Notices
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Fibre Optic particle accelerator

  1. #1 Fibre Optic particle accelerator 
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    808
    Drill a small borehole a few miles towards the centre of the earth. Hollow a fibre optic strand to particle size. Hang the thread straight down the borehole. Insert a particle into the centre of the strand. Shine light into the strand. Will the photons accelerate the particle? Will the particle, because of relativity, no matter how fast it goes, even close to C, see the photons ahead of it as travelling at C, allowing the particle C amount of acceleration?

    The strand is not laid horizontal to avoid the effects of gravity distorting the particle's path.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,155
    Quote Originally Posted by Aristarchus in Exile View Post
    Drill a small borehole a few miles towards the centre of the earth. Hollow a fibre optic strand to particle size. Hang the thread straight down the borehole. Insert a particle into the centre of the strand. Shine light into the strand. Will the photons accelerate the particle?
    If you just drilled a hole there will likely be some bleed over from the fiber to hole that will provide some momentum transfer to the particle

    Will the particle, because of relativity, no matter how fast it goes, even close to C, see the photons ahead of it as travelling at C, allowing the particle C amount of acceleration?
    1. light does not travel at c in a fiber optic cable but closer to 0.66c. That being the case, the particle would see the light travel ahead of it at



    So for example if the particle was moving at 0.5c relative to the optic cable, it would see the light travel at 0.24c. Remember it is not light that is special, it is the speed c. Since the light does not travel at c in the cable, you cannot claim that everyone will measure it speed to be the same.

    2. Even if we use light traveling in a vacuum at c ( for example, with a light sail), even thought the sail will always measure the light as traveling at c relative to itself now matter how fast it is moving relative to the source, the momentum and energy of that light hitting the sail will drop off. This is because the light will be more and more red shifted as the sail moves faster and faster away from the source. Since the frequency decreases as measured by the sail, so the does the momentum and the light pressure. The frequency and momentum will approach zero as the sails speed approaches c.
    The strand is not laid horizontal to avoid the effects of gravity distorting the particle's path.


    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


    Edit/Delete Message
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    808
    Janus .. your tone and information sets this forum apart from all others. Thanks.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. particle
    By saravanan in forum Physics
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: April 19th, 2011, 04:48 PM
  2. Replies: 7
    Last Post: October 30th, 2009, 11:16 PM
  3. Optic fiber
    By Anu in forum Electrical and Electronics
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: April 29th, 2009, 08:19 AM
  4. Space Accelerator
    By GrantG in forum Physics
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: January 12th, 2007, 12:26 AM
  5. SAUCER SCIENCE 01 PHOTONIC AND QUANTUM OPTIC
    By 00 SAUCER-SCIENCE in forum Pseudoscience
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: July 3rd, 2005, 04:58 PM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •