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Thread: Recommended reading

  1. #1 Recommended reading 
    Moderator Moderator TheBiologista's Avatar
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    Science:

    A general primer on the scientific method can be found on my own blog:

    Part 1
    Part 2

    A Hot Cup Of Joe, our own SkinWalker's blog on archaeology with forays into pseudoscience and scepticism.

    General blogs on good science across all fields can be found at:

    http://scienceblogs.com/


    Science, Bad Science and Pseudo Science:


    Ben Goldacre's Bad Science website discusses the portrayal of science in the media, the misunderstanding of statistics in evidence and also delves into what pseudo science is and where its proponents go wrong.

    http://www.badscience.net/

    Goldacre also has a book, similarly titled Bad Science, which makes excellent reading for those who want to understand how evidence and fair tests work in science. The focus in this case is primarily on health and medicine.

    The hypnotist Derren Brown also has an excellent book (Tricks of the Mind) on how various paranormal style phenomena work. His chapters on how the human mind processes evidence and how confirmation bias works are extremely informative and well worth a look.

    General blogs on bad science and pseudo science also include:

    Quack-O-Meter, a general blog on pseudo science in medicine.

    Holford Watch, a blog primarily focused on the affairs of modern day snake-oil merchant Patrick Holford.

    Respectful Insolence

    The Skeptics Guide


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  3. #2  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard SkinWalker's Avatar
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    Hey, Biologista! I didn't realize you had a blog. I really must pay closer attention to sigs on this board

    I'll be visiting more often, good stuff there. I noticed also that you recently had 1st post on Pharyngula! I've been trying to do that for years... congrats!

    As long as your posting links to good reading, I'll pass on my own blog's pseudoarchaeology tag. I've ended a couple of these posts with links and citations that would be useful.

    Of course, one cannot recommend enough A Demon-Haunted World by Carl Sagan. Mandatory reading if you ask me.

    I would also recommend better blogs than mine for following the current issues in pseudoscience: The Rogue's Gallery and Respectful Insolence.


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  4. #3  
    Moderator Moderator TheBiologista's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkinWalker
    Hey, Biologista! I didn't realize you had a blog. I really must pay closer attention to sigs on this board

    I'll be visiting more often, good stuff there. I noticed also that you recently had 1st post on Pharyngula! I've been trying to do that for years... congrats!

    As long as your posting links to good reading, I'll pass on my own blog's pseudoarchaeology tag. I've ended a couple of these posts with links and citations that would be useful.

    Of course, one cannot recommend enough A Demon-Haunted World by Carl Sagan. Mandatory reading if you ask me.

    I would also recommend better blogs than mine for following the current issues in pseudoscience: The Rogue's Gallery and Respectful Insolence.
    Thanks Skin, I'll add these to the main post!
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  5. #4 Re: Recommended reading 
    . DrRocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBiologista
    Science:

    A general primer on the scientific method can be found on my own blog:

    Part 1
    Part 2

    A Hot Cup Of Joe, our own SkinWalker's blog on archaeology with forays into pseudoscience and scepticism.

    General blogs on good science across all fields can be found at:

    http://scienceblogs.com/


    Science, Bad Science and Pseudo Science:


    Ben Goldacre's Bad Science website discusses the portrayal of science in the media, the misunderstanding of statistics in evidence and also delves into what pseudo science is and where its proponents go wrong.

    http://www.badscience.net/

    Goldacre also has a book, similarly titled Bad Science, which makes excellent reading for those who want to understand how evidence and fair tests work in science. The focus in this case is primarily on health and medicine.

    The hypnotist Derren Brown also has an excellent book (Tricks of the Mind) on how various paranormal style phenomena work. His chapters on how the human mind processes evidence and how confirmation bias works are extremely informative and well worth a look.

    General blogs on bad science and pseudo science also include:

    Quack-O-Meter, a general blog on pseudo science in medicine.

    Holford Watch, a blog primarily focused on the affairs of modern day snake-oil merchant Patrick Holford.

    Respectful Insolence

    The Skeptics Guide
    You might consider adding a book -- The Character of Physical Law by Richard P. Feynman.
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  6. #5 Re: Recommended reading 
    Moderator Moderator TheBiologista's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket
    You might consider adding a book -- The Character of Physical Law by Richard P. Feynman.
    Cheers DrRocket, I will take a look at that. I quite like Feynman, when I can understand his subject matter. He wrote an interesting piece on the Challenger Disaster some time around 86/87 which was quite a worrying but enlightening read.
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  7. #6 Re: Recommended reading 
    . DrRocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBiologista
    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket
    You might consider adding a book -- The Character of Physical Law by Richard P. Feynman.
    Cheers DrRocket, I will take a look at that. I quite like Feynman, when I can understand his subject matter. He wrote an interesting piece on the Challenger Disaster some time around 86/87 which was quite a worrying but enlightening read.
    This particular book is accessible to anyone. Classic, entertaining and elightening Feynman.
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  8. #7  
    Moderator Moderator Dishmaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkinWalker
    Of course, one cannot recommend enough A Demon-Haunted World by Carl Sagan. Mandatory reading if you ask me.
    Thank you for the recommendation. I ordered it just because of this post. Just passed the third chapter. Although it is a bit too - let's say - personal and anecdotal for my taste, I agree with the content 100%. Indeed: mandatory. Unfortunately, German translations are either very hard to get or they are very expensive. So, it is not available to the general public here.
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  9. #8  
    Forum Professor Zwirko's Avatar
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    Another link for the sceptically minded:

    Rationally Speaking - the blog of Massimo Pigliucci (author of "Nonsene on Stilts - how to tell science from bunk"). The podcast is also usually very good.
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  10. #9  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard SkinWalker's Avatar
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    That reminds me of his new book, Nonsense on Stilts. I have it but haven't yet got around to reading it.

    Pigliucci was also heavily influenced in his earlier skeptical writings by John Casti and his book, Paradigms Lost, which is a very interesting skeptical read. He covers topics that many skeptics do not and I've been thinking of reading it again since its been about 10 years since the last time I read it.

    Another book, which I recently read and reviewed on my blog, is Beyond the Hoax by Alan Sokal. Some of you might remember Sokal as the guy that "hoaxed" an academic journal with a monograph that was written as a post-modernist critique of science, which, in actuality, said very little to nothing of substance and was intentionally incoherent and... well... bullshit. His goal was to demonstrate that some editors were swept up in the 90's by the post-modernist movement and were willing to sacrifice good editing for papers they perceived as politically leaning their way.

    Anyway, good summary of Sokal's book at my blog. Perhaps I should repost it here in its own thread...
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