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Thread: US Election

  1. #101  
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    How is that whenever looking at the final results for a US election it reminds of the American cival war being played out at the ballot box, perhaps something to do with the Republicans taking most of confederacy and very little of the black vote I wonder.
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  2. #102  
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    if accidentally reading the American Thinker had such a bad effect on you, perhaps you need some sort of counselling, after all, it is only words through a key board. The American Thinker is a very popular web site, and being politically correct is not a course of concern on this web site.
    Accidentally refers to the fact I was following a reasonable, even highly intellectual, education discussion elsewhere which had a link to a site which turned out to be a sewer of vile, absolutely foul, racist filth. If you think that that referring to black people and the Obama family in particular as monkeys, or as intellectually inferior, or other terms I won't repeat, should be permitted in the name of freeze peach, then I'll willingly condemn such a warped interpretation of 'free speech' that prides itself on saying things that civilised people should be profoundly ashamed of.

    I certainly wouldn't allow anyone to say such things in my home, and I'd not hold back from telling people they should refrain from saying such things in my presence anywhere else. I might have a vocabulary as bad as any sailor in vigorous face to face conversation, but I wouldn't convey such disgusting sentiments in any form of language.

    Not being concerned about being politically correct is one thing. Willingly participating in debased conversation - and encouraging others to display the very worst of themselves - is another thing entirely. It's not me who needs counselling, I fancy
    adelady, what ever you say does not alter the fact, that the American Thinker is a popular web site. America is divided by race, and the recent American elections has proven this to be the case.
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  3. #103  
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    perhaps something to do with the Republicans taking most of confederacy and very little of the black vote I wonder.
    It's a bit more complicated than that. The southern Democrats were the anti-black party - until the Kennedys and Johnson supported Civil Rights. Johnson knew when he signed the Act that he was consigning his own party's southern states support into history. Then along came Reagan and converted a whole lot of traditional Democrat working class voters into near lifelong Republican voters all over the country.

    The big change in US voting patterns is being driven by demographics. Young people aren't strongly attracted to them in anything like the numbers that they go to the Dems. And women have always been more strongly convinced by social justice type policies than men, though that's not just a US thing.

    Be interesting to watch the next couple of elections I reckon. The teapartiers may have blown it entirely, but that won't show up definitely one way or the other until the people who've been elected since the big reaction against Obama come up for reelection in the various cycles in the states, Reps and Senate.
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  4. #104  
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    adelady, what ever you say does not alter the fact, that the American Thinker is a popular web site. America is divided by race, and the recent American elections has proven this to be the case.
    I know that. I just don't see how that justifies the kind of language that some people use to describe and belittle even the most talented black people. The fact that it's popular is not a recommendation.

    When I look at the same sort of thing said by people who oppose civil rights and social freedoms for women, the only places where you see rubbish equivalent to the AT racist trash talk is on some of the weirdo sites in the far corners of the world wild web. (For these purposes I'm ignoring the insulting language and rape threats that seem to amuse a lot of underdeveloped male minds on games and blogs.)
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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  5. #105  
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    adelady, what ever you say does not alter the fact, that the American Thinker is a popular web site. America is divided by race, and the recent American elections has proven this to be the case.
    I know that. I just don't see how that justifies the kind of language that some people use to describe and belittle even the most talented black people. The fact that it's popular is not a recommendation.

    When I look at the same sort of thing said by people who oppose civil rights and social freedoms for women, the only places where you see rubbish equivalent to the AT racist trash talk is on some of the weirdo sites in the far corners of the world wild web. (For these purposes I'm ignoring the insulting language and rape threats that seem to amuse a lot of underdeveloped male minds on games and blogs.)
    OK adelady, point taken.
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  6. #106  
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    Dave, I spotted this. And it raised a vague memory - I don't recall any women on AT - at least on the threads that offended me.

    Women favored Obama by 11 points while men backed Romney by 7; the gender gap has been bigger just once, in 2000 (when men were +11 Bush and women were +11 Gore). Add in marital status and the gaps become garish:
    Married men for Romney by 60-38 percent;
    unmarried women (younger, more Democratic, more aligned with Obama on social and role-of-government issues) backed the incumbent by 67-31 percent.

    Overall, young people by and large stayed the course with Obama, supporting him by 60-37 percent. While that was down from a record 34-point rout in this group in 2008, it still was a wide margin, and under-30s roughly matched their turnout of four years ago.
    from A Draw on the Economy, a Win on Empathy – and the Face of a Changing Nation - ABC News

    There are a whole heap of other statistics, not presented the way I like them. Are there really people who find statistics easier to read if they're embedded into differently structured comparisons in sentences that don't obviously relate to each other?
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  7. #107  
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    Dave, I spotted this. And it raised a vague memory - I don't recall any women on AT - at least on the threads that offended me.

    Women favored Obama by 11 points while men backed Romney by 7; the gender gap has been bigger just once, in 2000 (when men were +11 Bush and women were +11 Gore). Add in marital status and the gaps become garish:
    Married men for Romney by 60-38 percent;
    unmarried women (younger, more Democratic, more aligned with Obama on social and role-of-government issues) backed the incumbent by 67-31 percent.

    Overall, young people by and large stayed the course with Obama, supporting him by 60-37 percent. While that was down from a record 34-point rout in this group in 2008, it still was a wide margin, and under-30s roughly matched their turnout of four years ago.
    from A Draw on the Economy, a Win on Empathy – and the Face of a Changing Nation - ABC News

    There are a whole heap of other statistics, not presented the way I like them. Are there really people who find statistics easier to read if they're embedded into differently structured comparisons in sentences that don't obviously relate to each other?
    I have read your link, it is very hard going.
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  8. #108  
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    The big change in US voting patterns is being driven by demographics. Young people aren't strongly attracted to them in anything like the numbers that they go to the Dems. And women have always been more strongly convinced by social justice type policies than men, though that's not just a US thing.

    Be interesting to watch the next couple of elections I reckon. The teapartiers may have blown it entirely, but that won't show up definitely one way or the other until the people who've been elected since the big reaction against Obama come up for reelection in the various cycles in the states, Reps and Senate.
    I think it's got some similarity here, young people being pretty much lefties either in the lib dem or labour camps. What tends to happen though is as they grow up and get a bit of cash many tend to drift towards conservatism. Though that said immigration is still a big issue here, just like in the states here most immigrants tend to vote for the left which makes it much harder for right wing parties to get elected. I think whilst ever the Republicans can't tap into the Hispanic vote they are going to be pretty much in the same boat, what with more immigration and the traditional older wealthier whites shrinking as a percentage of America's overall population.

    Also ordinarily the fact that people are living longer should be a real boost to the Republican's, but what we are seeing is that the wealth share has become so unequal that for many as they get older they are not actually getting richer and as such a more dependant on socialist policies just to get by so this section of people are not going to be the Republican parties savior they had hoped for. No unless the Republicans can find a way where ordinary people actually do start to see their wealth increase as they get older and are not forced to spend their lives in relative poverty then this situation will only get worse. Traditionally the Republicans have relied heavily on certain sections of society remain wealthy and as such having their support, but again these sections as a percentage of American society as a whole are shinking and with it their vote support percentage.
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  9. #109  
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    It comes down to age, sex and race....all of which the republican extreme positions the last few years bode poorly for the future.

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  10. #110  
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    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    I just hope it doesn't take a hurricane to change everyone's mind toward mutual cooperation.
    Hopefully it did.

    Must say, Obama was looking very glum for quite a while. His speach after he was confirmed for a second term was the most upbeat I have seen him in a long time. Not that I follow American politics that often though.
    The Dems pretty much put the ball on a tee and gave the Reps a laser-guided bat and the Reps still wiffed. How bad does your message have to be if you can't beat the worst economic struggle in living memory?

    I sincerely hope Obama makes the most out of this and the Reps work closely with him. How things can be this screwey and Gary Johnson still can't get double digit percentage demostrates to me that people aren't REALLY interested in change...
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  11. #111  
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    Gary Johnson? For Team America?


    Just kidding. I hope for the best for you guys. In the mean time, I'll hope to make enough money to blow this country before I get murdered in my sleep.
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

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  12. #112  
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    How things can be this screwey and Gary Johnson still can't get double digit percentage demostrates to me that people aren't REALLY interested in change...
    What if they're really, really keen on change ..... of an entirely different kind from what Johnson is offering?
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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  13. #113  
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    Juliani phrased it well when he said: @
    If the republican party wishes to stay a viable political force, they need to get back to being
    conservative on finances
    conservative on foreign affairs
    conservative on the military
    and libertarian on all social issues

    Pandering to right wing religious nutjobs may garner a few southern and rural state's votes, but ain't a good map for the future of the party.
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  14. #114  
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    How things can be this screwey and Gary Johnson still can't get double digit percentage demostrates to me that people aren't REALLY interested in change...
    What if they're really, really keen on change ..... of an entirely different kind from what Johnson is offering?
    I'm not sure what kind of actual change that would be. What is this dream that Mr. Obama is supposed to be offering us? It seems a lot like Mr. Romney's sans the absurd social legislation issue.

    I guess my problem is that I don't really see the greatness of either party right now. However, I'm not afraid of the Dems like I am the Reps (social legislation scares me) so I certainly think the Dems are the party of progress (not to mention every other sentiment from the Reps is about how the good old days are gone). I'm just fuzzy on what this picture is that is supposedly being painted for us. All I've seen is a continuation of global conflict spearheaded by the US, massive and poorly prioritized spending, expansion of the federal government, and a complete lack of cooperation at the governmental level.
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    What social legislation are you referring to?
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    [QUOTE=Flick Montana;365435 All I've seen is a continuation of global conflict spearheaded by the US, massive and poorly prioritized spending, expansion of the federal government, and a complete lack of cooperation at the governmental level.[/QUOTE]

    Maybe, just maybe, It's all just smoke and mirrors.
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    expansion of the federal government,
    That's in large part a myth made up by the Tea Party. As a % of the work force the US government has continued to decrease in size every decade since the 1940s. Spending has also been quite flat the past 3-4 years--the small increases that exist in the Department of Defense, Veterans administration, and Department of Homeland Security. Even most of the federal regulatory framework is non-biding and could be ignored if States were willing to turn back the small federal contributions to things like the 10% education funding.
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  18. #118  
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    Education funding? Worth looking at how people seem to vote with more education.


    from Election Infographic Shows Most Educated States Voted For Obama | Happy Place

    I wish there was a similar graphic from earlier years. I'm pretty sure that the scientific community, at least in the fifties and sixties, of that time was more inclined to vote Republican. Though I suppose it'd be hard to pick out where they were. And maybe the US isn't like Australia in yet another respect.
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  19. #119  
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    comparing todays republicans to AuH20 republicans
    is like comparing moonshine to sunshine
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  20. #120  
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    Education is bull shit.

    Better to look to those who didn't vote if you are looking for those with intelligence, real life experience, and a better general understanding for the state of the world. Non-educated vote for appeal, and educated vote for style/ego. Non-voters are trying to live well and therefore have no need for a self regulating society and no time for bad entertainment.
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  21. #121  
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    Huh?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Huh?
    Seconded!
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  23. #123  
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaBOB View Post
    Education is bull shit.

    Better to look to those who didn't vote if you are looking for those with intelligence, real life experience, and a better general understanding for the state of the world. Non-educated vote for appeal, and educated vote for style/ego. Non-voters are trying to live well and therefore have no need for a self regulating society and no time for bad entertainment.
    Well I'm not going to go and vote for a police commissioner, this is because I really have no idea of who's who, there's been absolutely no publicity that actually gave me any information about the candidates, as far as I can see they arn't actually going to do anything anyway and they don't actually have any power. So to me voting in this election would be just a waste of time. When it comes to voting in council and general elections though that is different as I actually feel my vote makes a difference and I actually understand what the different politicians are about. Is it really that people feel so disaffected that stops them from voting or just a more general apathy to politics as a whole. Perhaps Australia has got it right with compulsory voting, at least then it would force people to consider the issues, and also force the powers that be make issues that are relevant to people's lives across all sections of society.
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  24. #124  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisgorlitz View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DaBOB View Post
    Education is bull shit.

    Better to look to those who didn't vote if you are looking for those with intelligence, real life experience, and a better general understanding for the state of the world. Non-educated vote for appeal, and educated vote for style/ego. Non-voters are trying to live well and therefore have no need for a self regulating society and no time for bad entertainment.
    Well I'm not going to go and vote for a police commissioner, this is because I really have no idea of who's who, there's been absolutely no publicity that actually gave me any information about the candidates, as far as I can see they arn't actually going to do anything anyway and they don't actually have any power. So to me voting in this election would be just a waste of time. When it comes to voting in council and general elections though that is different as I actually feel my vote makes a difference and I actually understand what the different politicians are about. Is it really that people feel so disaffected that stops them from voting or just a more general apathy to politics as a whole. Perhaps Australia has got it right with compulsory voting, at least then it would force people to consider the issues, and also force the powers that be make issues that are relevant to people's lives across all sections of society.
    Is that right? You have to vote in Australia? I don't think that's a very good answer. Why would you want people who didn't care or want to vote to make an uninformed difference?

    Actually I think Washington is doing it right. Everybody can vote by mail. You don't have to wait in line at a polling place. You get to take your time filling out the ballot then you put it back in the mail. What could be easier.
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  25. #125  
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    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Is that right? You have to vote in Australia? I don't think that's a very good answer. Why would you want people who didn't care or want to vote to make an uninformed difference?

    Actually I think Washington is doing it right. Everybody can vote by mail. You don't have to wait in line at a polling place. You get to take your time filling out the ballot then you put it back in the mail. What could be easier.
    Hey you could well be right, I only found out about Australia's compulsory voting from reading Adelady's posts, and I guess no one really wants to be queing for ages. I don't actually mind voting normally because queing doesn't take barely a couple of minutes and if I get the timing right can usually go down the pub afterwoods with my neighbours. I don't normally actually drink that much but now and again it's rather nice.
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  26. #126  
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    You have to vote in Australia? I don't think that's a very good answer.
    I don't see why not. In Australia we don't see voting as an optional right or a privilege that we can choose to ignore or to take advantage of.

    It's the one and only obligation of Australian citizenship.

    It's easy and straightforward. There are no prescribed polling places for particular voters, you can go to any one you want or need to on the day. You can get postal votes in advance for virtually any reason at all. If you happen to be away from home on polling day, even interstate or overseas, you can lodge an 'absentee' vote at any polling place you come across. (Though overseas you have to find an embassy or consulate.) Practically every school hall, church hall or town hall you pass in Australia will be a polling booth. Voting is optional for local councils. These elections are not held at the same time as state or federal elections.

    Remember, we only vote for parliaments as a rule. We very occasionally, seldom, have referendums. And we certainly don't vote for legal officers or dog catchers or sheriffs or the like. We rely on professionals to select the best people for those jobs based on merit, not on political advertising.
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  27. #127  
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    Quote Originally Posted by adelady View Post
    You have to vote in Australia? I don't think that's a very good answer.
    I don't see why not. In Australia we don't see voting as an optional right or a privilege that we can choose to ignore or to take advantage of.

    It's the one and only obligation of Australian citizenship.

    It's easy and straightforward. There are no prescribed polling places for particular voters, you can go to any one you want or need to on the day. You can get postal votes in advance for virtually any reason at all. If you happen to be away from home on polling day, even interstate or overseas, you can lodge an 'absentee' vote at any polling place you come across. (Though overseas you have to find an embassy or consulate.) Practically every school hall, church hall or town hall you pass in Australia will be a polling booth. Voting is optional for local councils. These elections are not held at the same time as state or federal elections.

    Remember, we only vote for parliaments as a rule. We very occasionally, seldom, have referendums. And we certainly don't vote for legal officers or dog catchers or sheriffs or the like. We rely on professionals to select the best people for those jobs based on merit, not on political advertising.
    Yes they do get carried away with voting the small jobs over here. However I've never voted for a dog catcher before. Another thing they do here is when you register to vote they put you on the jury selection list. I hate jury duty.
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  28. #128  
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    Quote Originally Posted by pogomutt View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    The Republican party has sadly gone out its way to disenfranchise women and minorities in recent decades. .
    Explain your bigotry. I'm all ears. If I could, I'd pass your comment on to the 54% of Hispanic voters in my congressional district who voted Republican two years ago. They bounced a Hispanic Democrat and replaced him with one of those "old white men", a Republican. The only people my party has "disenfranchised" are morons, bigots, and race-baiters, people who'd make blanket statements like the one quoted above.


    Hispanics who vote republican are sell outs. They turned their backs, on all of the worlds people.
    And they back stabbed every decent white person, African American, and (real) South American in the back.

    They sold out their country's, their people, and their friends. So they could stick their noses, up greedy rich (WHITE) men's butt's.

    They support a political party, that try's to stop South Americans from coming to America.
    They support a political party, were most members, would rather die, before the US government gave money, to South Americas poor people.
    They protect the US corporations, that go to South America, and steal South Americas resources.
    They support the US corporations, that let out so much pollution in South America, that it kills their fellow country people.

    These republican Hispanics voted for Mitt Romney, when he wanted to add $8 trillion dollars, to Americas national debt.
    Their republican brains can't understand, that Americas economy and South Americas economy are closely conneted. And if Romney got what he wanted, Americas debt-to-GDP would have been 150%.
    A debt-to-GDP ratio of 150%, is (not) good for an economy.


    And Hispanic men who vote republican, are no longer real men.
    Real men protect, respect, and care for women and children.

    But they support a political party, that is against Americas government, feeding hungry American children.
    They support a political party, that kills 20,000 American women each year, by withholding health insurance from them.

    Hispanic republican men, are (not) men. They need to take their noses, out the greedy rich (white) men's butts. And try to act like real men, instead of sellout freaks.


    If you can, please pass on my comments, to the 54% of Hispanic voters in your congressional district, who voted Republican two years ago.

    Thank you,
    Chad.


    p.s.

    This is for your ears too.
    Last edited by chad; November 16th, 2012 at 08:29 PM.
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  29. #129  
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    And Hispanic men who vote republican, are no longer real men. Real men protect, respect, and care for women and children.
    I expect that Hispanic men are much like other men. Other men make good and bad choices, good and bad decisions. And just like everyone else they have their own opinions, and prejudices, and wisdom, and foolishness.

    Just like other people, they also are susceptible to political rhetoric and selfish and generous impulses. There are plenty of people who apparently voted against what looks like their own best interests - they were white, and hispanic, and black, and indigenous, and old, and women, and parents. It doesn't matter. Political advertising works. Appealing to prejudice works. Singling out one particular group as being weak or foolish is a bit silly. People who are involved with a particular party might want to volunteer to help out next time in places where they think the party fell down this time.

    But don't blame voters for being voters.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
    "nature is like a game of Jenga; you never know which brick you pull out will cause the whole stack to collapse" Lucy Cooke
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  30. #130  
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    LOL. And now I'm a bigot for criticizing my own party
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  31. #131  
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    America's Hispanics will soon control, much of the United States. But they are falling into the corporate propaganda, of Americas republican party. The republican Hispanic's have lost touch with reality. But even worse they have lost touch with history.

    I grew up around South Americans, black Americans, and white Americans.

    What upsets me the most about Hispanic republicans, is the way they stab black Americans in the back. White Americans past racism towards black Americans, has forced many poor black Americans into a world, where they need welfare to survive. But today Hispanic republicans, want to join the republican party, to take away poor black Americans welfare.
    Why do these republican Hispanics, want to take away poor black Americans welfare?

    And when I think about the legal/illegal South American workers. And how the Hispanic republicans want to take away their welfare/and send them back to South America to live in poverty. It just blows my mind.

    Today white republicans, protest on street corner's with signs, and yell "go back to Mexico!!!" to South Americans.
    These Hispanic republicans want to belong to a political party, that is full of white racists.

    Dr. King once told a crowd of black people, "they have some decent white folks out there, look around you, some of them are with us today." But those words mean nothing to Hispanic republicans. But they mean something to a white democrat like me.

    We are at the point were black and white democrats, care more about Hispanics, that republican Hispanics do.

    You Hispanic republicans need to look at your wives, husbands, girlfriends, children, ex.ex., and try to care about them in politics, more than you care about lowering rich peoples taxes. We need an America were decent white people, black Americans, and South Americans, are together in a group.

    In the last few years, republicans have increased Americas national debt, from 65% to GDP, to 99% to GDP. That money was used for rich peoples tax cuts, and favors for large corporations. If Americas decent white people, black Americans, and Hispanic Americans were together in a group, they could have used those trillions of dollars, to make this country and world a better place.

    The republican propaganda, will tell you democrats are nation builders. They will say Americas government should not help this worlds poor people. But us democrats dont listen to that satanic crap. Look at Bill Clinton's charity work, look at Bill Gates charity work, and look at Warren Buffets charity work. They are democrats, they nation build in Africa. Why are you Hispanic republicans, against helping this worlds poor people?

    A black woman raised my father and uncle, and she always protected me. I (love) all the black woman I work with. And I love my South American friends mothers and sisters more than you know. And I love and respect those men too. Point is we are all human beings.

    Why not join the democrats to keep America financially stable, and make life for (all) human beings a little bit better?
    Last edited by chad; November 16th, 2012 at 10:20 AM.
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  32. #132  
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    I have many South American friends, that I grew up with.
    And I am now thinking about, how many of them love to fight.
    For any forum members like my South American friends, I am on my knees apologizing, if I offended you. I am sorry.

    But my South American friends are not republicans. Perhaps us growing up with black, white, Hispanic, and Asian people made us that way.

    My South American friends have a great love for South America, its food, its music, its boxing, its soccer, and their family and friends that live there. And from my lifes experiences, I choose to have that love for every country on Earth.


    I apolagize if I offended anyone,
    Chad.
    Last edited by chad; November 16th, 2012 at 08:35 PM.
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  33. #133  
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    In regard to the compulsory voting mentioned earlier here is my take: voting is optional, but if you choose not to vote then you are prohibited from making any comment, public or private, about how the government is performing. Breaches of this rule to incur a mandatory jail sentence. (Pubs would be equipped with automatic recording and voter detection equipment!)
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  34. #134  
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt View Post
    In regard to the compulsory voting mentioned earlier here is my take: voting is optional, but if you choose not to vote then you are prohibited from making any comment, public or private, about how the government is performing. Breaches of this rule to incur a mandatory jail sentence. (Pubs would be equipped with automatic recording and voter detection equipment!)
    Mandatory voting is a terrible way to choose a leader. Also, I think choosing not to vote is a form of voting. In the US it's more of who can win the media contest that gets the vote and that doesn't ever inspire much confidence in getting a good leader. Anyway, I tend to vote the party I like rather than the man or woman.
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  35. #135  
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt View Post
    In regard to the compulsory voting mentioned earlier here is my take: voting is optional, but if you choose not to vote then you are prohibited from making any comment, public or private, about how the government is performing. Breaches of this rule to incur a mandatory jail sentence. (Pubs would be equipped with automatic recording and voter detection equipment!)
    As arkane points out... not voting is casting a vote, or expressing an opinion. There is no logic what so ever in locking up people who do not vote for the best of a bad bunch and denying them an opinion. Whats your reasoning for this drastic step? Whats wrong with not voting or registering a vote of no confidence? and why should that incur a severe censorship of expression?

    The more I read it, the more it seems like a joke, but I sense you mean it.


    How about this?: We should be able to vote for whoever we want including ourselves, and if a person is nominated by society, to lead society, then they should be oblidged to do it. Regardless of whether they wanted to or not. That way all votes would count for something because it is truely a free unrestricted and democratic vote... then it would be more acceptable to enforce voting. That would lead to a much more democratic society surely? Realistically people will only vote on mass for somebody we felt were capable of making decisions, it could work quite well I reckon.

    I'd be interested to hear whats faults can be found in the above notion... I'm sure there's a few.

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  36. #136  
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    I like the stats, with one caveat, there's no 3rd Party afaik, not only are alternatives out of the debate, but no one even realizes when they are not shown in graphs, its like when the character in 1984 erased information about events or people that were no longer officially acknowledged to have existed, officially in the MSM its as if no 3rd part even exists. (a catch 22, not covered because they are marginal, marginal because they are not covered).


    (And its also interesting how much focus is allocated to two colors (red vs blue), and how little focus appears to be allocated to specific policies.
    Whats the % of people in favor of pulling out of Iraq? Or the % that want to end the patriot act and the various de-facto limitations of the constitution or rights, by using fear and security to justify it?)
    Last edited by icewendigo; November 19th, 2012 at 11:41 AM.
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  37. #137  
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    Quote Originally Posted by icewendigo View Post
    I like the stats, with one caveat, there's no 3rd Party afaik, not only are alternatives out of the debate, but no one even realizes when they are not shown in graphs, its like when the character in 1984 erased information about events or people that were no longer officially acknowledged to have existed, officially in the MSM its as if no 3rd part even exists. (a catch 22, not covered because they are marginal, marginal because they are not covered).


    (And its also interesting how much focus is allocated to two colors (red vs blue), and how little focus appears to be allocated to specific policies.
    Whats the % of people in favor of pulling out of Iraq? Or the % that want to end the patriot act and the various de-facto limitations of the constitution or rights, by using fear and security to justify it?)
    Good questions and I'd be glad to vote YES on both of them.
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  38. #138  
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    Ok so it said on the news the election cost $6 billion, with the popular vote percentage being 50.6% to 47.9%. I'm just wondering if it would have made any difference if they had one debate the day before the election and that's it, no campaigning, no tv ads nothing. What one maybe 2 days disruption then back to running the country and $6 billion saved.
    The only people I guess who would have been unhappy with that is the networks who would have had to find some other form of reality tv to fill their airtime.
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  39. #139  
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    With early voting becomes more popular I was surprised to see the late push.
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