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Thread: The power from the moon

  1. #1 The power from the moon 
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    The moon annually receives 13,000 TW(OMG!!!Imagine the amount!!!) from the sun. And if likely we could convert even 1% of it for our use then why would we need any fossil fuel plants on earth.

    Now coming back to LSP, the way it works is very simple. We have to identify sites on the moon as power bases. There solar energy would be converted into electrical and then converted to the microwave which would be beamed towards the earth. On earth placing the rectennas(rectified antennas) would do the job. They would capture the microwave beam and then distribute in the region around themselves.

    for more details http://science-n-tech.blogspot.com/2...lunar-now.html


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  3. #2  
    Time Lord
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    A big power issue (the one I thought you would be referring to in this thread) to do with the Moon is that scientists currently believe its surface is covered in a substance known as Helium 3, which is extremely rare on Earth. (Found only in decomissioned nuclear weapons)

    It's useful in fusion. It's easier to fuse than Hydrogen, to the point where using it apparently even makes fusion practical as a form of energy generation. So, if we could start bringing back large quantities of Helium 3 from the moon, we'd have a new way to get energy.


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  4. #3  
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    i dont think the moon has He-3.......it has only traces of He-4(very small amts)
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  5. #4  
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    I'm getting this off of a documentary I watched on some channel like Discovery a week or two back, so I'm not sure how much credibility to give it. Apparently this guy found a fairly high quantity of it in some of the Moon rocks brought back from the Apollo missions. I mean, not like 5% or anything really substantial, but a lot more than you'd find on Earth. (since you don't ever find it naturally occurring on Earth).


    The theory is that it comes from the solar wind being able to hit the Moon's surface for so many billions of years without an atmosphere to impede it. They also showed that there's a way to get water out of Moon rocks too, though I'm not sure if I'd want to drink it.
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by kojax
    A big power issue (the one I thought you would be referring to in this thread) to do with the Moon is that scientists currently believe its surface is covered in a substance known as Helium 3, which is extremely rare on Earth. (Found only in decomissioned nuclear weapons)

    It's useful in fusion. It's easier to fuse than Hydrogen, to the point where using it apparently even makes fusion practical as a form of energy generation. So, if we could start bringing back large quantities of Helium 3 from the moon, we'd have a new way to get energy.
    Right, and if we could use fusion engines to get there it would be a great idea. Moon and back in hours.
    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
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  7. #6  
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    maybe u r right.........i am myself quite unsure.......


    but He-3 is a light gas n i wonder how can it stay in moon's atmosphere without escaping......
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  8. #7  
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    Yes that all sounds very good and easy but please tell me how you plan to get all your solar panels to the moon...?

    Barry
    Thinking of the question is greater than knowing the answer...
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  9. #8 Re: The power from the moon 
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    Quote Originally Posted by indian_kartoon
    The moon annually receives 13,000 TW(OMG!!!Imagine the amount!!!) from the sun. And if likely we could convert even 1% of it for our use then why would we need any fossil fuel plants on earth.

    Now coming back to LSP, the way it works is very simple. We have to identify sites on the moon as power bases. There solar energy would be converted into electrical and then converted to the microwave which would be beamed towards the earth. On earth placing the rectennas(rectified antennas) would do the job. They would capture the microwave beam and then distribute in the region around themselves.

    for more details http://science-n-tech.blogspot.com/2...lunar-now.html


    The are are a number of problems with this scheme.

    Even a laser will diverge to 3km across by the time it crosses the distance between the Moon and Earth, and since divergence is proportional to wavelength and microwaves have much greater wavelengths than visible light, you could expect much larger divergences for a maser.

    Assuming that you solve the divergence problem, you have to take into account the movement of the Moon. The Moon does not maintain the same position over the same spot of the Earth, the Earth rotates under it. Thus your maser beam would have to track receiving stations as the Earth rotated and switch to newe receiving stations as stations pass behind the Horizon.

    The Moon does not keep one face exactly facing the Earth. Due to its elliptical orbit and the fact that it's axis of rotation is slightly tilted in respect to its orbital plane, the moon nods up and down and swings side to side as seen from the Earth, your Masers woud have to track and make up for these motions also.

    The Earth-moon distance magnifies this tracking problem. At that distance, an aiming error of just a fraction of a percent of a degree will result in a error of hundreds of kilometers by the time the beam reaches Earth. A moonquake would be enough to cause the beam to dance all over the place by the time it reached Earth.

    You can't even use a feedback mechanism between MASER and recieving station to keep the MASER tracked. It takes 1.25 sec for light to traverse the distance between the Earth and Moon. This means that by the time the receiving station notes that the beam has started to drift, the MASER at the moon end has been drifting hor 1.25 sec, and by the time this info bets back to the MASER, it will have been drifting for 2.5 sec.
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