Notices
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Fractal memory stored in the genes

  1. #1 Fractal memory stored in the genes 
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,120
    A recent ponderance of mine (about a year old) has been that genes store fractal memories, both relating to evolution re all the steps back to our genetic ancestors origins and also re experiences. It seems to me that fractals are a type of language and everything, material and immaterial can be represented by them in 'form'. I think that it is these fractal memories stored in the genes that direct evolution.

    I think it could also explain things of a pseudoscientific nature such as alleged 'past life' memories and transplant memories etc.

    Meanwhile re 'evidence of fractal memory' in animals

    Bees create hives which are mathematically correct structures and 'fractals'. I am suggesting that the knowledge of the mathematical requirements of building the hive is stored in their genes as 'fractal memory'. If not 'genetic memory' then how does this knowledge pass from parent to offspring?

    Most animals have innate knowledge...how does 'innate' work if not via the genes? Innate knowledge must surely be stored as memory in the genes?

    My uneducated explanation (and please excuse if me if this is old news and I'm stating the obvious) is that evolution starts with the simplest fractal and as things became more complex, so did fractals. I beleive all living things have stored within their genes the genetic fractal memory of every earlier fractal development that their species went through.

    I believe all things can in the end be presented in fractals. It's a language if you like.

    Everything in this universe, material and not can be represented in form by a fractal.

    Thus fractal memory is 'everything' memory. Events etc. Memory of our genetic ancestors.

    I think that the fractal gene memory that I speak of here is what prompts evolutionary change.

    Ie. The genes are aware of the events of the hosts life and make changes accordingly for the benefit of the offspring. Note the 'awareness' is not conscious awareness as we understand it but the same type of 'automatic' functioning we see in robots which make 'corrections' to their behaviour when they bump into things.

    We 'humans' have problems seeing events in terms of maths or 'fractals' because of our 'perception' but in reality it is just 'maths', so not all that bizarre that the gene which is a fine tuned computer can make adjustments in it's 'output' based on the 'input' .

    Think of this entire world as a digital programme and it all makes sense. Evolution is a software update and nothing more than that.

    NOTE:

    On googling fractal memory, I found this:

    http://www.vanderbilt.edu/AnS/psycho...6-FracMem.html


    "From a Darwinian perspective, we propose that our sensory
    receptors evolved in the presence of fractal objects, bathed in and
    powerfully shaped by them. It makes sense to us, then, that fractal
    geometry should be adopted in the study of perception and memory for
    visual form (cf. Gilden, Schmuckler, & Clayton, 1993). Yet contemporary
    psychophysical studies of perception are dominated by Euclidean measures,
    and modern theories of visual form, such as Biederman's (1987) object
    recognition theory, have Euclidean objects (spheres, cubes, etc.) as
    primitives ("geons")."


    So Genes storing fractal memory is nolonger 'far out'?


    'Time is the space between birth and death' by me.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,120
    I just found this too, re genes and memory

    http://www.this-magic-sea.com/GENES.HTM

    "Genes are memories. Memories of how to behave. Yes, memories of how to make proteins, but also memories of how the whole cell and even the whole organism should behave in certain conditions. Recent discoveries in the embyonic development of the brain adds strong support to this view. The basic patterns of our brains are organized by a kind of cellular singing, and it is difficult to imagine the chant emanating from DNA other than as a memory.

    Memories, like genes, are not limited to a single cell somewhere, but are emergent. Like mind, involving lots of cells doing things together that none of them could do alone. Like chanting up patterns of behavior, ways of communicating, coordinating, responding, observing. Ways to be aware together, to be conscious.

    Memories exist - as does everything - as information passes through the webs of communications. They come into being, they appear, they emerge, as transcriptase molecules "read" the coding of the DNA molecules. DNA not read is like a book that is not read. The ideas do not exist until somebody reads them and can understand them.

    Memories read from the DNA spread as communications between RNA molecules and Ribosomes - become modified and retransmitted by the cellular organelles and this then modifies how the whole cell responds to information from its environment and what it will communicate to the other cells in its web of communications."


    'Time is the space between birth and death' by me.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3 More of fractal evolution 
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,120
    More on fractal evolution from the web!

    "Today, any graduate student asked to develop a paper on the subject of design in nature would invariably wind up looking into fractal geometry and mathematics. Fractal geometry, as its name implies, is a geometry focusing on the description of geometrical structures, and structuring, in fract[ion]al space. This branch of mathematics was developed in 1975.

    The Elements of Euclid (circa 300 BC) summarised in thirteen volumes the mathematical knowledge of ancient Greece. Up to the 20th century, Euclid's books of geometry were taken as the final, authoritative word on the subject. They dealt with whole rather than fractional realities. Plane geometry concerns planar (one- and two- dimensional) structures, and solid geometry describes volumetric (three-dimensional) structures.

    Science writer and author James Gleick said new geometries occur when someone changes a fundamental supposition. He wrote: "Suppose space can be curved instead of flat, a geometer says, and the result is a weird curved parody of Euclid that provides precisely the right framework for the general theory of relativity. Suppose space can have four dimensions, or five, or six. Suppose the number-expressing dimension can be a fraction. Suppose shapes are defined, not by solving an equation once, but by iterating it [repeating it] in a feedback loop."

    French mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot made a number of the above suppositions, and the result was the 1975 birth of "fractal" (fractional) geometry and mathematics (Les Objets Fractal). The original stimulus behind Mandelbrot's work was an interest in irregular (seemingly "chaotic") patterns. Cotton prices over long periods of time, frequency of earthquakes, flooding conditions - all seemed to occur with a regular irregularity. What was the principle of order within the chaos?

    Mandelbrot's "studies of irregular patterns," Gleick indicates, "and his exploration of infinitely complex shapes had an intellectual intersection: a quality of self-similarity. Above all, fractal meant self-similar... Self-similarity is symmetry across scale. It implies recursion, pattern inside of pattern. Mandelbrot's price charts and river charts displayed self-similarity, because not only did they produce detail at finer and finer scales, they also produced detail with certain constant measurements..."
    The physical world, the explicate realm, is structured along the lines of fractal geometry.

    The basic underlying idea is that of repetition of structure in different scales of magnitude. The common example is a coastline: a photograph of a section of coastline from a blimp will show the same ragged contours as a photograph of the whole coast taken from a space station. A photograph of a one-foot-long section of the same coast will also show the same contours. The various coastlines are "self-similar, each like the others in shape, but different in magnitude."

    Mandelbrot and those who took up the tools he provided found endless evidence of the fact that the explicate realm is designed via fractal mathematics. In light of this, the idea of Mayr and other Darwinists that the perfections of nature are the result of "planlessness" was revealed as artless. The physical realm is structured like "Chinese eggs," eggs nested within eggs.

    "A decade after Mandelbrot published his physiological speculations," Gleick writes, "some theoretical biologists began to find fractal organisation controlling structures all through the body. The standard "exponential" description of bronchial branching proved to be quite wrong; a fractal description turned out to fit the data. The urinary collecting system proved fractal. The biliary duct in the liver. The network of special fibres in the heart that carry pulses of electric current to the contracting muscles...."

    "How did nature manage to evolve such complicated architecture?" Gleick asks. "Mandelbrot's point is that the complications exist only in the context of traditional Euclidean geometry. As fractals, branching structures can be described with transparent simplicity, with just a few bits of information..." Fractal mathematics is a branch comprised of simple formulae by which conversions are made - fractal to fractal.
    The seemingly infinite complexity of the Mandelbrot set is based on the simple formula z'=z2 + c. Take a number, multiply it by itself, and add the original number.

    "By the 1980s,” Gleick writes, “a home computer could handle arithmetic precise enough to make colourful pictures of the [Mandelbrot] set, and hobbyists quickly found that exploring these pictures at ever-greater magnification gave a vivid sense of expanding scale. If the set were thought of as a planet-sized object, a personal computer could show the whole object, or features the size of cities, or the size of buildings, or the size of rooms, or the size of books, or the size of letters, or the size of bacteria, or the size of atoms. The people who looked at such pictures saw that all the scales had similar patterns, yet every scale was different. And all these microscopic landscapes were generated by the same few lines of computer code."

    A decade or so after the publication of Les Objets Fractal, as Gleick observes, a number of biologists (and not just "theoretical biologists") began the work of re-understanding the body in terms of fractal engineering.

    Today, the fractal approach is being used to better understanding every component of the human body.Neuroscientist Ary Freeman, for instance, maintains that a kind of "ordered unpredictability" lies at the heart of the brain's ability to perceive the world. "Studying the electrical activity of the brains of rabbits trained to recognise various smells, Freeman finds that the animals' brain waves shift to a different pattern of chaotic activity as each smell is inhaled..."
    link here


    http://www.flatrock.org.nz/topics/sc..._evolution.htm
    'Time is the space between birth and death' by me.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,120
    Science has now moved along, any thought of fractal gene memory as yet from this community?
    'Time is the space between birth and death' by me.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •