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Thread: Modern Laws of Global Life

  1. #1 Modern Laws of Global Life 
    Forum Junior newnothing's Avatar
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    Here is a clip that tries to explain the Law of Success in today's modern life.

    I find it interesting as it proposes that the reason each of us strive for success (whether in work, studies, knowledge etc), it is because society views success highly. This means each of us strive towards gaining recognition from society in every way we can, we want and need the attention of society. We then attribute the resulting success/accomplishments (base on society's benchmark) to ourselves. What is interesting is that since the goals come from society, then shouldn't the success/accomplishments be attributed to the society instead? Then the next question that pops up is, why would one want to work for society to adhere to its standards to be slave to those standards ie. nice car, nice job, nice wife, nice kids etc. Why can't I work for myself? But then again, what goals should I choose if its success rely on society's acknowledgment. Ok... my head is spinning now. :?


    ~ One’s ultimate perfection depends on the development of all the members of society ~ Kabbalah
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    Forum Professor sunshinewarrior's Avatar
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    Some good stuff to think about, there. Be aware, however, that the way in which it might seem to be stated appears "all or nothing". What if one of the primary drivers of ambition was social status, but that there could also be other, personal or non-social motivators also at work?


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    Forum Junior newnothing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunshinewarrior
    Some good stuff to think about, there. Be aware, however, that the way in which it might seem to be stated appears "all or nothing". What if one of the primary drivers of ambition was social status, but that there could also be other, personal or non-social motivators also at work?
    Isn't social status given by society? For example most people (society) view a wealthy successful business person as having high social status, an individual might then set his ambitions to be rich and powerful because of the high social status awarded to it by society. But even personal motivators can be influenced or dictated by society right?
    ~ One’s ultimate perfection depends on the development of all the members of society ~ Kabbalah
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    Forum Professor sunshinewarrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by newnothing
    Quote Originally Posted by sunshinewarrior
    Some good stuff to think about, there. Be aware, however, that the way in which it might seem to be stated appears "all or nothing". What if one of the primary drivers of ambition was social status, but that there could also be other, personal or non-social motivators also at work?
    Isn't social status given by society? For example most people (society) view a wealthy successful business person as having high social status, an individual might then set his ambitions to be rich and powerful because of the high social status awarded to it by society. But even personal motivators can be influenced or dictated by society right?
    Influenced maybe, but not determined. It's important to bear that distinction in mind.

    And perhaps play with a few thought experiments...

    Before Man Friday came along, what were Robinson Crusoe's ambitions on the island itself? Besides survival, what else would he have driven himself to do? There was no society around to assign him a status, but did he slip into catatonia?

    And so on...
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    Forum Junior newnothing's Avatar
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    Thank you for the example of Robinson Crusoe. Putting oneself in isolation of society, whether by personal choice or by accident (in the case of Robinson Crusoe) means one is free from the goals and constraints of society. But can we deny that we're greatly affected by how society view us?

    When you brought up Robinson Crusoe another question comes to mind. Can a person survive alone without society?
    ~ One’s ultimate perfection depends on the development of all the members of society ~ Kabbalah
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