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Thread: IR in a camera shows white light .. ?

  1. #1 IR in a camera shows white light .. ? 
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    If you aim a camera (or camera-enhanced mobile phone) at a Infrared light source (e.g. a remote control device) the screen shows a white light.

    Why is this light white

    I asked a few people (like my physics teacher, and a camera salesman) but until now no-one was certain about why.
    If you know, please tell me.


    “The wireless telegraph is not difficult to understand. The ordinary telegraph is like a very long cat. You pull the tail in New York, and it meows in Los Angeles. The wireless is the same, only without the cat.” - Albert Einstein
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  3. #2 Re: IR in a camera shows white light .. ? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Psamathos
    If you aim a camera (or camera-enhanced mobile phone) at a Infrared light source (e.g. a remote control device) the screen shows a white light.

    Why is this light white

    I asked a few people (like my physics teacher, and a camera salesman) but until now no-one was certain about why.
    If you know, please tell me.
    Those cameras use infrared blockers.


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  4. #3 Re: IR in a camera shows white light .. ? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by (Q)
    Quote Originally Posted by Psamathos
    If you aim a camera (or camera-enhanced mobile phone) at a Infrared light source (e.g. a remote control device) the screen shows a white light.

    Why is this light white

    I asked a few people (like my physics teacher, and a camera salesman) but until now no-one was certain about why.
    If you know, please tell me.
    Those cameras use infrared blockers.

    Probably accelerators. Because you cannot block it, unless you create enough to repel it.

    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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    so you mean that the light is white because the camera can't block it with regular color filters? like white light does.. And in doing so the camera would "sense" it as white. I think I understand now
    “The wireless telegraph is not difficult to understand. The ordinary telegraph is like a very long cat. You pull the tail in New York, and it meows in Los Angeles. The wireless is the same, only without the cat.” - Albert Einstein
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Psamathos
    so you mean that the light is white because the camera can't block it with regular color filters? like white light does.. And in doing so the camera would "sense" it as white. I think I understand now
    Here's a modification to a webcam, for example:

    http://www.astro.ku.dk/~norup/webcam/faintlight.html
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    Quote Originally Posted by Psamathos
    so you mean that the light is white because the camera can't block it with regular color filters? like white light does.. And in doing so the camera would "sense" it as white. I think I understand now
    I am saying that filters that knock out reds accelerate, rays/electrons as I was taught, to a faster less noticeable condition.

    You only get a little yellow light from red light. And you get an even smaller amount of green light from red light. And you just get a glint of blue from accelerated red light.

    This acceleration of red can often have the effect of creating to much UV band or purple light when you overload the lens, with bright white light. I noticed this in the cannon lens.

    If you used a filter that slowed, you would get reds maybe yellows from greens and blues.

    One problem today is that often a company manufacturing a product will hide what they did by putting the opposite color noticeably, out where everyone can see it. It is often for safety reasons. To block UV created by the lenses.

    Check out this video. I did this a few years ago, it is not that good however you might notice a lens like effect taking place. They used to call welding glass, a welding a lense. Because they create the effect of the source being far off.

    http://www.Rockwelder.com/Electricit...eldingmask.WMV

    The camera is pretty stationary, the laser changing angle makes it appear the camera is moving. It gives that way off effect. The welding lens is pretty flat.


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    William McCormick
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    Quote Originally Posted by Psamathos
    so you mean that the light is white because the camera can't block it with regular color filters? like white light does.. And in doing so the camera would "sense" it as white. I think I understand now
    I am saying that filters that knock out reds accelerate, rays/electrons as I was taught, to a faster less noticeable condition.

    You only get a little yellow light from red light. And you get an even smaller amount of green light from red light. And you just get a glint of blue from accelerated red light.

    This acceleration of red can often have the effect of creating to much UV band or purple light when you overload the lens, with bright white light. I noticed this in the cannon lens.

    If you used a filter that slowed, you would get reds maybe yellows from greens and blues.

    One problem today is that often a company manufacturing a product will hide what they did by putting the opposite color noticeably, out where everyone can see it. It is often for safety reasons. To block UV created by the lenses.

    Check out this video. I did this a few years ago, it is not that good however you might notice a lens like effect taking place. They used to call welding glass, a welding a lense. Because they create the effect of the source being far off.

    http://www.Rockwelder.com/Electricit...eldingmask.WMV

    The camera is pretty stationary, the laser changing angle makes it appear the camera is moving. It gives that way off effect. The welding lens is pretty flat.


    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
    Billy, take your fantasies elsewhere.
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by (Q)
    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    Quote Originally Posted by Psamathos
    so you mean that the light is white because the camera can't block it with regular color filters? like white light does.. And in doing so the camera would "sense" it as white. I think I understand now
    I am saying that filters that knock out reds accelerate, rays/electrons as I was taught, to a faster less noticeable condition.

    You only get a little yellow light from red light. And you get an even smaller amount of green light from red light. And you just get a glint of blue from accelerated red light.

    This acceleration of red can often have the effect of creating to much UV band or purple light when you overload the lens, with bright white light. I noticed this in the cannon lens.

    If you used a filter that slowed, you would get reds maybe yellows from greens and blues.

    One problem today is that often a company manufacturing a product will hide what they did by putting the opposite color noticeably, out where everyone can see it. It is often for safety reasons. To block UV created by the lenses.

    Check out this video. I did this a few years ago, it is not that good however you might notice a lens like effect taking place. They used to call welding glass, a welding a lense. Because they create the effect of the source being far off.

    http://www.Rockwelder.com/Electricit...eldingmask.WMV

    The camera is pretty stationary, the laser changing angle makes it appear the camera is moving. It gives that way off effect. The welding lens is pretty flat.


    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
    Billy, take your fantasies elsewhere.
    Lets see some of your experiments that show mine up. Or state some real demonstrative evidence that combats mine. Some evidence that you are proud of and understand yourself.

    To see that laser though a welding lens is outrageous. You can note the color is almost a orange yellow. That is because the green lens accelerates the red laser to a more harmless light.

    The refraction is also wild. It makes it look like the laser is a Universe away to the human eye, at certain angles.
    The camera does not have nearly the spectrum the human eye has. The camera can only capture a certain range of light and dark.

    That is why you should do these experiments for yourself.

    The welding lens in that movie is only about 5/32" thick. Just over an eighth inch thick. Yet it looks to be much thicker, when viewing the laser through it.

    It is all velocity.

    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    Lets see some of your experiments that show mine up. Or state some real demonstrative evidence that combats mine. Some evidence that you are proud of and understand yourself.

    To see that laser though a welding lens is outrageous. You can note the color is almost a orange yellow. That is because the green lens accelerates the red laser to a more harmless light.

    The refraction is also wild. It makes it look like the laser is a Universe away to the human eye, at certain angles.
    The camera does not have nearly the spectrum the human eye has. The camera can only capture a certain range of light and dark.

    That is why you should do these experiments for yourself.

    The welding lens in that movie is only about 5/32" thick. Just over an eighth inch thick. Yet it looks to be much thicker, when viewing the laser through it.

    It is all velocity.

    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
    Do you have any evidence for yours?
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  11. #10  
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    I don't what you've been discussing in the last posts but if I continue to the main issue it's no hander than this:
    Since the infrared light passes all filters, it stimulates both cells that detect green, red and blue light at with approxiamately equal intensity why the camera detects it as white.
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  12. #11  
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    thank you! now you meddlers can keep chattering about welding lenses and accelerators. I don't really care, because I don't really understand.
    the movie looked kind of cool, although I couldn't really notice what I was looking at. A green laser through a lens?
    anyway my question has been answered, now I will astonish my physics teacher with my knowledge
    oh yeah
    “The wireless telegraph is not difficult to understand. The ordinary telegraph is like a very long cat. You pull the tail in New York, and it meows in Los Angeles. The wireless is the same, only without the cat.” - Albert Einstein
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  13. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by thyristor
    I don't what you've been discussing in the last posts but if I continue to the main issue it's no hander than this:
    Since the infrared light passes all filters, it stimulates both cells that detect green, red and blue light at with approxiamately equal intensity why the camera detects it as white.

    Ah, but you left out it does not stimulate the eye. And why is that?

    Because the eye is not over compensating to capture normal light. A camera is only capable of seeing a certain span of the whole, that a human is capable of.

    A camera starts to blend, darkness that is visible to a human welder, through a bright arc, into a bright arc. So that a camera cannot see through the bright arc. Like a human can. It just never catches the right image. You can compensate by adding tremendous amounts of light from both sides of the shot. To compensate for that. However it will never be what the human eye can detect.

    The fact that you see light in the camera tells us that the camera is in fact accelerating the inferred to light.

    The human eye can also see, rays that are faster then light. It adds to the whole picture. Some cameras are amazing they use a similar technique. However you can get those strange purple effects, upon overloading the lens with light.

    I should add that most cameras have two problems. Getting enough light, and then not causing to much white out. Or areas that are too bright, because of the extra unneeded light caused by reading other spectrums.

    So the first process of getting in the faster ultra violet to use as light slows down to much light. Causes to much light. So they try to knock out the excessive light and sometimes red eye, by accelerating it once again. This is what causes the inferred to be seen.




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    William McCormick
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  14. #13  
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    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    Quote Originally Posted by thyristor
    I don't what you've been discussing in the last posts but if I continue to the main issue it's no hander than this:
    Since the infrared light passes all filters, it stimulates both cells that detect green, red and blue light at with approxiamately equal intensity why the camera detects it as white.

    Ah, but you left out it does not stimulate the eye. And why is that?


    blabla




    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
    to be honest, I think this is a biological question and should be placed under biology. my teacher now understands, and that is quite an exeptional achievement. furthermore, I didn't ask how the human eye works. who cares, at least it does what it has to do.
    “The wireless telegraph is not difficult to understand. The ordinary telegraph is like a very long cat. You pull the tail in New York, and it meows in Los Angeles. The wireless is the same, only without the cat.” - Albert Einstein
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