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Thread: Poking through the fabric of Space

  1. #1 Poking through the fabric of Space 
    Forum Masters Degree SuperNatendo's Avatar
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    Has anything ever been shown to remotely be close to able to accomplish such a feat? To actually poke a hole through space? We know space can be bent, it could possibly be twisted by massive, quickly rotating objects, but has anything been shown to even be remotely possible to poke a hole through it? Is that what happens when a black hole is formed?

    There is alot of junk science floating around about 'wormholes', 'whiteholes' and other such objects, but I want to know what kind of observations have been made in the real world or theories postulated about the probability of something being able to poke a hole in space AKA the universe.

    From what i understand about wormholes is that they do not poke a hole in space, rather, space is being twisted and curved to form a 'tunnel' to another part of space that had been curved back onto itself.

    To me all of this would require an immense amount of energy to pull off temporarily and, for a more permanent wormhole, you would have to strategically place extremely fast rotating dense masses in space to continuously sustain such an object.


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    Interesting, got me beat for the most part.I have always been accustomed to the idea that large amounts of mass can bend space/time creating the effect we know as gravity.But then again for gravity to occur, at least 2 objects must be present.And this makes me wonder, if our sun sat by itself in space with no other objects around for millions of light years, would space still be bent? I don't see why it wouldn't, but it's something to ponder.As far as poking a hole in space, I don't think it would be possible, I think that whatever object that is trying to poke a hole in space will just bend it until it either has the effect of a black hole or until the opposite side of the space being bent connect and a wormhole is formed, or some crazy thing similar to that effect. :wink:


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  4. #3 Re: Poking through the fabric of Space 
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperNatendo
    Has anything ever been shown to remotely be close to able to accomplish such a feat? To actually poke a hole through space? We know space can be bent, it could possibly be twisted by massive, quickly rotating objects, but has anything been shown to even be remotely possible to poke a hole through it? Is that what happens when a black hole is formed?
    Physicists are of different opinions on this topic. Some think Einstein's Field Equations adequately describe the state of things inside the Schwartzschild radius and others suspect that this physics may break down at that point. In any case it is rather clearly that even if Einstein's Field equations are applicable there is a rather severe breakdown in the meaning of time and space at this point, such that past this point all directions point inward towards the singularity - or the space inside this radius must be thought of as traveling towards the singularity at a speed greater than that of light. Both ideas are a considerable distortion of the usual ideas of physics and that is why I tend to think of this as an unraveling of the physics of space time -- in other words I do think of this as an example of a hole punched in the "fabric" of space-time.


    Quote Originally Posted by SuperNatendo
    There is alot of junk science floating around about 'wormholes', 'whiteholes' and other such objects, but I want to know what kind of observations have been made in the real world or theories postulated about the probability of something being able to poke a hole in space AKA the universe.
    Absolutely NONE whatsoever. Wormholes and whiteholes are pure science fiction. The fact that wormholes can be described by the mathematics of GR means nothing, for GR is a rather flexible theoretical framework much like Quantum Field theory, which can also describe things that do not exist like tachyons. Physicists do not believe that such things as tachyons actually exist, for physicists routinely reject theories that predict tachyons as incorrect theories. As for wormholes, there is not the slightest bit of scientific evidence that such things exist or that they can exist.
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  5. #4  
    Forum Masters Degree SuperNatendo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Always_growing
    Interesting, got me beat for the most part.I have always been accustomed to the idea that large amounts of mass can bend space/time creating the effect we know as gravity.But then again for gravity to occur, at least 2 objects must be present.And this makes me wonder, if our sun sat by itself in space with no other objects around for millions of light years, would space still be bent? I don't see why it wouldn't, but it's something to ponder.As far as poking a hole in space, I don't think it would be possible, I think that whatever object that is trying to poke a hole in space will just bend it until it either has the effect of a black hole or until the opposite side of the space being bent connect and a wormhole is formed, or some crazy thing similar to that effect. :wink:
    Too bad we cannot make a universe that only has one huge opbject and test if space is still bent without sending an object to measure it!!

    That would be a great way to finally prove wether or not gravity is an attraction of matter or simply the result of curved space!!!
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    A black hole is not a hole or a tear in space. The term hole is deceiving. It is simply a immensly dense particle or matter whos gravity sucks in everything including light. They have just been played on by science fiction movies and books.

    As for wormholes, I beleive they thereotically COULD exist, but there is little to no evidence.
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    Thank you yousseff, and everyone who contributed. That fits with what I have been researching.
    "It's no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense." - Mark Twain
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    instead of creating a universe with a single object


    could you not go out into space where there is no gravity around it from other objects and place a canister or spere typw buble and put a dense pice of metal or something and measure the effects of gravity out put on that object. or would the canister it is in act as anougher object.
    In life it is not the destination that matters,but the journey there.
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    I think the canister would have an effect. Even if ou made a ball of spacetime it would still factor, or would it? If you had a ball of spacetime the obejcts in it would morph to satify the spaces' shape.
    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
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  10. #9  
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    As I understand it, each particle bends space to some degree. The combined effect of all the particles in a star then cause the large distortion we experience. According to theory, gravity has an infinite reach. The effect does become small fairly quickly though, reducing by the square of the distance. But when gravity is ascribed to a particle, i.e. a graviton, the effect does not extend to infinite distance in practice.
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

    "Gullibility kills" - Carl Sagan
    "All people know the same truth. Our lives consist of how we chose to distort it." - Harry Block
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