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Thread: way to make large donations to campaign

  1. #1 way to make large donations to campaign 
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    i think there's something like a 2000 dollar limit to how much you can donate to a political campaign, but what if you donated a commodity like gold or silver? are there any laws against this?


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  3. #2  
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    According to the "Federal Election Commission" (FEC);

    No person can contribute more than 2300.00 per election, to any Federal Candidate. This includes the value of an object or to the point, any service. Food, drink, office equipment etc, but not including volunteer work. A primary, a run off and the General Election are separate elections and the limits pertain separately.


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  4. #3  
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    thanks for that
    well here's one to make you think, what if you payed a campaign in company stock and over the course of a few months that stock came to be worth many times more than what it started out being, still illegal?
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by medlakeguy
    thanks for that
    well here's one to make you think, what if you payed a campaign in company stock and over the course of a few months that stock came to be worth many times more than what it started out being, still illegal?
    Transferring any stock/equity, and to any person or entity, has a value from the end of the day transfered. If the value, at that time was 2300. or less, its a legal transfer under FEC. Future value is of no importance. To the candidate however, if not sold the same day (most likely scenario), they would be liable to spend the increase or follow rules governing excess funds, when the campaign or election is over. Another example would be under inheritance law, when the person receiving items is liable for 'property gains' taxes, only from the time transferred to when sold.
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