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Thread: wormholes

  1. #1 wormholes 
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    Hello do you believe in wormholes and if yes how do they function?


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  3. #2  
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    i do not believe in them but im sure they can be created from blackholes. under the proper circumstances.


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  4. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by mahydraal View Post
    i do not believe in them but im sure they can be created from blackholes. under the proper circumstances.
    Why are you sure? Can you explain how?
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  5. #4  
    Moderator Moderator Markus Hanke's Avatar
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    I copy and paste from an answer I have given to this same question on a different thread :

    1. The tensor equations of GR are somewhat peculiar in that all physically observable geometries are exact mathematical solutions, however, not all mathematical solutions are necessarily physically possible. What that means is - yes, wormhole metrics in general are solutions of the GR field equations, but that does not constitute final evidence that wormholes actually exist
    2. A wormhole would be a region of high spacetime curvature, which means a high energy density; in such a region quantum effects will be significant. Since we do not yet have a conistent theory of quantum gravity, it is impossible to predict the possibility or behaviour of wormholes. General relativity alone is not sufficient here, so it might turn out that these constructs are allowed by GR, but excluded due to quantum gravity effects. At the moment we don't really know.
    3. It is currently unclear whether macroscopic wormholes would be stable phenomena or not. There is a distinct possibility that a stable wormhole would need a gravitational singularity at each end to remain stable; this of course would mean that all stable wormholes are hidden behind event horizons and are therefore not causally connected to the rest of the universe ( which would make sense since it avoids all the pitfalls of causality violation ).
    4. A wormhole, if such a thing exists, could connect two regions in separate, otherwise non-interacting universes, or two regions within the same space-time which are either spatially or temporally separated ( or both ). The obvious problem here is causality violations, since such a wormhole could conceivably permit time travel.
    5. Even assuming that wormholes are macroscopic, stable phenomena not hidden behind event horizons ( in my mind a rather distant possibility at best ), it would be somewhat unlikely that one could just fly through them in a spacecraft. Depending on the exact geometry, the tidal forces inherent in a wormhole would either crush any object entering it, or tear it apart.
    6. If (5) holds true and wormholes are real, then in theory it should be possibly to artificially create one given a certain level of technological achievement, and the availability of vast amounts of the correct kind of energy in just the right configuration. The problem here is that you could only exactly localize one end of the wormhole at a time - there is no conceivable mechanism to control where and when the other end forms.
    7. One should also not forget that the spacetime curvature of a wormhole has no saddle points, which means that spacetime curves in the same direction on both ends. While it would be easy to enter such a wormhole, it might be very hard or even impossible to escape it out the other side. In fact, a wormhole might be a trap in that incoming matter reaches equilibrium at the equivalent of a Lagrange point ( the wormhole's "centre" so to speak ). Such a wormhole would very quickly deteriorate into a singularity due to quantum effects; I suppose this may be another counter-argument against its existence

    In general I would not categorically exclude the possibility that stable macroscopic wormholes exist, but personally I find it somewhat unlikely. The final answer will come once we develop a consistent quantum gravity model.
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  6. #5  
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    Meteorwayne please check the thread I posted on design for my wormhole generator mister hanke here has been doing some mathmatical explaining and the thread is rich with interesting information
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