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View Poll Results: Did You Know There Are Fixed Ohm, And Variable Ohm Heaters?

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  • Yes, the fixed ohm heaters are very much like electronic resistors

    1 100.00%
  • Yes, the radiant glowing heaters are more like induction loads

    0 0%
  • No, there are not!

    0 0%
  • All heaters are the same.

    0 0%
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Elemental Loads

  1. #1 Elemental Loads 
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    I know this subject is not understood well. It used to be in America.

    But today, it definitely is not understood by many. I have been doing some research into who does and who does not know about glowing, elemental loads. Not many do.

    There is a big difference between glowing elemental loads that are excited beyond their stable temperature, and a resistor. Either wire wound, carbon or other type.

    The excited element is just like an induction load. It will reciprocate with a powerful backlash. Creating AC current. They are even listed with their starting voltage, rather then their running voltage which is different.

    I realize now that many did not know this. I manufactured heating equipment and used to travel to other states to install and repair heating equipment. I used a form of heating element that did not raise much in ohms as it heated. So it blew fast acting fuses almost immediately, if there was a voltage spike, or just a case where high voltage made it into the factory. This used to happen at night a lot. We would record high voltage at night. Sometimes almost sixty volts higher at night, then in the day time.

    This video shows how an excited light bulb element reciprocates with a reverse flow of power, when it is disconnected. Or if the element breaks.

    In the movie I say the power can be rectified, I mean that, because there is a 24 volt swing or change in polarity, you can create 24 volts DC current in one cycle. Any device or rectifier that can store a charge for just a fraction of a second, even a piece of wire, can hold that charge while the swing takes place. As this swing takes place, now you have 24 volts, in just one AC cycle. I know that 24 volts is not to scary. But when you are working with 480, and I did. You start to have some second thoughts.

    This video should show what I mean about elemental loads dropping out, of the circuit or loop.

    http://www.Rockwelder.com/Flash/Elem...mentBreak.html

    This effect raises hertz with each DC cycle by 2X. If an element breaks.

    That is what all that high pitched noise is when you hear ARC welding. Sometimes you can get it to sound like a diesel train whistle when you ARC weld.

    Sincerely,


    William McCormick


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  3. #2  
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    Sorry, William. This doesn't cut the mustard. We don't know how you set up the test, or what scale your oscilloscope was on. If you used a d-c power supply, it could have an inductor in the filter, which gave you an inductive kick. So you haven't proved your point about breaking the circuit with a heater. What do you mean by raising the hertz by 2X with d-c? There are no d-c hertz.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370
    Sorry, William. This doesn't cut the mustard. We don't know how you set up the test, or what scale your oscilloscope was on. If you used a d-c power supply, it could have an inductor in the filter, which gave you an inductive kick. So you haven't proved your point about breaking the circuit with a heater. What do you mean by raising the hertz by 2X with d-c? There are no d-c hertz.
    What do you doubt about the reality? It was a battery, as the power source. Pretty cut and dry.

    The oscilloscope was set to read AC. And it does. The reference was connected to one of the batteries terminals. The (+) terminal.
    The only thing that causes that is the glowing elemental load. If I replace that with a small resistor to drain the oscilloscope picofarad capacitor. It would not give an AC reading. But rather just a raise and fall in voltage. It would not cross the neutral mark.

    The probes were at 1X ohms, or basically using the built in 10 million ohm, scope ohms. Compensated for, so that the vertically read voltage, per grid, and dial indicator, Match in the 1X indication area.

    You can change the setting on the probes to 10X and add another 10 million ohms. Instantly the grid measures ten times a vertical division as the 1x probe did. Meaning that if the 1X probe was set to read 5 volts per vertical division, the 10X probe interchanged with the 1X probe will read, 50 volts per vertical division. If you put in a 100X probe, instantly the scope will read 500 volts per vertical division.

    Although many guys cut their ground to their scope, to avoid really bad disintegration. Mine is correctly grounded, because I understand the way the scope works, and how it is connected inside.

    I do not short out my scope. Yet, Ha-ha. I have had it for years and have tested all kinds of power, even three phase high legs.

    Most people do not know. However a standard circuit breaker has an inductive device inside of it. It is that piece of copper braided wire inside of it. It is to small to carry that amperage. But it is so short, that it can do it. It is there so tremendous voltage and amperage is hindered during an accident. Much like a fuse hinders excessive voltage and amperage.

    Without that device, you could disintegrate a pole or underground grid transformer.

    A glowing element acts just like an induction load. And can send those lovely spikes back at you. I have felt them. They are real.



    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370
    Sorry, William. This doesn't cut the mustard. We don't know how you set up the test, or what scale your oscilloscope was on. If you used a d-c power supply, it could have an inductor in the filter, which gave you an inductive kick. So you haven't proved your point about breaking the circuit with a heater. What do you mean by raising the hertz by 2X with d-c? There are no d-c hertz.

    I can take a metal knife standing on dry ground and touch, the hot 120 volt wire. No problem at all. I touch the metal top on my variac all the time and do not even know it. It is often charged with 120 volts. Cannot even feel it.

    But I would not stick a knife into a toaster. If those elements break, you could, even standing in very good boots, cough out a lung, if you break an element.

    According to you and what you have told a bunch of people here, nothing should happen if you break the element in a toaster. There should be no lethal spike or high frequency.

    You may deny it, but you have preached the basics that say nothing should happen.

    Well, my mom when she was a kid stuck a knife into a toaster and got whacked, and she always told people not to do that.

    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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  6. #5  
    Moderator Moderator TheBiologista's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370
    Sorry, William. This doesn't cut the mustard. We don't know how you set up the test, or what scale your oscilloscope was on. If you used a d-c power supply, it could have an inductor in the filter, which gave you an inductive kick. So you haven't proved your point about breaking the circuit with a heater. What do you mean by raising the hertz by 2X with d-c? There are no d-c hertz.

    I can take a metal knife standing on dry ground and touch, the hot 120 volt wire. No problem at all. I touch the metal top on my variac all the time and do not even know it. It is often charged with 120 volts. Cannot even feel it.

    But I would not stick a knife into a toaster. If those elements break, you could, even standing in very good boots, cough out a lung, if you break an element.

    According to you and what you have told a bunch of people here, nothing should happen if you break the element in a toaster. There should be no lethal spike or high frequency.

    You may deny it, but you have preached the basics that say nothing should happen.

    Well, my mom when she was a kid stuck a knife into a toaster and got whacked, and she always told people not to do that.
    I know squat about eletrickery and such, but you should probably try to steer clear of presenting anecdotes as evidence. Give us theory, proper evidence or both.
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBiologista
    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370
    Sorry, William. This doesn't cut the mustard. We don't know how you set up the test, or what scale your oscilloscope was on. If you used a d-c power supply, it could have an inductor in the filter, which gave you an inductive kick. So you haven't proved your point about breaking the circuit with a heater. What do you mean by raising the hertz by 2X with d-c? There are no d-c hertz.

    I can take a metal knife standing on dry ground and touch, the hot 120 volt wire. No problem at all. I touch the metal top on my variac all the time and do not even know it. It is often charged with 120 volts. Cannot even feel it.

    But I would not stick a knife into a toaster. If those elements break, you could, even standing in very good boots, cough out a lung, if you break an element.

    According to you and what you have told a bunch of people here, nothing should happen if you break the element in a toaster. There should be no lethal spike or high frequency.

    You may deny it, but you have preached the basics that say nothing should happen.

    Well, my mom when she was a kid stuck a knife into a toaster and got whacked, and she always told people not to do that.
    I know squat about eletrickery and such, but you should probably try to steer clear of presenting anecdotes as evidence. Give us theory, proper evidence or both.
    You were not here for the other hundred posts about this subject. I have been attempting to tell, "learned specialists in electricity", that during an ARC (Anode, Rectified, Cathode) that glass can detonate from the voltage, created by the arc.
    Even when the source voltage is 110 volts. The ARC created, carries much more voltage in many cases. Disintegrative voltage in many cases.

    I am just sharing all the points of view, in my life to try to enlighten the guys here. That obviously have not worked in the field or with this stuff. And yet hold positions of moderation and administration. They could kill someone through ignorance, of reality. Or they know and are foreign terrorists.

    I just disintegrated a Christmas tree bulb the other day. Trying to create a demonstration to show how a neon bulb can flash, during an arc where the supply power is not near the voltage necessary to light a neon bulb. And at the same time try to film it.

    During this, I crossed wires and totally detonated a Christmas tree light. It is just totally missing in action. Just a white haze on the surface of the work bench, where it used to be. There was no voltage over 140 volts present, from a source.

    But as a kid we used to use a tiny bit of initiating explosive, along with glass crystals. To give capacity to the initiating explosive. That could then give enough amperage to the asphalt to blow a huge crater in the street. At night it would light up a block and it sounded, like the block was being bombed.

    I just cannot believe none of these people had a kids life. I also cannot believe that colleges do not know this. This is stuff, we used to learn by the first grade. I knew it well before that.

    Growing up certain kids cap gun caps, if put into a metal can to increase the effect of the single cap, by using a baseball bat end to detonate a whole bunch together. Can occasionally detonate asphalt, it depends on the setup. I was told never smash a bunch of caps on the manhole cover. Because at that time everyone knew what I know. There were real incidents and good parents warned their kids.

    My son and I were making and lightning German explosives, when he was two years old. I used to work three jobs, and he would wait for me to come home, even at ten o'clock at night. The door would fly open as soon as he heard my car. And he would say "Dad, Dad, can we make explosives"?
    I could not say no to him. He was so good.


    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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  8. #7  
    Administrator KALSTER's Avatar
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    I could not say no to him. He was so good.
    Where is your son now if I may ask?
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

    "Gullibility kills" - Carl Sagan
    "All people know the same truth. Our lives consist of how we chose to distort it." - Harry Block
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." - Aristotle
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  9. #8  
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    Probably in the federal pen, nabbed by the ATF.
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER
    I could not say no to him. He was so good.
    Where is your son now if I may ask?
    He lives with me. But he does not experiment much anymore.


    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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  11. #10  
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    Is he as wackey as you are????
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  12. #11  
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    If this becomes personal I'm going to get very cranky and moderator-y.
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  13. #12  
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    Ok I'm with Harold then, I'll go to the Ignore and Laugh Alot mode, At least in Pseudoscience it's the right place for this nonsense.
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  14. #13  
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    Quote Originally Posted by fizzlooney
    Is he as wackey as you are????

    Define "wackey" I believe you meant whacky or wacky.

    But no he is not wacky, I could even by my own standard consider myself a bit wacky, but it is the times. They demand hard lines to be drawn, or we will all be in the dark and the dark ages.



    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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