Notices
Results 1 to 9 of 9
Like Tree3Likes
  • 1 Post By adelady
  • 1 Post By pyoko
  • 1 Post By AlexG

Thread: Is that possible?

  1. #1 Is that possible? 
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    australia
    Posts
    225
    My friend told me he weight the mass of a peanut, which is 0.76129800098764g.

    I'm really confused, can he really get the mass of a peanut that accurate?

    Jin Guangnian


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  

    Related Discussions:

     

  3. #2  
    Moderator Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    city of wine and roses
    Posts
    6,222
    Don't know about weighing one single peanut. But it'd be easy enough to get an answer like that if you started by carefully, exactly weighing bulk peanuts then counted out the individual peanuts in the bag. Divide one by the other and you might get that kind of an answer.


    msafwan likes this.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Bachelors Degree dmwyant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    456
    I think that, due to variation in size and density it is impossible to say that all peanuts have that mass however that particular peanut may have a mass of 0.76129800098764g
    Not all who wander are lost... Some of us just misplaced our destination.

    I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet. The proper function of a man is to live, not to exist.
    -Jack London
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Professor pyoko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,094
    I think he got the figure using the "burning the single peanut calorie measure" school science (usually biology) experiment.

    Peanut Lab for the experiment
    msafwan likes this.
    It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Anti-Crank AlexG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2,809
    Or perhaps your friend as access to something like this.

    watt-balance_2.jpg
    msafwan likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Professor pyoko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,094
    Or he could have painstakingly counted the number of peanuts in a 1kg jar, measured the jar without the peanuts, measured it with peanuts, then took the mean weight and he might have got a very long number on the calculator, but this does not give him the leeway to claim that his measurement qualified to be accurate to that many decimal places.
    It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    16,670
    Quote Originally Posted by pyoko View Post
    I think he got the figure using the "burning the single peanut calorie measure" school science (usually biology) experiment.

    Peanut Lab for the experiment
    That looks like a great approach to science teaching! (We had one teacher who was a bit like that.) But I really hope he gets them to consider the sources of experimental error (they must be huge!)
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    Dear fellow members, this is a set up. Since you have all agreed that weighing an individual peanut to this accuracy is not possible and have called into question the number of significant figure, experimental error, etc, tomjin can now say - "And yet this is the accuracy which is required from a Cavendish balance and so our theories of gravity are wrong."

    tomjin?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Professor pyoko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,094
    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt View Post
    Dear fellow members, this is a set up. Since you have all agreed that weighing an individual peanut to this accuracy is not possible and have called into question the number of significant figure, experimental error, etc, tomjin can now say - "And yet this is the accuracy which is required from a Cavendish balance and so our theories of gravity are wrong."

    tomjin?
    Oh, oh, oh!!..... HOLLOW EARTH can now be real!!!

    It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •