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Thread: Some Laws only depend on other laws?

  1. #1 Some Laws only depend on other laws? 
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    SS recently talked about mathematics based on perseption.

    The wave pattern of light collapses in the double slit experiment due to observation.

    I am thinking of a way to word my hypothesis of why... What is the popular one again?

    mine might be a little far out...


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  3. #2  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    There is considerable debate as to what constitutes observation. For example, in the mind experiment with Schroedinger's cat I really don't see why the cat can't do its own observing. It should be perfectly capable of telling if is dead or not.


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    Forum Bachelors Degree Shaderwolf's Avatar
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    as with the airplane on a conveyor belt, Schroedinger's cat is a parodoxial situation that showed a flaw in quantum physics. In our problem, the conveyor belt is impossible, (though the rest of the problem has no problems) In quantum physics there is obviously something that breaks the rules of real world physics, otherwise there would be no Schroedinger's cat parodox.

    However... though this seems impossible, the notion of a cat that's dead and alive at the same time is much like the notion of the queer principle of light. we know that that principle is true.
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  5. #4  
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    There is considerable debate as to what constitutes observation. For example, in the mind experiment with Schroedinger's cat I really don't see why the cat can't do its own observing. It should be perfectly capable of telling if is dead or not.
    You've entirely missed the point of the thought experiment, the cat isn't important. The HUMAN observation is. The human doesnt know whether the cat is alive or dead. If the poison has had a finite probability of killing it, say 50% after a second, then after a second has passed the human can only know that the cat has a 50% chance of being alive and a 50% chance of being dead, he cannot say which one for definite. This is how QM works; it describes a state as a function of probabilities and until an observation is made about the state (in our example the bloke opens the box), it is still just probabilities of different states (50% alive, 50% dead). However when the observation is made, the state is known, therefore all of the other probabilities for the other states are 0% (0% Alive, 100% dead) .

    Another example is the electron cloud around an atom. The cloud isn't a position of the electron. It is just the collection of the different probabilities of the electron being in a place. (1% position 1, 1% position 2 ... etc) This makes up a cloud of different positions. However as soon as a measurement is made on where the electron is (all sorts of techniques), only one of the positions can be true (because you measured it there!) so all of the other probabilities turn to 0%. UNTIL you make this measurement though, QM describes the electrons as being able to be anywhere in the cloud.

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  6. #5  
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    [quote="Cynapse"]
    . This is how QM works; it describes a state as a function of probabilities and until an observation is made about the state (in our example the bloke opens the box), it is still just probabilities of different states (50% alive, 50% dead). However when the observation is made, the state is known, therefore all of the other probabilities for the other states are 0% (0% Alive, 100% dead) .

    I understood QM in a flash
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  7. #6  
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    [quote="Cynapse"][quote]. This is how QM works; it describes a state as a function of probabilities and until an observation is made about the state (in our example the bloke opens the box), it is still just probabilities of different states (50% alive, 50% dead). However when the observation is made, the state is known, therefore all of the other probabilities for the other states are 0% (0% Alive, 100% dead) .

    I understood QM in a flash
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