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Thread: The dinosaurs demise

  1. #1 The dinosaurs demise 
    1 Ugly MoFo warthog213's Avatar
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    After considering many ways that dinosaurs may have died off around 65 million years ago It finally dawned on me a few weeks back that they probably died off because they were cold blooded.... Which could mean that a nearly world wide winter like we see in here in Indiana or even worst, and could have caused them to die off over a larger span of time.... Also this probably would have left more warm blooded creatures alive here on earth.... A pre-iceage of sorts that would have first stunted the reptiles growth and then just killed them off from being cold too long....

    What i'm wondering is if there is any proof of something like this happening in the science community....
    I've heard many types of possible scenarios which may have killed them off and i'm intrested in the most logical method that may have caused them to die off as quickly as they did.... Not out of interest in the subject but more in the interest of our planets history....
    Perhaps the meteor scenario fits pretty good into the equation, but what I was thinking is the earth cooled off from a tropical state and become more like it is today thus explaining why the dinosaurs bones arent in the correct levels or rock.... This could be due to a change in the suns field or the earths gravity field changing slightly and altering its orbit over few thousand years.... In other words perhaps the orbit of the earth used to be more round as it traveled around the sun and for some reason moved to an eliptical shape.... Or even the axis of the earth used to be more straight up and down and it tilted for some reason (which is the one I see as more possible as the cause)
    Anyone of those reasons I could see causing this type of reaction and causing most of the larger cold blooded reptiles to die off, which one is best supported by science....


    (warthog) an ugly little animal in Africa that is hunted, killed and eaten by lions.

    Sorry i'm no scientist so don't expect me to use those terms which scientist use
    to explain things.... I am only an observer of things....

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    There is a lot of evidence that many were not cold blooded, too.

    You don't like science, at all, do you? You like to speculate, but any actual answers disinterest you.


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    There's pretty support now for a major comet or meteorite impact that cause the great extinction event that included the dinosaurs. Most models suggest a long period of several years of sun blocking flash forest fire smoke and impact debree that dramatically dropped global temperatures. There's also some evidence of increased volcanism near the anti-pod ( at the opposite ) side of the Chicxulub impact site which might have released quite a bit of CO2 and induced global warming for several centuries after the dust cleared. In any case the combined swings were too much for many ecosystems.

    I doubt we'll have the temporal resolution to know whether the mass extinction happened in months, years or decades or the specifics of the cascading ecosystem failure--we can surely develop pretty good models of a large impact followed by other events I partially described that match what we do know.
    Last edited by Lynx_Fox; January 27th, 2013 at 01:20 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by warthog213 View Post
    After considering many ways that dinosaurs may have died off around 65 million years ago It finally dawned on me a few weeks back that they probably died off because they were cold blooded.... Which could mean that a nearly world wide winter like we see in here in Indiana or even worst, and could have caused them to die off over a larger span of time.... Also this probably would have left more warm blooded creatures alive here on earth.... A pre-iceage of sorts that would have first stunted the reptiles growth and then just killed them off from being cold too long....

    What i'm wondering is if there is any proof of something like this happening in the science community....
    I've heard many types of possible scenarios which may have killed them off and i'm intrested in the most logical method that may have caused them to die off as quickly as they did.... Not out of interest in the subject but more in the interest of our planets history....
    Perhaps the meteor scenario fits pretty good into the equation, but what I was thinking is the earth cooled off from a tropical state and become more like it is today thus explaining why the dinosaurs bones arent in the correct levels or rock.... This could be due to a change in the suns field or the earths gravity field changing slightly and altering its orbit over few thousand years.... In other words perhaps the orbit of the earth used to be more round as it traveled around the sun and for some reason moved to an eliptical shape.... Or even the axis of the earth used to be more straight up and down and it tilted for some reason (which is the one I see as more possible as the cause)
    Anyone of those reasons I could see causing this type of reaction and causing most of the larger cold blooded reptiles to die off, which one is best supported by science....
    The problem is you can not compare the climate of 65 million years ago with today, the conditions are totally different. The continental configuration is very different, the ocean currents are very different. Also as Lynx_fox has pointed out, most dinosaurs are considered to have been at least gigantotherms if not full endotherms.

    Also what do you mean the "fossils are not int he correct rock levels"??
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    Forum Sophomore laza's Avatar
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    wait a minute, i thought that now all scientists are almost certain that an asteroid impact was the main reason of the extinction of dinosaurs, what am i missing ?
    "There is grandeur in this view of life,from so simple beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.”
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    Quote Originally Posted by laza View Post
    wait a minute, i thought that now all scientists are almost certain that an asteroid impact was the main reason of the extinction of dinosaurs, what am i missing ?
    What you're missing is that nothing warthog says should be taken valid.
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    1 Ugly MoFo warthog213's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexG View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by laza View Post
    wait a minute, i thought that now all scientists are almost certain that an asteroid impact was the main reason of the extinction of dinosaurs, what am i missing ?
    What you're missing is that nothing warthog says should be taken valid.
    I thought I was asking a question not assuming anything but asking if certain things may have been possible.... I know someone on here has studied the subject more deeply than myself.... Lynx_Fox had some really valid points.... Yes paleoichneum the fossils is what I was asking about.... But as Lynx had brought up that a meteor strike could have had some major repercussions on the environment if it were large enough....
    (warthog) an ugly little animal in Africa that is hunted, killed and eaten by lions.

    Sorry i'm no scientist so don't expect me to use those terms which scientist use
    to explain things.... I am only an observer of things....

    Every dream i've dreamed isn't the life I live in....
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by warthog213 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexG View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by laza View Post
    wait a minute, i thought that now all scientists are almost certain that an asteroid impact was the main reason of the extinction of dinosaurs, what am i missing ?
    What you're missing is that nothing warthog says should be taken valid.
    I thought I was asking a question not assuming anything but asking if certain things may have been possible.... I know someone on here has studied the subject more deeply than myself.... Lynx_Fox had some really valid points.... Yes paleoichneum the fossils is what I was asking about.... But as Lynx had brought up that a meteor strike could have had some major repercussions on the environment if it were large enough....
    WHICH fossils in WHICH rock strata? That is what I was asking about.
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by warthog213 View Post
    I thought I was asking a question ....
    As far as I can see, there is not a single question in your OP. Just a series of statements. Here is a clue: questions are terminated with a question mark. Understand?
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by warthog213 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexG View Post

    What you're missing is that nothing warthog says should be taken valid.
    I thought I was asking a question not assuming anything but asking if certain things may have been possible.... I know someone on here has studied the subject more deeply than myself.... Lynx_Fox had some really valid points.... Yes paleoichneum the fossils is what I was asking about.... But as Lynx had brought up that a meteor strike could have had some major repercussions on the environment if it were large enough....
    WHICH fossils in WHICH rock strata? That is what I was asking about.
    Im still waiting for an elaboration on the misplaced fossils
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

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  12. #11  
    1 Ugly MoFo warthog213's Avatar
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    "Misplaced" Did someone misplace some fossils ? I'm talking about the claim in the main statement made on that page which I visited claiming that fossils of dinosaurs were in the wrong era for that huge meteor strike.... Which would be in the mesozoic era or the age of the giant reptiles....

    That web site was stating that the age of the meteor apocolyptic event had occured in the wrong time period on earth and the bones or "fossils" were in the wrong layer of rock for the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event....


    I was wondering if some new evidence had been dicovered and that this was true because the old time info says that it occured about 66 million years ago which was the end of the age of the dinosaurs....
    Heres the wiki info on the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event
    The Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event occurred approximately 66 million years ago (Ma) at the end of the Maastrichtian age of the Cretaceous period. It was an intense, global mass extinction of animals and plants, most notably dinosaurs, taking place in a geologically short period of time. It is often called the K-Pg extinction, K being the abbreviation for the German term for the Cretaceous, Kreide, and Pg being the abbreviation for the Paleogene. It is perhaps better known as the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) extinction, but the term Tertiary is now discouraged as a formal unit by the International Commission on Stratigraphy.

    The Mesozoic Era is an interval of geological time from about 250 million years ago to about 65 million years ago. It is often referred to as the Age of Reptiles because reptiles, namely non-avian dinosaurs, were the dominant terrestrial and marine vertebrates of the time.

    "Which is what we all have believe had happened to the dinosaurs"
    (warthog) an ugly little animal in Africa that is hunted, killed and eaten by lions.

    Sorry i'm no scientist so don't expect me to use those terms which scientist use
    to explain things.... I am only an observer of things....

    Every dream i've dreamed isn't the life I live in....
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  13. #12  
    Time Lord Paleoichneum's Avatar
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    What is the time discrepancy? The impact is dated to ~65.5 million years ago. The information you provided here from wiki indicates ~65.5 million years ago. (remember you never linked to the actual article you were reading so all we have to go on is what you are posting.)
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

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  14. #13  
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    Quote Originally Posted by laza View Post
    wait a minute, i thought that now all scientists are almost certain that an asteroid impact was the main reason of the extinction of dinosaurs, what am i missing ?
    Nothing, except I'd say "most scientists are almost certain".

    Quote Originally Posted by warthog213
    That web site was stating....
    What website?
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    Haven't seen anything about misplaced fossils either. The comparable dates between the KT layer and the extinction dates are probably the best evidence supporting the impact (and its related consequences) hypothesis.
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    New proof that asteroid impact dealt the dinosaurs a quick death blow






    Don Davis
    An artist's impression of a 6-mile-wide asteroid striking the Earth. Scientists now have fresh evidence that such a cosmic impact ended the age of dinosaurs near what is now the town of Chixculub in Mexico.




    The idea that a cosmic impact ended the age of dinosaurs in what is now Mexico now has fresh new support, researchers say.
    The most recent and most familiar mass extinction is the one that finished the reign of the dinosaurs — the end-Cretaceous or Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event, often known as K-T. The only survivors among the dinosaurs are the birds.

    Currently, the main suspect behind this catastrophe is a cosmic impact from an asteroid or comet, an idea first proposed by physicist Luis Alvarez and his son, geologist Walter Alvarez. Scientists later found that signs of this collision seemed evident near the town of Chicxulub (CHEEK-sheh-loob) in Mexico in the form of a gargantuan crater more than 110 miles (180 kilometers) wide. The explosion, likely caused by an object about 6 miles (10 kilometers) across, would have released as much energy as 100 trillion tons of TNT, more than a billion times more than the atom bombs that destroyed Hiroshima and Nagasaki.





    However, further work suggested the Chicxulub impact occurred either 300,000 years before or 180,000 years after the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. As such, researchers have explored other possibilities, including other impact sites, such as the controversial Shiva crater in India, or even massive volcanic eruptions, such as those creating the Deccan Flats in India.
    Courtesy of Paul Renne
    Doctoral student Bill Mitchell collects a volcanic ash sample from a coal bed just above the final dinosaur extinction level.


    Timing of an impact
    New findings using high-precision radiometric dating analysis of debris kicked up by the impact now suggest the K-T event and the Chicxulub collision happened no more than 33,000 years apart. In radiometric dating, scientists estimate the ages of samples based on the relative proportions of specific radioactive materials within them. [Wipe Out: History's Most Mysterious Mass Extinctions]
    "We've shown the impact and the mass extinction coincided as much as one can possibly demonstrate with existing dating techniques," researcher Paul Renne, a geochronologist and director of the Berkeley Geochronology Center in California, told LiveScience.
    Courtesy of Klaudia Kuiper
    Near Jordan, Mont., rock layers expose the level (lower arrow) where dinosaurs and many other animals and plants went extinct. The arrows point to coal beds that contain thin volcanic ash layers that were dated.


    "It's gratifying to see these results, for those of us who've been arguing a long time that there was an impact at the time of this mass extinction," geologist Walter Alvarez at the University of California at Berkeley, who did not participate in this study, told LiveScience. "This research is just a tour de force, a demonstration of really skillful geochronology to resolve time that well."
    The fact the impact and mass extinction may have been virtually simultaneous in time supports the idea that the cosmic impact dealt the age of dinosaurs its deathblow.
    "The impact was clearly the final straw that pushed Earth past the tipping point," Renne said. "We have shown that these events are synchronous to within a gnat's eyebrow, and therefore, the impact clearly played a major role in extinctions, but it probably wasn't just the impact."
    The new extinction date is precise to within 11,000 years.
    "When I got started in the field, the error bars on these events were plus or minus a million years," added paleontologist William Clemens at the University of California at Berkeley, who did not participate in this research. "It's an exciting time right now, a lot of which we can attribute to the work that Paul and his colleagues are doing in refining the precision of the time scale with which we work."





    Cosmic Log: Asteroid closes in for close encounter — and a swift kick
    Although the cosmic impact and mass extinction coincided in time, Renne cautioned this does not mean the impact was the only cause of the die-offs. For instance, dramatic climate swings in the preceding million years, including long cold snaps in the general hothouse environment of the Cretaceous, probably brought many creatures to the brink of extinction. The volcanic eruptions behind the Deccan Traps might be one cause of these climate variations.
    "These precursory phenomena made the global ecosystem much more sensitive to even relatively small triggers, so that what otherwise might have been a fairly minor effect shifted the ecosystem into a new state," Renne said.
    The cosmic impact then proved the death blow.
    "What we really need to do is to understand better what was going on before the impact — what was the level of ecological stress that existed that allowed the impact to be the straw that broke the camel's back?" Renne said. "We also need better dates for the massive volcanism at the Deccan Flats to better understand when it first started and how fast it occurred."
    The scientists will detail their findings in Friday's issue of the journal Science.









    (warthog) an ugly little animal in Africa that is hunted, killed and eaten by lions.

    Sorry i'm no scientist so don't expect me to use those terms which scientist use
    to explain things.... I am only an observer of things....

    Every dream i've dreamed isn't the life I live in....
    Reply With Quote  
     

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