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Thread: Electricity

  1. #1 Electricity 
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    Looking at its characteristics, electricity to me seems to be nothing more than linear heat.

    Normal heat moves chaotically in all directions, while electrons move in only one direction. Electrons are only a special (In terms of what they can do) part of the atom that can move from one atom to the next easily.

    What we we call "electricity" is nothing more than part of the atom moving from one spot to the other very readily, that possesses characteristics we utilize to create photons and drive motors, etc...

    I think most people have a misconception as to what electricity really is. They believe it is special in terms of its makeup and only happens to reside in its orbital around atoms.

    "The electron is currently described as a fundamental or elementary particle. It has no known substructure." -Wiki

    "The electron has spin ½ and is a fermion" -Wiki


    To me, when you see electricity ark across the air, all you are seeing is matter shooting form one point to the other creating photons in between.

    Correct me if I'm wrong.


    Of all the wonders in the universe, none is likely more fascinating and complicated than human nature.

    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe."

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  3. #2 Re: Electricity 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Fusion
    Looking at its characteristics, electricity to me seems to be nothing more than linear heat.

    Normal heat moves chaotically in all directions, while electrons move in only one direction. Electrons are only a special (In terms of what they can do) part of the atom that can move from one atom to the next easily.

    What we we call "electricity" is nothing more than part of the atom moving from one spot to the other very readily, that possesses characteristics we utilize to create photons and drive motors, etc...

    I think most people have a misconception as to what electricity really is. They believe it is special in terms of its makeup and only happens to reside in its orbital around atoms.

    "The electron is currently described as a fundamental or elementary particle. It has no known substructure." -Wiki

    "The electron has spin ½ and is a fermion" -Wiki


    To me, when you see electricity ark across the air, all you are seeing is matter shooting form one point to the other creating photons in between.

    Correct me if I'm wrong.

    I never called electrons matter in their sub-atomic form. Only when they are in balls called protons/atoms of hydrogen, do I call them matter.

    They are just ambient radiation to me in pure electron form, electricity basically.

    Even the multi particle scientists originally started out calling ambient radiation and cosmic radiation electrons. And even rated it in millions of volts. But their faulty footing and poor basics caused them to even throw out their interesting experiments.

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    They are just ambient radiation to me in pure electron form, electricity basically.
    What is ambient radiation and why do you blame every fact of physics on it?!
    Beyond Equations,

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    has ambient radiation ever been experimentally verified?
    when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth
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    He is very sinical of decent physics, he seems to believe they are wrong he is right and refuses to even consider them being correct. That is what religion does to some people.

    He claims it has been proven and fails to provide evidence, as his amazing evidnce for universal scientists which can 'do anything' yet none can even be named.

    I would not recommend you listening to his waffle, it is purely made up and should not be taken seriously untill he can provide some decent proof.
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  7. #6 Re: Electricity 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Fusion
    Looking at its characteristics, electricity to me seems to be nothing more than linear heat.

    Normal heat moves chaotically in all directions, while electrons move in only one direction.
    Heat doesn't move chaotically although it may seem so in a large body or a non-solid medium. It always flows in the direction of a temperature gradient, which is analogous to a voltage gradient in electrical circuits. In a fluid medium things are complicated by convection, so the heat flow may take a circuitous path but you can still predict where it will go. Heat transfer is often explained in terms of an electrical analogy, but they are not the same thing.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edmund
    He is very sinical of decent physics, he seems to believe they are wrong he is right and refuses to even consider them being correct. That is what religion does to some people.

    He claims it has been proven and fails to provide evidence, as his amazing evidnce for universal scientists which can 'do anything' yet none can even be named.

    I would not recommend you listening to his waffle, it is purely made up and should not be taken seriously untill he can provide some decent proof.
    I am totally against decent science. And I do not believe we have decent science. We have industrial battles that often yield interesting gadgets.

    Scientists striving for perfection can get indecent, if they have to, to further the perfection of science.

    I have posted about twenty different links to books about ether. It was the method and understanding they used to isolate the elements. Benjamin Franklin described it well. He just termed the particles of electricity, the electric fluid, with the explanation that the particles flowed like a fluid. Note he said like a fluid. And they do. Right through matter. That is 90 percent space or was.

    Of course with Benjamin Franklin technology, anyone can disassemble Washington DC if they feel that they are not getting the proper Satisfaction George Washington thought was our duty, to make sure we receive from our servants, as he called himself and other representatives.

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    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    I have posted about twenty different links to books about ether. It was the method and understanding they used to isolate the elements. Benjamin Franklin described it well. He just termed the particles of electricity, the electric fluid, with the explanation that the particles flowed like a fluid. Note he said like a fluid. And they do. Right through matter. That is 90 percent space or was.
    Did Ben have an explanation for the photoelectric effect? No, I didn't think so.

    Of course with Benjamin Franklin technology, anyone can disassemble Washington DC if they feel that they are not getting the proper Satisfaction
    You, Sir, are a kook.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370
    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    I have posted about twenty different links to books about ether. It was the method and understanding they used to isolate the elements. Benjamin Franklin described it well. He just termed the particles of electricity, the electric fluid, with the explanation that the particles flowed like a fluid. Note he said like a fluid. And they do. Right through matter. That is 90 percent space or was.
    Did Ben have an explanation for the photoelectric effect? No, I didn't think so.

    Of course with Benjamin Franklin technology, anyone can disassemble Washington DC if they feel that they are not getting the proper Satisfaction
    You, Sir, are a kook.

    Yea, he thought that everything was electrons.


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    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    Yea, he thought that everything was electrons.
    You don't even know what the photoelectric effect is, do you Billy? Ben Franklin didn't think anything about it because it wasn't known at the time. And, you can't explain it with 18th century science.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370
    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    Yea, he thought that everything was electrons.
    You don't even know what the photoelectric effect is, do you Billy? Ben Franklin didn't think anything about it because it wasn't known at the time. And, you can't explain it with 18th century science.
    From what I read about it. It was a misunderstanding of 1800's science.


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    Heat doesn't move chaotically although it may seem so in a large body or a non-solid medium. It always flows in the direction of a temperature gradient, which is analogous to a voltage gradient in electrical circuits. In a fluid medium things are complicated by convection, so the heat flow may take a circuitous path but you can still predict where it will go. Heat transfer is often explained in terms of an electrical analogy, but they are not the same thing.
    Not chaotically through a medium, only chaotically in itself through its heat, meaning that it is vibrating and therefore moving around in many directions constantly at extremely high velocities.

    I was not creating a full analogy of heat that included thermodynamics. The heat part only comes from the idea that both are moving matter, the only difference being the fact that electrons can possess linear heat (going in one general direction as a means of movement) while protons seem not to (at least usually).

    Up to this point I thought of electricity as an element of its own that just happened to derive its material from electrons. I thought electricity was ELECTRICITY. Its hard to explain....but my mindset has changed; I feel like I truly know what it is now after examining the processes for enough time.
    Of all the wonders in the universe, none is likely more fascinating and complicated than human nature.

    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Fusion
    Heat doesn't move chaotically although it may seem so in a large body or a non-solid medium. It always flows in the direction of a temperature gradient, which is analogous to a voltage gradient in electrical circuits. In a fluid medium things are complicated by convection, so the heat flow may take a circuitous path but you can still predict where it will go. Heat transfer is often explained in terms of an electrical analogy, but they are not the same thing.
    Not chaotically through a medium, only chaotically in itself through its heat, meaning that it is vibrating and therefore moving around in many directions constantly at extremely high velocities.

    I was not creating a full analogy of heat that included thermodynamics. The heat part only comes from the idea that both are moving matter, the only difference being the fact that electrons can possess linear heat (going in one general direction as a means of movement) while protons seem not to (at least usually).

    Up to this point I thought of electricity as an element of its own that just happened to derive its material from electrons. I thought electricity was ELECTRICITY. Its hard to explain....but my mindset has changed; I feel like I truly know what it is now after examining the processes for enough time.
    If you heat a half inch aluminum plate about 20 inches long by about three inches wide, on one end to about 800 degrees. And hold said plate in hand by the cool end, while dipping the plate in water. You can note that the heat does not run into the cold water.

    The heat runs up the aluminum plate, and you scream like a women. I have seen this happen. Not to me or anything. Ha-ha.

    But this is well known to those that work with hot aluminum, especially welders. It also works with a chilling block, like a large vise. Other metals work differently.


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  15. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick

    If you heat a half inch aluminum plate about 20 inches long by about three inches wide, on one end to about 800 degrees. And hold said plate in hand by the cool end, while dipping the plate in water. You can note that the heat does not run into the cold water.

    The heat runs up the aluminum plate, and you scream like a women. I have seen this happen. Not to me or anything. Ha-ha.
    If the heat is moving in the direction of the temperature gradient, then it will move towards both the hand and the water as these are both temperature gradients, Billy.
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    I was not creating a full analogy of heat that included thermodynamics. The heat part only comes from the idea that both are moving matter, the only difference being the fact that electrons can possess linear heat (going in one general direction as a means of movement) while protons seem not to (at least usually).
    Remember that heat is DEFINED as energy transferred as a result of a temperature difference. This has nothing to do with electricity.
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    Quote Originally Posted by (Q)
    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick

    If you heat a half inch aluminum plate about 20 inches long by about three inches wide, on one end to about 800 degrees. And hold said plate in hand by the cool end, while dipping the plate in water. You can note that the heat does not run into the cold water.

    The heat runs up the aluminum plate, and you scream like a women. I have seen this happen. Not to me or anything. Ha-ha.
    If the heat is moving in the direction of the temperature gradient, then it will move towards both the hand and the water as these are both temperature gradients, Billy.
    The heat in aluminum, runs from the cold water. To the cold end of the aluminum and burns your hand in a split second. I can hold the same part for a rather long time, and not burn my hand. Yet if I dunk the aluminum in the cold water. The heat races up the aluminum to your hand. In under a second.

    This is another one you have to try for yourself. My father under his supervision when I was a rather young boy. Let me do this and burn myself. Just so I would remember it. It is amazing.

    Even knowing it sometimes it gets you. You can severely injure yourself if you do not know this and work with aluminum. It is no joke.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bunbury
    I was not creating a full analogy of heat that included thermodynamics. The heat part only comes from the idea that both are moving matter, the only difference being the fact that electrons can possess linear heat (going in one general direction as a means of movement) while protons seem not to (at least usually).
    Remember that heat is DEFINED as energy transferred as a result of a temperature difference. This has nothing to do with electricity.
    It is electricity. A heated part has an abundance of electrons in the core. A very cold part has a shortage of electrons in the core.

    When aluminum is quickly cooled, it apparently creates a diode within itself, and directs electrons away from the cooling effect. This can very quickly cause heat to spread across the part.

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    You may need broadband for this. Or try the Windows media player files at the bottom of this post. You can download them.

    In this first movie I just heat aluminum up, and let it transfer heat up to the thermocouple. It rises about two to three degrees a second. It takes about 50 seconds to get from 95 degrees Fahrenheit to 180 degrees Fahrenheit.

    http://www.Rockwelder.com/Flash/Heat...tTransfer1.htm

    Next I heat the aluminum pretty much the same way. And then quench the aluminum in water. The water is in a deep bucket and is only about two inches from the thermocouple when I totally quench it.
    Yet you can see that the heat would rather run up to the thermocouple then into the cold water, and rather quickly. It takes about 31 seconds to go from 95 to 180 degrees. While being quenched in ice cold water just two inches from the thermocouple.

    http://www.Rockwelder.com/Flash/Temp...atureRise2.htm


    Aluminum gives off a nasty heat. It is different, then heat from iron or stainless steel. When we weld large aluminum parts, we will often quench them in water. So we can continue to work on them. Sometimes the parts can surprise you when the heat suddenly runs up to your hand.

    Iron would start to cool and pull the heat into the water. Not spread it further.

    These are Windows Media player files. If they do not play correctly you can download them and play them locally.

    http://www.Rockwelder.com/WMV/temper...aturerise1.wmv
    http://www.Rockwelder.com/WMV/temper...aturerise2.wmv



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    When aluminum is quickly cooled, it apparently creates a diode within itself, and directs electrons away from the cooling effect. This can very quickly cause heat to spread across the part.
    Without an electric potential difference electrons move randomly. Some "hot" electrons move toward the cold end and an equal number of "cold" ones move toward the hot end. The net movement of electrons is zero, while the temperature tends to even out.

    In the case of an electric potential difference the electrons move en masse in one direction.

    Both phenomena involve electrons (in a metal) but the behavior of the electrons is different in each case.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bunbury
    When aluminum is quickly cooled, it apparently creates a diode within itself, and directs electrons away from the cooling effect. This can very quickly cause heat to spread across the part.
    Without an electric potential difference electrons move randomly. Some "hot" electrons move toward the cold end and an equal number of "cold" ones move toward the hot end. The net movement of electrons is zero, while the temperature tends to even out.

    In the case of an electric potential difference the electrons move en masse in one direction.

    Both phenomena involve electrons (in a metal) but the behavior of the electrons is different in each case.
    The cooling effect on the aluminum causes the electrons, or heat, to move away from the quenching aluminum, with new found vigor.

    I believe what is taking place is that there is an abundance of electrons created in the aluminum just in front of the cold quenching effect. This abundance of electrons creates heat in the part, faster then if it was left to cool by itself. The cold water actually moves the heat towards the other end of the aluminum rather then acting as a heat sink.

    This excess heat given off, by the more quickly heated dry part, removes more heat so you do not get as much heat in the part. However the amount of heat that can be achieved in a short period of time is amazing.

    Working with hot metal since I was a kid, you learn to know your metals transfer rates. Or you walk around with ugly blisters that can get infected. I was comfortable with aluminum and how it communicated heat, or so I thought. That is when my father decided I needed a little lesson. Your hand is an even better sensor for heat. Ha-ha.

    I did not blister, I just screamed like a women. Ha-ha.

    I am sure that steam accidents can occur if you do not understand this.


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    William,

    Goodbye. Enjoy your fantasy world.

    Bunbury.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bunbury
    William,

    Goodbye. Enjoy your fantasy world.

    Bunbury.

    What are you referring to?

    Did you see the two movies?


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    I think that this discussion is complete nonsense. You can't connect heat and electricity as one single phenomenon since both are quite different.

    Heat is conducted due to vibration of atoms of the conductor, while electricity is conducted due to flowing of loose electrons through the conductor.

    Heat is produced while electricity is conducted since electrons collide with atoms of the conductor.

    Heat conduction follows a principle analogous to Ohm's Law in Electricity, but heat and electricity are very different from each other.
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    Thats why I called it linear heat, a special type of heat. If you can think of a better term, fine then, but my main point is that people have a misconception about the nature of electricity, and that it should have an alternate word used to describe it.

    I am not as much talking about the people on this forum, but the general public. People take for granted the fact that when an electric ark is formed, matter, not "electricity" is shooting through the air. Electricity is the nature of the electrons and how they move, but electrons are not electricity.
    Of all the wonders in the universe, none is likely more fascinating and complicated than human nature.

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    If you want to call it linear heat then you will also have to change the definition of heat. Read the definition, then ask yourself if it applies to electricity.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PritishKamat
    I think that this discussion is complete nonsense. You can't connect heat and electricity as one single phenomenon since both are quite different.

    Heat is conducted due to vibration of atoms of the conductor, while electricity is conducted due to flowing of loose electrons through the conductor.

    Heat is produced while electricity is conducted since electrons collide with atoms of the conductor.

    Heat conduction follows a principle analogous to Ohm's Law in Electricity, but heat and electricity are very different from each other.
    That is somewhat true, and somewhat what you have been told.

    Heat and electricity are one. Both are electrons. Heat is not actually created by vibrating atoms. Heat is created by slowing ambient radiation, this may cause atoms to vibrate at a certain rate. However, heat is just ambient radiation, being slowed to make it perceivable as heat.

    The best hottest bombs use electricity in an abundance to block ambient radiation, to create massive heat from zero combustion, in a fraction of a second. Just super high disintegrative voltage at the core.

    Once something is hot, it seems to store the heat. At least for a while. Much like static electricity.
    However it is just storing an abundance of electrons that perpetuate to some extent the abundance of electrons, to maintain a slowing of ambient radiation to continue the heat rays, which are rays of electrons.

    Matter is a filter, a blocker, an accelerator, a diode. Ambient radiation is the power or more technically the velocity.

    There is more then enough proof of this from factory accidents. Where heat installed into an object being manufactured, went super nova. The part should have cooled off according to multi particle science. Yet the part escalated to destruction. Because it was to much of a block to ambient radiation.

    Large plastic vats and epoxy vats, have seen this similar effect. It is well known that volume to surface area play a role in dissipating heat. But there is more to it then just that.

    But since formulas that would work, would show a massive increase in energy created with volume. They tend not to have proper formulas for such things. Regular products can create the nuclear pile effect, with volume. Which just blocks ambient radiation, until it is in the heat ray range.

    Firemen have sprayed down hot plastics and hot epoxy, and created massive amounts of steam. That could in no way be created by the chemical reactions present. Yet there is the super steam cloud. Often it was just going to be a slightly thicker then the usual pour. Or someone added just a bit more hardener to the vat, and it solidified before they got it out.

    The thickness of a hot part can create new effects never seen before. Its thickness can add another variable to the problem of cooling.

    Aluminum is known to give off heat very well. What if while quenching in cold water, the cooled aluminum can no longer dissipate heat at the same high rate? In other words cold aluminum is not as good a heat sink as warm aluminum. Internally I am saying that cold aluminum can only transfer so many units of heat per second. While hot or warm aluminum can transfer much more heat. So that the heat actually in the case of aluminum runs to the warm end.

    Heat and electricity are just different velocity electrons. You can create diodes that work with heat.

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