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Thread: AC DC MOTOR

  1. #1 AC DC MOTOR 
    Forum Freshman monaro_waky's Avatar
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    Hey guys,
    I need to make a fairly decent electrical motor for school, I was thinking of making an AC motor as everyone is making DC. Researching on the net I found its possible to produce a phase shift using a capacitor but that's all I can find on the matter This is the site: http://www.physclips.unsw.edu.au/jw/....html#ACmotors
    I'm not sure what kind of capacitor to use, and also does anyone have any ides as to what kind of rotating shaft to use, I was thinking a strong piece of thin material like a pencil with current running in opposite directions on each side of it, would that be enough for it to start turning?

    Any help is greatly appreciated thanks


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  3. #2  
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    ... as everyone is making DC.
    They are wisely making DC motors because (I assume) their power supplies are batteries. Their motors can now be small and lightweight and they need take no special safety precautions.

    Where will you get your AC? Do you intend to just plug your device into the wall? That's just asking for trouble.

    We can still advise but you must first give us a better idea of your power source and your electrical controls and safety precautions.

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  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman monaro_waky's Avatar
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    Hi,
    Sory I forgot to add that info, the power source is the mains but I have added in a transformer I found from a pack of Christmas lights that outputs 12.5V, that's about as far as I got with the power and safety of it all, obviously no uncovered wires and prety much heaps of layers of electrical tape on connections, but any other safety ideas i would realy appreciate. An alternative for the power source are power packs that the school can provide which output from 2 to 12V AC.

    thanks
    There are no such things as applied sciences, only applications of science.
    Louis Pasteur (1822 - 1895)
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by monaro_waky
    Hi,
    Sory I forgot to add that info, the power source is the mains but I have added in a transformer I found from a pack of Christmas lights that outputs 12.5V, that's about as far as I got with the power and safety of it all, obviously no uncovered wires and prety much heaps of layers of electrical tape on connections, but any other safety ideas i would realy appreciate. An alternative for the power source are power packs that the school can provide which output from 2 to 12V AC.

    thanks

    You can get a nice sine wave or, AC wave form, looking like a sine wave, from a single transistor, a capacitor and a Transformer in series.

    Your voltage is going to be too low to power an AC motor in my opinion. But to create AC, I use a resistor between the power from the battery, marked (+) and the gate.
    I take a wire and setpot, from the secondary of the transformer. The wire from the secondary that creates an abundance of electrons marked (-), with the initial actuation of the transistor. When the transistor engages the secondary charges, and shuts off the transistor with an abundance of electrons to the gate that over powers the resistor from the battery. With the setpot you can adjust your wave form. An oscilloscope is important though. Or you can use a light bulb. The most equal will usually give you the best brightest output.

    I have been meaning to build a one watt DC motor for a while. It should be easy to do.

    You create a wheel with those small magnets you see advertised here, placed all in the same way. North facing out and away from the wheel, all around the wheel.

    Then you mount one more magnet outside the wheel in a stationary mount also with north facing away from the wheel. Then just take a thick piece of wire, that will carry about one amp, from your "D" batteries in parallel. And energize it between the magnets. I have never done this. So I do not know if it will work without pulsing the power. I suspect it might though. If not a transistor and small shoe to work the gate will.

    I will see if I have any information on the phenomena.

    Another cool motor is the copper disc, that you apply power to the shaft that holds the disc mechanically so it can spin, and also apply power to the outside of the disk with a shoe. It is a motor and generator.

    Here is the one about the copper disc.
    http://www.Rockwelder.com/EastWood/GM/GM.html

    I have some more but it might take time to find and scan them in.


    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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  6. #5  
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    Low power single phase motors tend to be shaded pole types with squirrel-cage rotors.
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