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Thread: Planting my vegetable seed in a very strange way.

  1. #1 Planting my vegetable seed in a very strange way. 
    The Enchanter westwind's Avatar
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    Seed sowing Season is almost to hand here in Melbourne Australia. I f today is any indication, Ishould be sowing tomorrow. ( Warm to Hot with a Northerly blowing in around 25/35 wind knots. ). Today is the 4th October, 2012.

    My first step shall be to mix twenty kinds of Vegetable Seed together, with a separator medium, say washed sand or light gravel, ready to line plant when I am ready.

    I have prepared the Bed for them and They will be Sowen directly into the Growing ground.

    The sowing line shall be 3 metres in length, 3/4 inches wide.

    Why am I doing this?

    I am experimenting. I am also bearing the cost and the Sponorship Fees.

    I shall keep a note book. Evertday there shall be an entry. At the end of every three week peroid or thereabouts I shall report to the Science Forum.( On progress or lack thereof) of various seed types, and their growth rates, if any.

    Will there eventually be a Harvest? No doubt. Who will prove the stronger? The carrot? the vine cucumber? The silver beet? the tomato?

    This is what I mean about Hands on... try to add to man's knowledge by observation and breaking the traditional practice, a failure is acceptable, even expected, but who knows? The Die will soon be cast and into the eye of the beholder some small miracle may emerge. westwind.


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    Words words words, were it better I caught your tears, and washed my face in them, and felt their sting. - westwind
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    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Rather an interesting take on 'companion planting'. Would you call this 'competition planting'?

    There is a fair amount of historical research that demonstrates that some plants thrive in the company of others while other plants seem detrimental to each other.

    Interplant potatoes with lettuce, scallions, radishes, and spinach. All of these crops mature fast and will be harvested long before the potatoes are ready to harvest.

    What Not To Plant with Potatoes:

    Avoid planting potatoes with tomatoes, sunflowers, raspberries, pumpkins, squash, and cucumbers. These plants seem to increase potatoes susceptibility to blight.
    Don't plant potatoes in an area that has been planted with any other Solanaceous crops in the last two years. This includes tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant.

    Radishes are commonly interspersed with carrot seed as an aid in germination for the robust radish can break through the soil should it become hard and crusted where the carrot might fail. Mixed greens, or mesclun mix, is a mixture of lettuces, coles and sometimes oriental veggies (pak choi, mustards) that one can just broadcast seed and start harvesting in 30 days, most varieties responding well to cutting and will come on again.

    Gardening is always a bit of an adventure and the outcome can be quite intriguing. Have you ever used fabric row cover to aid in retaining moisture and maintain even soil temperature? I find it the single most effective tool at my disposal. It usually comes in a bolt, like fabric, and I have cut it into manageable lengths of approx. 4 x 5 feet and then stapled a strip of thin dimensional lumber to the longer side to hold them in place against the wind. At the end of the season, I roll them up like shades for storage. I get at least three years out of each one which makes the investment worthwhile and the plants just lift the cover as they grow provided you don't start using too heavy of lumber to secure them.


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  4. #3  
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    I planted my garden in a strange way this year. I took the plants that my wife bought at the farmer's market (which I didn't really want) and stuck them in the ground, leaving them to fend for themselves the rest of the season. The tomato plants got eaten by deer, the squash died due to dry weather in June. The jalapeno peppers actually had a few fruits on them, which I was too lazy to pick. Everything else got choked out by the weeds. This was my contribution to agricultural science this year.
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  5. #4  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    I planted my garden in a strange way this year. I took the plants that my wife bought at the farmer's market (which I didn't really want) and stuck them in the ground, leaving them to fend for themselves the rest of the season. The tomato plants got eaten by deer, the squash died due to dry weather in June. The jalapeno peppers actually had a few fruits on them, which I was too lazy to pick. Everything else got choked out by the weeds. This was my contribution to agricultural science this year.
    LOL....One might conclude that without intervention, agriculture yields precisely the same results as nature....variable by season.

    By dint of planting proven hardy varieties in recycled raised freezer beds, covered with spun polyester row cover, and aided by a relatively cool season with significant moisture, I probably did the least amount of work gardening this year with excellent results.

    Pictured below are my mixed head lettuce, pricked out of my mesclun mix and planted individually, photo at August 31, 2012. To the right, you can see my carrot tops and the white fabric is the row cover that I mention in my previous post.

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  6. #5  
    The Enchanter westwind's Avatar
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    Yum. westwind.
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  7. #6  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by westwind View Post
    Yum. westwind.
    It was yummy, for a fact. I learned that the oak leaf varieties do not store very long once picked, so that would be one reason that I have never seen them in our supermarket though I expect one may find them at a farmer's market. Though late in the season, the lettuce was not bitter and I credit the row cover for maintaining moisture and temperature on a fairly even keel. My neighbor up the road had water limitations and did not cover her plants and found that they went bitter quite early on. Adelady shared that lettuce is quite sensitive to water stress and this is, in part, responsible for it turning bitter.

    The oak leaf varieties were the sweetest, almost buttery on the palate and a completely different texture from some of the romaine and other leaf types. I'll try a few more next year.

    I'll be interested in hearing the results of your gardening 'competition' and only wish that we could grow tomatoes and cucumbers outdoors. This year, I had to keep my tomatoes in the house because of variable and cool weather. I don't heat my attached greenhouse and I only risked a few of the hanging baskets out there, and they managed okay but not as productive as some years because of the lack of summer heat.

    Gardening is the ultimate 'next year' undertaking, IMO and gardeners are among the most optimistic people I know. We have faith in and adore Mother Earth, cruel creature that she oft reveals herself to be.
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    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    I borrowed my neighbors gas-powered weed-eater with tiller attachment, and tilled up all my beds yesterday...to get ready for planting. I haven't decided what to plant yet. I always plant my tomatoes with pepper plants mixed among them...it seems to help on insects. Although one year I planted jalapeno peppers along side of bell peppers and they cross-polinated. While the jalapenos look hot as hell....they we suitable for an elderly patient recovering from major surgury.

    In the front, I think I want to plant some tulip bulbs, that will bloom in Feb-march. I had good luck with periwinkle and dianthis last year during the 105 heat and drought. Everything else died...so I think I'll go with them again. In the back bed, I'm thinking of roma tomatoes, beef-steak tomatoes, bell peppers, onions, and maybe some herbs in the corner.

    I'm not sure what to do in my side yard. It's only 2 meters wide, and has a tall private fence and old trees that block almost all sun, nothing grows there...even weeds. I'm thinking of using a similar "shotgun" technique with various seeds, and just let mother nature declare the winner.
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    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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    Forum Junior JoshuaL's Avatar
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    Cool, I look forward to hearing the results of this fight o' flora. I didn't understand one thing you said though--something about sponsorship...? Is that a gardening term, or maybe you are renting a plot?
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    "The only appropriate attitude for man to have about the big questions is... doubt. Doubt is humble, and that's what man needs to be, considering that human history is just a litany of getting sh*t dead wrong."

    Take two of these and call me in the morning
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  10. #9  
    The Enchanter westwind's Avatar
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    Dear JoshuaL. Ilove to throw in extra words if I think they will round out the Topic. It's like verbal you know? But to answer your Question regards the use of Sponsorship. No, I am fortunate in having a little plot behind the House, catches the North and West light in the afternoon. ( Southern Hemisphere remember). No, sponsorship here in Australia is sought for any enterprise undertaken to defray costs etc etc. My clumsy attempt at dry humour( as many senior members of this Forum know) inasmuch as who in theit right mind would put up the money to fund my seed sowing experimental ""competitive "" Escpecially as the likely hood of any worthwhile Harvest is forlorn. But I shall plough on and let you know the results. westwind.
    Words words words, were it better I caught your tears, and washed my face in them, and felt their sting. - westwind
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