Notices
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: binding energy

  1. #1 binding energy 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    77
    Can anybody explain to me why the nucleus weights less because of binding energy?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    bored in my house dur
    Posts
    5
    this is the definition i get if thats any help

    Code:
    has definition The energy required to break up a system. In particular, the binding energy of an atomic nucleus is the energy released in the formation of the nucleus. The most strongly bound nuclei are those with atomic weights between about 50 and 65 (the iron group). Lighter nuclei are less strongly bound because of their larger surface-to-volume ratios; heavier nuclei, because the effects of Coulomb repulsion increase with the nuclear charge.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    77
    I understand what binding energy is. I do not understand why the nucleus weights less because of binding energy.But thank you anyway.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,838
    A nucleus should actually have a greater mass due to binding energy due to the whole E=mc<sup>2</sup> thing. The mass of a nucleus will be greater than the total combined mass of its nucleons, due to the presence of binding energy.
    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    77
    Chemboy that is exactly what I thought, but here is a direct quote from my physics book. Am I interpreting this wrong? Or does it say the opposite of what it should?

    "One way to interpret this mass change is to say that a nucleon inside a nucleus has less mass than its rest mass outside the nucleus. How much less depends on which nucleus. The mass difference is related to "binding energy" of the nucleus."
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    77
    Well I talked to my teacher yesterday, and he said he thinks it is because as you take a part a nucleus, if you could, the binding energy would then be converted to mass and the nucleons would then weight more outside of the nucleus then they did inside the nucleus.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Professor sunshinewarrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,525
    Quote Originally Posted by EV33
    Well I talked to my teacher yesterday, and he said he thinks it is because as you take a part a nucleus, if you could, the binding energy would then be converted to mass and the nucleons would then weight more outside of the nucleus then they did inside the nucleus.
    Zigackly. Think of it as the energy required to free the nucleon from the nucleus. This energy is represented in the nucleon in the form of mass.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •