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Thread: CAN AMERICA SURVIVE WITHOUT HIDDEN SLAVERY?

  1. #1 CAN AMERICA SURVIVE WITHOUT HIDDEN SLAVERY? 
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    The definition of slavery in my title I learned from Abraham Lincoln
    (1809-65), 16th President of The United States, signer of the 1833
    "Emancipation Proclamation" to free African-American slaves, Lincoln
    said it in the Seventh and Last Debate with Stephen A. Douglas, Alton,
    Illinois, October 15, 1858, the famous debates that put Lincoln on the
    road to Presidency: "That is the issue that will continue in this country
    when these poor tongues of Judge Douglas and myself shall be silent. It
    is the eternal struggle between these two principles -- right and wrong
    -- throughout the world. They are the two principles that have stood face
    to face from the beginning of time; and will ever continue to struggle.
    The one is the common right of humanity and the other the divine right
    of kings. It is the same principle in whatever shape it develops itself.
    It is the same spirit that says, 'You work and toil and earn bread, and
    I'll eat it.' No matter in what shape it comes, whether from the mouth
    of a king who seeks to bestride the people of his own nation and live
    by the fruit of their labor, or from one race of men as an apology for
    enslaving another race [or other people, it is the same tyrannical
    principle." One form of present day Hidden Slavery: most of America's
    independent inventors lose their patent rights in the courts.
    American Contract Law permits corporations to fight independent
    inventors (and their inheritors) for up to 99 years -- as in one case
    I found online -- until the independent side can no longer afford legal
    action. (Irony: The Fourteenth Amendment to The Constitution to provide
    civil rights to former slaves was interpreted by The Supreme Court to
    make corporations legal! Are corporations our inventor plantations? And
    do the banks know this, in denying loans to striving inventors?)
    Today's Americans and Media mavens ignore the fact that America's most
    famous inventor, Thomas Edison (1847-1931), spent
    more money defending his patents in the courts than he made from
    licenses. Today's Americans and Media mavens ignore past inventors
    (especially women and African-Americans) who endowed our lives: they
    work and toil while we eat their bread. Historians denigrate invention
    by citing as the only "Industrial Revolution" what should be called
    The Thermodynamic Industtrial Revolution[/i], beginning in 1776 with
    an effective steam engine, ignoring The Mechanical Industrial
    Revolution of 12th-13th centuries when monks built thousands of wind
    mills and water mills over Europe and Britain (cited in "The Medieval
    Machine: The Industrial Revolution of the Middle Ages", J. Gimpel.
    Also ignoring The Electrical Industrial Revolution<, beginning in 1880
    when Thomas Edison wired the streets of NYC. Ignoring The Electronic
    Industrial Revolution, beginning with 1920's radio stations. And
    The Photonic-Nanotech Industrial Revolution, begun recently. Today's
    Americans and Media mavens ignore Sam Slater (1768-1835), Father of
    the American Industrial Revolution, whose inventiveness founded the
    first major American industry: textiles. (Wikipedia has this.) A
    1980's newspaper reported that the only kitchen convenience not
    created by independent inventors in basement or garage was the
    garbage disposal. A 1980's TV network program, "If Japan Can Do
    It, Why Can't We?", reported many cases wherein American inventors
    were ignored in America but paid and honored in other countries.
    (Jack Kilby, American inventor of the microchip, was honored in
    Japan for this decades before being honored here.) Have you heard
    of Margaret Knight (1838-1914)? You've used her invention: the
    box-type paper shopping bag. Knight built the machine making these,
    and her original machine is in The Smithsonian Museum.
    Google("women inventors+jonhays") to read of her and others. Today,
    the only extant history of early American inventors, "Yankee Science
    in the Making" (1958), was written by a Dutch-American mathematician,
    Dirk Sruik (1894-2000). Many inventors listed by Struik invented guns
    for the American Revolution and for developing our new country, but
    America's two largest gun-firms are now owned by British interests,
    a fact ignored by The National Rifle Association as well as by
    Americans and Media mavens. also ignored are debts to scientists.
    The TV screen and computer screen are consequences of the 1905
    "Photo-Electric Effect Law" of Albert Einstein (1875-1955). Thanks,
    Al!--Years ago I formulated a "find cuurent independent inventors
    test". Each year I'd calculate the number of years since end of WWII.
    Then go back the same number of years before WWII. I'd consult the
    current "World Almanac" (popular with Americans) to see the number
    of independent inventors listed. Usually, I'd find A DECLINE OF
    ABOUT 400 PER CENT! If that were a comparable decline in newspapers
    or TV station or motion picture theaters, you'd hear about it! Does
    any one care about this hidden slavery and its effect upon our lives?


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  3. #2  
    Forum Professor Pendragon's Avatar
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    It would be interesting if you could broaden your question, to not only include the US but other countries as well. This is after all an international forum. But if your argument applies specifically to the US then you can ignore this.


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  4. #3 The USA aren't America 
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    Which America do you mean? North or South America?

    The USA aren't America.

    .
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  5. #4  
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    A silmple answer is: NO.

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  6. #5 Re: CAN AMERICA SURVIVE WITHOUT HIDDEN SLAVERY? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonhays
    Does
    any one care about this hidden slavery and its effect upon our lives?
    You have thrown out a laundry list of facts about inventors, but you haven't really made much of a case that they are unfairly exploited. So what if gun companies are owned by the British? So what if there are fewer independent inventors? What's unfair about it?
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  7. #6 Re: CAN AMERICA SURVIVE WITHOUT HIDDEN SLAVERY? 
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    I found some inaccuracies and distortions in your piece. These tend to detract from the validity of your thesis. Perhaps you could comment on them
    Quote Originally Posted by jonhays
    Today's Americans and Media mavens ignore the fact that America's most famous inventor, Thomas Edison (1847-1931), spent
    more money defending his patents in the courts than he made from
    licenses.
    I was always under the impression that the Edison's inventions were largely the product of the research group he established. The actual inventors of the products were just 'wage slaves'. Edison was a prime example of the corporate power you object to. Where am I mistaken?
    Quote Originally Posted by jonhays
    Historians denigrate invention
    by citing as the only "Industrial Revolution" what should be called
    The Thermodynamic Industtrial Revolution[/i], beginning in 1776 with
    an effective steam engine, ignoring The Mechanical Industrial
    Revolution of 12th-13th centuries when monks built thousands of wind
    mills and water mills over Europe and Britain (cited in "The Medieval
    Machine: The Industrial Revolution of the Middle Ages", J. Gimpel.
    Also ignoring The Electrical Industrial Revolution<, beginning in 1880
    when Thomas Edison wired the streets of NYC. Ignoring The Electronic
    Industrial Revolution, beginning with 1920's radio stations. And
    The Photonic-Nanotech Industrial Revolution, begun recently.
    Really. I know of no serious historian who would disagree with the notion that there have been several 'revolutions'. The simplification into an 'Industrial Revolution' is exactly that - a simplification. The degree of division into mini-revolutions will depend upon the focus of the historian. If she is interested in the role of afro-americans in WW1 then your subdivisions have likely zero relevance.
    Quote Originally Posted by jonhays
    Today's Americans and Media mavens ignore Sam Slater (1768-1835), Father of the American Industrial Revolution, whose inventiveness founded the first major American industry: textiles. (Wikipedia has this.)
    So he isn't beingignored, is he. Every country could make a list of individuals who contributed greatly to their country's past, but are now largely forgotten. This is not symptomatic of some grand malaise, but merely an indication of the passage of time.
    Quote Originally Posted by jonhays
    ...America's two largest gun-firms are now owned by British interests,
    a fact ignored by The National Rifle Association as well as by
    Americans and Media mavens.
    What make you think that is important? There are plenty of businesses in the UK owned by American companies. I am a UK citizen, but have spent the bulk of my working life employed by an American company, working at one time or another in a dozen countries around the world. Why do you see this as a problem?
    Quote Originally Posted by jonhays
    Does any one care about this hidden slavery and its effect upon our lives?
    You have not demonstrated that it is slavery in any form or fashion. All you have done is state that we (Or rather Americans and media Mavens. Isn't that a rather quaint term?) fail to recognise our inventors. I was amused that as an example of that failure you cite Albert Einstein, one of the most recognised names and faces on the planet. On balance I find your thesis poorly argued, full of inconsistencies and consequently unconvincing.
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  8. #7  
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    I can only speak about America, My definition of slavery is that of Lincoln. Do you disagree with that definition? See Wikipedia for the tragic story of Edwin H. Armstrong, sometimes called "Father of American Radio".
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  9. #8  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Wow! Talk about thread necromancy. Have you been ill? I hesitated to post lest I have to wait three years for a reply, but I'll take a small chance. Opiolite seemed to have some valid points and questions. Would you like to address those first?
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  10. #9  
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    I love open criticism,We are all slaves of something if not we would be throwing sticks and stones at each other.
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