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Thread: Are Siemen Ohms International Ohms?

  1. #1 Are Siemen Ohms International Ohms? 
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    I found that there are three types of ohms or were. I am curious if the difference was just an apparatus differential or was there some other story to it.

    There are B.A. Ohms, or British Association of Advanced Science. The B.A. ohm is equal to 0.98651 International ohms.

    I.S. Ohms, or International Standard Ohms are equal to 1.01367 B.A. ohms.

    (Edited)Siemens ohms are equal to 0.94080 international ohms.



    Here are two links about it.


    http://www.sizes.com/units/ohm.htm

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siemen

    It seems to have flip flopped around a bit. I have other information as well.
    Today some equipment measures in Siemen ohms and some equipment is in International ohms.

    Here is a meter that is calibrated in Siemens.

    http://www.trifield.com/HighResistance.htm

    Sincerely,


    William McCormick


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  3. #2 Re: Are Siemen Ohms International Ohms? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    I found that there are three types of ohms or were. I am curious if the difference was just an apparatus differential or was there some other story to it.

    There are B.A. Ohms, or British Association of Advanced Science. The B.A. ohm is equal to 0.98651 International ohms.

    I.S. Ohms, or International Standard Ohms are equal to 1.01367 B.A. ohms.

    Siemens ohms are equal to 0.98651 international ohms.



    Here are two links about it.


    http://www.sizes.com/units/ohm.htm

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siemen

    It seems to have flip flopped around a bit. I have other information as well.
    Today some equipment measures in Siemen ohms and some equipment is in International ohms.

    Here is a meter that is calibrated in Siemens.

    http://www.trifield.com/HighResistance.htm

    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
    As usual, you are confused. As you have defined it above, the "Siemens ohm" is the same as the BA ohm, 0.98651 international ohms. That makes two types of ohms, not three. What makes you think the instrument advertised at trifield.com is calibrated in the obsolete units?


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  4. #3  
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    The siemen is not a variety of ohm; it is not even a measurement of electrical resistance.

    It is a unit of conductance, which is the reciprocal of resistance. The previous name for the unit of conductance was the mho.

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  5. #4 Re: Are Siemen Ohms International Ohms? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370
    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    I found that there are three types of ohms or were. I am curious if the difference was just an apparatus differential or was there some other story to it.

    There are B.A. Ohms, or British Association of Advanced Science. The B.A. ohm is equal to 0.98651 International ohms.

    I.S. Ohms, or International Standard Ohms are equal to 1.01367 B.A. ohms.

    Siemens ohms are equal to 0.98651 international ohms.



    Here are two links about it.


    http://www.sizes.com/units/ohm.htm

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siemen

    It seems to have flip flopped around a bit. I have other information as well.
    Today some equipment measures in Siemen ohms and some equipment is in International ohms.

    Here is a meter that is calibrated in Siemens.

    http://www.trifield.com/HighResistance.htm

    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
    As usual, you are confused. As you have defined it above, the "Siemens ohm" is the same as the BA ohm, 0.98651 international ohms. That makes two types of ohms, not three. What makes you think the instrument advertised at trifield.com is calibrated in the obsolete units?
    I think I mis-typed the values. Because I was trying to include extra information. The correct information is below in the jpeg and in the pdf.

    It may seem or be like that now. But for others it was something else.

    This is all the pages before and after, the jpeg page below.
    http://www.Rockwelder.com/Electricity/Units/Units.pdf

    I just wondered what the difference was. Or was it that they used a standard like I had read. By measuring a telegraph wires actual resistance/conductance over ten miles?

    Or was it instrumental, or was it mathematical in that the Seiman's ohm works out to one ohm, one volt, one amp and one watt? And my next point would be does it?




    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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  6. #5  
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    Jane did you happen to see the use of the fractal exponent? An exponent of 1/2 creates a square root.

    I wonder what the algorithm for exponents is, when you input a fractal value. In other words what does the exponent 1/2 mean. And more important can you use it in anyway to create a simplified method on paper to come up with square roots?


    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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  7. #6  
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    You mean fractional.
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  8. #7 Re: Are Siemen Ohms International Ohms? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    I think I mis-typed the values. Because I was trying to include extra information. The correct information is below in the jpeg and in the pdf.

    It may seem or be like that now. But for others it was something else.

    This is all the pages before and after, the jpeg page below.
    http://www.Rockwelder.com/Electricity/Units/Units.pdf

    I just wondered what the difference was. Or was it that they used a standard like I had read. By measuring a telegraph wires actual resistance/conductance over ten miles?

    Or was it instrumental, or was it mathematical in that the Seiman's ohm works out to one ohm, one volt, one amp and one watt? And my next point would be does it?
    What I got out of the article at sizes.com was that the various definitions of ohm were supposed to be based on cgs units, and so is the ohm we use today. However they also defined it in terms of the resistance of a column of mercury and their determination was not as accurate as today's standard. The so-called "international" or "reproducible" unit was in use for a while but was discontinued in 1948.

    I think in all cases, one ohm worked out to one volt one amp. It's just that if they were using the wrong ohm value, they got the voltage wrong too. That problem was discussed in the 1892 Sprague article quoted.
    The result is that at this moment no human being knows what a "volt" is, though electricians talk about it solemnly enough, and we hear of true volts, legal volts, the B A volt and Rayleigh's volt: while theorists will work them out to several places of decimals, it is the simple fact that the values of the units are so uncertain that they may involve an error of quite 2 per cent in the calculations.
    All this might be of historical interest but there is no reason to worry about it today, unless you are working with some antique telegraph equipment or something. It's really no different than any other units of measure. They have all changed over the years. A yard used to be the distance from the kings nose to the end of his thumb.
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by serpicojr
    You mean fractional.

    I guess you could hold me to that technically. But I just meant not a whole. A piece of an exponent.



    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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  10. #9 Re: Are Siemen Ohms International Ohms? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370
    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    I think I mis-typed the values. Because I was trying to include extra information. The correct information is below in the jpeg and in the pdf.

    It may seem or be like that now. But for others it was something else.

    This is all the pages before and after, the jpeg page below.
    http://www.Rockwelder.com/Electricity/Units/Units.pdf

    I just wondered what the difference was. Or was it that they used a standard like I had read. By measuring a telegraph wires actual resistance/conductance over ten miles?

    Or was it instrumental, or was it mathematical in that the Seiman's ohm works out to one ohm, one volt, one amp and one watt? And my next point would be does it?
    What I got out of the article at sizes.com was that the various definitions of ohm were supposed to be based on cgs units, and so is the ohm we use today. However they also defined it in terms of the resistance of a column of mercury and their determination was not as accurate as today's standard. The so-called "international" or "reproducible" unit was in use for a while but was discontinued in 1948.

    I think in all cases, one ohm worked out to one volt one amp. It's just that if they were using the wrong ohm value, they got the voltage wrong too. That problem was discussed in the 1892 Sprague article quoted.
    The result is that at this moment no human being knows what a "volt" is, though electricians talk about it solemnly enough, and we hear of true volts, legal volts, the B A volt and Rayleigh's volt: while theorists will work them out to several places of decimals, it is the simple fact that the values of the units are so uncertain that they may involve an error of quite 2 per cent in the calculations.
    All this might be of historical interest but there is no reason to worry about it today, unless you are working with some antique telegraph equipment or something. It's really no different than any other units of measure. They have all changed over the years. A yard used to be the distance from the kings nose to the end of his thumb.
    Thanks for taking the time to look into it.

    I just never liked the way they claimed to measure or set volts. Now if volts are based on ohms. And they are to some extent, I just want to know if any of this plays into some of the wild conventions in electric meters today.

    Like the block of platinum in England somewhere. We know its there, we can make our own if we know the measurement, and test it.

    But what is it that determines voltage, today, for an electric meter to pass as such. Or is it just that some Engineer with a degree put his stamp of approval on it?

    Because I see that in the building industry.

    I am going to ask around and find out.

    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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  11. #10 Re: Are Siemen Ohms International Ohms? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    I just never liked the way they claimed to measure or set volts. Now if volts are based on ohms. And they are to some extent, I just want to know if any of this plays into some of the wild conventions in electric meters today.

    Like the block of platinum in England somewhere. We know its there, we can make our own if we know the measurement, and test it.

    But what is it that determines voltage, today, for an electric meter to pass as such. Or is it just that some Engineer with a degree put his stamp of approval on it?
    This article explains the definition of a volt. Apparently the international standard now uses the Josephson junction.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volts
    http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...133/ai_6623213
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  12. #11 Re: Are Siemen Ohms International Ohms? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370
    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    I just never liked the way they claimed to measure or set volts. Now if volts are based on ohms. And they are to some extent, I just want to know if any of this plays into some of the wild conventions in electric meters today.

    Like the block of platinum in England somewhere. We know its there, we can make our own if we know the measurement, and test it.

    But what is it that determines voltage, today, for an electric meter to pass as such. Or is it just that some Engineer with a degree put his stamp of approval on it?
    This article explains the definition of a volt. Apparently the international standard now uses the Josephson junction.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volts
    http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...133/ai_6623213
    I think I will go down in the basement and whip one up. Ha-ha.

    Wow, somehow I think we could have found a better way, with less variables.


    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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