise the country wants to make the awareness in many countries like Zimbabwe, china & many more.


    4. WATER SCARCITY Water scarcity in urban areas is of particular concern because of migration of the rural population to urban centres resulting in towns and cities expanding rapidly Water scarcity can result from a variety of causes but principally either source limitation, poor distribution, or inequality between the rich and the poor. What happens when there is a lack of water is all to apparent in many developing country cities ◦ Increase the health burden on the urban poor, who often constitute the very labour source that generates the cities wealth.
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  5. #4  
    Anti-Crank AlexG's Avatar
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    Hang the cloths for a while in vacuum. See what that would do.
    Its the way nature is!
    If you dont like it, go somewhere else....
    To another universe, where the rules are simpler
    Philosophically more pleasing, more psychologically easy
    Prof Richard Feynman (1979) .....

    Das ist nicht nur nicht richtig, es ist nicht einmal falsch!"
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorbo View Post
    Currently astronauts in zero G dump their clothes once they get too smelly because of sweat. Washing machines aren't viable because of zero G issues mostly.
    Why wouldn't a washing machine work? The source of water might be an issue, but given enough water it seems like it would be a piece of cake. Add clothes, water and soap and wash normally. Spin cycle to extract water. Then either recover water from the periphery of the machine or just open the washing machine to vacuum. Water boils away and you are left with dry clothes.
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by billvon View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by lorbo View Post
    Currently astronauts in zero G dump their clothes once they get too smelly because of sweat. Washing machines aren't viable because of zero G issues mostly.
    Why wouldn't a washing machine work? The source of water might be an issue, but given enough water it seems like it would be a piece of cake. Add clothes, water and soap and wash normally. Spin cycle to extract water. Then either recover water from the periphery of the machine or just open the washing machine to vacuum. Water boils away and you are left with dry clothes.
    A few issues actually:

    1. Water is like glue in zero G unless you have some suction. Look at Chris Hadfield wringing out a wet towel. The water sticks to his hands like glue. As for soap and water, that is fine, so long you don't wanna recycle that water, since I don't know how soapy water can be made into drinkable water (astronauts loove to recycle their waste water). Now you could use the vacuum of space to dry out your clothes, but then you expose you clothes to the radiation of space, which you don't want on your skin.

    I don't hate your idea, I just see that there are some possible obstacles in the way.

    I think cloth clothing has it's place, but it would only be for special occasions during long duration space missions.
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorbo View Post
    1. Water is like glue in zero G unless you have some suction.
    Right; that's a good thing. It means the water wets the fabric. When you spin it you create "gravity" to separate the water from the clothes, as in a normal washing machine.
    As for soap and water, that is fine, so long you don't wanna recycle that water, since I don't know how soapy water can be made into drinkable water (astronauts loove to recycle their waste water).
    Use biodegradable soap then route the water to the farm. Farm filters it (and plants use the soap as fertilizer) and you reuse the water. Alternatively just let it evaporate then recover the water with a condenser. Alternatively #2 distill it.
    Now you could use the vacuum of space to dry out your clothes, but then you expose you clothes to the radiation of space, which you don't want on your skin.
    ?? Just open a valve between the washing machine and the outside. No radiation.
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by billvon View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by lorbo View Post
    1. Water is like glue in zero G unless you have some suction.
    Right; that's a good thing. It means the water wets the fabric. When you spin it you create "gravity" to separate the water from the clothes, as in a normal washing machine.
    As for soap and water, that is fine, so long you don't wanna recycle that water, since I don't know how soapy water can be made into drinkable water (astronauts loove to recycle their waste water).
    Use biodegradable soap then route the water to the farm. Farm filters it (and plants use the soap as fertilizer) and you reuse the water. Alternatively just let it evaporate then recover the water with a condenser. Alternatively #2 distill it.
    Now you could use the vacuum of space to dry out your clothes, but then you expose you clothes to the radiation of space, which you don't want on your skin.
    ?? Just open a valve between the washing machine and the outside. No radiation.
    So basically, a ship with this stuff would be rather big one (if your going the farm route). Really any ship that will be carrying water for washing clothes had better be a big one. I suppose you could distill soapy water, but I don't know what the process involves. I would wager that zero G makes it more difficult though.

    If you let the soapy water evaporate the soap would stick up the walls. So at least one room would have a film of sticky soap all over the walls. But it would be viable I suppose.
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  10. #9  
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    Or you could go the handwavy route:

    Sci-fi Organic clothing: Made of organic vines that absorb body and dead skin. The vines convert it into cool temperature, meaning you will always be cool wearing the vine suit. Also you will never get full of body sweat wearing it nor dead skin cells. In other words you would never have to wipe your body clean while wearing it (except for when you pooped). It would be perfect. The only thing you would have to wash is your face.

    Since there is no dirt in space, dead skin and sweat are the only things to dirty up your clothes in zero g environments.
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorbo View Post
    Since there is no dirt in space, dead skin and sweat are the only things to dirty up your clothes in zero g environments.
    ?? Space will tend to be as dirty as any other non-ground human vehicle is (boats, aircraft etc.) Grease, dust, grime etc.
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by billvon View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by lorbo View Post
    Since there is no dirt in space, dead skin and sweat are the only things to dirty up your clothes in zero g environments.
    ?? Space will tend to be as dirty as any other non-ground human vehicle is (boats, aircraft etc.) Grease, dust, grime etc.
    Here is an astronaut washing clothes in space. It's a chore to say the least doing it by hand.

    How to wash clothes at the International Space Station - YouTube
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  13. #12  
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    Don't wear clothes.
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    The clothing is actually composed of a forcefield. The hardware is stored in your dog tags. It is self-powered, programable, semi-autonomous, and capable of on the fly modifications as to which molecules can safely pass through the field in either direction. Other molecules can only pass one way.
    Inside it is standard clothing, the force field can manipulate light to give you any fashion you want. Outside, or during a hull breach, it's your space suit. Other times, body armor.

    Dirt, spills, anything that can dirty your clothes, are just repelled and slide off. On the inside, sweat, excess moisture, dead skin cells, etc., are pushed thru the field and expelled.
    Not only do you never have to clean it, you rarely have to bath, saving more water.
    Two dog tags, The primary, and a backup.

    Oh, and your mandatory nose ring, is actually a self powered micro replicator, capable of producing breathable air, plus a variety of inhaled medicines on demand. All body equipment, dog tags, nose ring, sub dermal communicator, etc, can communicate with each other, can share power sources, and on a limited basis compensate for damaged units.
    Last edited by vrsnake; December 22nd, 2013 at 02:45 AM. Reason: spelling, carification
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  15. #14  
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    One of those Soviet stations featured a sort of shower stall, which the cosmonauts agreed so superfluous they had to be commanded to use it. Apparently when cooped up like that people grow insensitive to body odors.

    Patting damp clothes with a dry towel doesn't work so well as wringing the clothing and towel together. ISS should hire a few grannies as domestic advisers.

    Soapy water is a problem. Instead use biodegradable laundry enzymes, that allow recycle of the grey-water through the human body. Just boil and flavour strongly before drinking.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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  16. #15  
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    Quote Originally Posted by vrsnake View Post
    Dirt, spills, anything that can dirty your clothes, are just repelled and slide off. On the inside, sweat, excess moisture, dead skin cells, etc., are pushed thru the field and expelled.
    Your entire epidermis is dead skin cells.

    Ouch.
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  17. #16  
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    Hmm, so they get wet with sweat? What about ultrasonic drying:
    Humidifier - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    To get the water out of the clothes, coupled with "space dehumidifier". (which I hence invent) that works like a normal dehumidifier - a cold plate that attracts moisture through condensation - except inside a centrifuge, so the water actually rolls off the condensor. Then the clothes are dry, although covered in sweat stink. But that's what Febreeze is for.
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