Notices
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Speed of Light

  1. #1 Speed of Light 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    5
    I have a rather stupid idea of lightspeed but i just wanna shoot;

    Imagine a rod rotating around one of its ends. We can say that it may reach high velocities. Now place another rod at the end of the rod, rotating at a similar speed and continue on until considering microscobic engines at the tip of insanely rotating rods. Would it be possible to reach the speed of light by that method?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Bachelors Degree
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    NC USA
    Posts
    488
    *
    No. You would not even come close. The various centrifugal forces would tear apart your rods well before they come anywhere near relativistic speeds. This is one of limitations in the design of ultra high speed centrifuges.


    .


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    5
    OK then one other thing;

    Where do we reference while we measure the speed of light? Would the speed of Earth and Sun add up to the velocities that we achieve on the surface?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    (Q)
    (Q) is offline
    Forum Isotope (Q)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,650
    Quote Originally Posted by Apsis Consectetur
    OK then one other thing;

    Where do we reference while we measure the speed of light? Would the speed of Earth and Sun add up to the velocities that we achieve on the surface?
    One of the postulates of Special Relativity states that the speed of light is independent of the velocity of the observer.
    Religious Fundamentalist Club - Member #1.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    The Doctor Quantime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    4,546
    Quote Originally Posted by (Q)
    Quote Originally Posted by Apsis Consectetur
    OK then one other thing;

    Where do we reference while we measure the speed of light? Would the speed of Earth and Sun add up to the velocities that we achieve on the surface?
    One of the postulates of Special Relativity states that the speed of light is independent of the velocity of the observer.
    Is that gobblydegook for light speed is constant for all observors for all reference frames in space?
    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    (Q)
    (Q) is offline
    Forum Isotope (Q)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,650
    Quote Originally Posted by 425 Chaotic Requisition

    Is that gobblydegook for light speed is constant for all observors for all reference frames in space?
    Uh no, it's a postulate of SR. Just as I said it was.

    Yours is gobbledygook. Only in space? hehe
    Religious Fundamentalist Club - Member #1.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    The Doctor Quantime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    4,546
    The Principle of Relativity - The laws by which the states of physical systems undergo change are not affected, whether these changes of state be referred to the one or the other of two systems of inertial coordinates in uniform translatory motion.

    The Principle of Invariant Light Speed - Light in vacuum propagates with the speed c (a fixed constant) in terms of any system of inertial coordinates, regardless of the state of motion of the light source.

    I would not have out this had you not been so arrogant.

    Mine was a shortered version of the above, which made sense compared to yours I believe . We are telling a person about how SR affects his OP, you put words that even I did not understand, when you could have easily put more simple words that made it more simple for you, the OP and everyone else.

    The speed of light is 2.99792458x10^8m/sec/sec for any observor no matter their reference frame/motion. If one travels in space at 0.9c towards light, light is still 1c, and if they travel away from the light, still 1c.

    (Q), you just had to put in your arrogant self righetousness as usual didn't you? There is no need to 'impress' others or demean their intelligence by explaining something they wish to understand, in a way they will not understand at first glance to satisfy you want to dominate others, which is cleary visible in many of your posts.
    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    (Q)
    (Q) is offline
    Forum Isotope (Q)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,650
    Quote Originally Posted by 425 Chaotic Requisition

    (Q), you just had to put in your arrogant self righetousness as usual didn't you? There is no need to 'impress' others or demean their intelligence by explaining something they wish to understand, in a way they will not understand at first glance to satisfy you want to dominate others, which is cleary visible in many of your posts.
    Huh? WTF are you on about? Your explanation was clearly wrong, so how could it have made more sense?
    Religious Fundamentalist Club - Member #1.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •