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Thread: How to become a writer? The formal stuff is killing me

  1. #1 How to become a writer? The formal stuff is killing me 
    Forum Ph.D. Raziell's Avatar
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    So... lets say you wrote a book that - if published would become a great success.

    How would you do all the formal stuff?

    I read that 19 out of 20 books that are written arent published, truth?

    If you have no money yourself how to copyright your book, and where/what to do? Will you have to find a person that likes it and will invest in it being published that would take a percentage of the earnings? Or do you send the book to a publisher where someone reads it and then judges "Yay" or "Nay"?

    My friends and family says i have a vivid imagination and ive wrote some ideas for books in the catagory science fiction and dark fantasy that i want to write but im scared allready now that my ideas will get stolen and/or that i wont get it published.


    A lie is a lie even if everyone believes it. The truth is the truth even if nobody believes it. - David Stevens
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  3. #2  
    Forum Professor jrmonroe's Avatar
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    Compared to patenting a device, copyrighting a work (non-fiction, novel, play, music score, lyrics, poems, etc) is a piece of cake. There's a rudimentary form of copyright in which (I think) you simply write on your work:

    Copyright 2010
    by Razell Dazell
    All Rights Reserved.


    and you also give some sort of contact info, typical a mailing or physical address.

    (Similar to what they do at the bottom of many webpages, including this one.)

    Then there's the official kind of copyright where you send two copies of your work to (I think) the United States Copyright Office plus some reasonable fee and most likely a submission form.

    Getting it published is another matter. With your material copyrighted, you can send it with peace of mind to publishing houses who publish such material. They will have an editor read it and either "accept" or "reject" it. There's a standard process for doing this. They want it in a certain format, etc (for example, double-spaced, single-sided 811 bound pages), which is easy to do by reformatting your computer version of it. Don't be surprised if you spend up to a ream of paper on each copy. I think the process typically includes a return envelope with sufficient postage. Apart from the investment of your time and energy writing your works, this is probably the most expensive part of the whole process.


    Grief is the price we pay for love. (CM Parkes) Our postillion has been struck by lightning. (Unknown) War is always the choice of the chosen who will not have to fight. (Bono) The years tell much what the days never knew. (RW Emerson) Reality is not always probable, or likely. (JL Borges)
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    Forum Ph.D. Raziell's Avatar
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    Thanks Monroe
    A lie is a lie even if everyone believes it. The truth is the truth even if nobody believes it. - David Stevens
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  5. #4  
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    This is what I'm looking into for a book of my own:
    http://www.ehow.com/how_5060044_publ...paign=yssp_art

    A lot of it is freeware or DIY. Good luck!
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  6. #5  
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    Getting SF published is difficult, not only because the market is saturated with writers, but because SF is on the decline right now. Fantasy sells these days, not so much SF.

    You could do the self published route, but rarely do any success stories come out of those markets. You could also blanket-bomb publishers, but their slush piles are only growing these days, not shrinking, and its unlikely anyone would ever publish a novel length work by an untested author. The traditional way is to get a few short stories published in the magazines, then get an agent, then submit your manuscript through him or her.

    As to copyright, you don't even need to mark your document as such. It is copyrighted by the fact that it came out of your head. But if someone ever plagiarizes you will have to prove that you came up with the ideas first. I suggest mailing yourself a copy of your manuscript that you never open. That way the postmark will be some objective proof that supports your claim. Write your name across the seam, too.
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