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Thread: Can a rock 'hear'?

  1. #1 Can a rock 'hear'? 
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    Please note 'hear' is in inverted comma's.

    What happens to the atoms of rocks when they are exposed to high frequency 'sounds'? Anything, nothing?

    Silly question as I suppose a really high pitch could shatter one, so the rock is subject to sound waves.

    Can anyone elaborate?


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    You're the know it all you tell us :P.

    Kidding. Yes it is possible, although I do not know the exact frequency but everything has a frequency that it can be pierced. There would have to be a lot and the waves have high energy. VERY high energy-this isn't glass. Although it is similar. The sound would be something we cannot hear anyway.


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    Administrator KALSTER's Avatar
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    Any sound would travel through rock, some maybe escaping, while others would be converted into heat energy. If the resonance frequency is produced, the rock would start to vibrate more and more violently as the intensity goes up until the crystal lattice energy is not enough to keep it from cracking. As to how resonance frequency works, maybe it is the frequency where additive interference happens, causing a higher amplitude and so, more intense vibration. Maybe? :?
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    Quote Originally Posted by svwillmer
    You're the know it all you tell us :P.

    Kidding. Yes it is possible, although I do not know the exact frequency but everything has a frequency that it can be pierced. There would have to be a lot and the waves have high energy. VERY high energy-this isn't glass. Although it is similar. The sound would be something we cannot hear anyway.

    how would you create an intensley high pitched sound? Could you manipulate the waves somehow?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Theoryofrelativity
    Quote Originally Posted by svwillmer
    You're the know it all you tell us :P.

    Kidding. Yes it is possible, although I do not know the exact frequency but everything has a frequency that it can be pierced. There would have to be a lot and the waves have high energy. VERY high energy-this isn't glass. Although it is similar. The sound would be something we cannot hear anyway.

    how would you create an intensley high pitched sound? Could you manipulate the waves somehow?
    Well perhaps if you got an oscillating frequency and reinforced the cause of that frequency with more of the sound as in give more of the sound out faster, eventually it would crack, but I would'nt say it could be split in half, the waves would have to be so concentrated and act over a few angstroms, very difficult to do. A laser would be better .

    Blow on a dog whistle really hard :|, sorry but I don't know how to make a high frequency as I just don't know what the frequency of sound actually is.
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    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER
    Any sound would travel through rock, some maybe escaping, while others would be converted into heat energy. If the resonance frequency is produced, the rock would start to vibrate more and more violently as the intensity goes up until the crystal lattice energy is not enough to keep it from cracking. As to how resonance frequency works, maybe it is the frequency where additive interference happens, causing a higher amplitude and so, more intense vibration. Maybe? :?
    very interesting

    as for harnessing power of 'sound' I read about it this one time.

    could sound waves technically be used to 'move' something?
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    ok far out thought here bear with me

    If a moving object makes a sound and the exact sound waves produced were observed and recorded, in the absence of that moving object, could the 'sound waves' be reproduced next to a stationary object and thus move it?
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    A big enough bass driver would create some wind, but a fan would work better. :wink: I don't know of a situation where sound would work better than some other method :? You going somewhere with this?
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER
    A big enough bass driver would create some wind, but a fan would work better. :wink: I don't know of a situation where sound would work better than some other method :? You going somewhere with this?
    sound is vibration and vibration causes movent

    so a carefully directed vibration could create a movement

    I was merely trying to think of how to 'capture' a recording of a vibration sufficient to replicate the movement that produced it.
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    The Christmas tsunami made a prety impressive sound in all the planet's rock.
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  12. #11 Re: Can a rock 'hear'? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Theoryofrelativity
    Please note 'hear' is in inverted comma's.

    What happens to the atoms of rocks when they are exposed to high frequency 'sounds'? Anything, nothing?

    Silly question as I suppose a really high pitch could shatter one, so the rock is subject to sound waves.

    Can anyone elaborate?

    For the rock to "hear" it would need to be "self-aware", aware of something that affects it. So, in theory, you need two rocks, seemingly superimposed on one another, communicating with one another about what is being heard. Further to that, the way the rocks communicate with one another would need to be in a way that projects a type of internal message relevant to the sound being heard, presumably the same one we hear. Thus, to measure that experiment, you would need quite a developed rock, like the ones we carry on our heads, two rocks as one, as we also have two halves of a brain that communicates with itself (most of us) for us to be conscious.
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  13. #12 Re: Can a rock 'hear'? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by streamSystems
    Quote Originally Posted by Theoryofrelativity
    Please note 'hear' is in inverted comma's.

    What happens to the atoms of rocks when they are exposed to high frequency 'sounds'? Anything, nothing?

    Silly question as I suppose a really high pitch could shatter one, so the rock is subject to sound waves.

    Can anyone elaborate?

    For the rock to "hear" it would need to be "self-aware", .
    I didn't mean 'hear' in the biological hearing sense. Hence the inverted comma's.
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  14. #13  
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    Sorry, I wasn't being criticial, I was merely highlighting to the forum what would be required for a rock to actually "hear".
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    And the forum is very grateful.
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    As I am gracious in any perceived success or defeat.
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  17. #16  
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    Quote Originally Posted by streamSystems
    Sorry, I wasn't being criticial, I was merely highlighting to the forum what would be required for a rock to actually "hear".
    like I said, I did not mean 'hear' in the literal biological sense, but feel free to point out irrelevancies.
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  18. #17  
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    No problem.

    I hope someone provides you with the answer that makes sense to you.
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  19. #18  
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    Quote Originally Posted by streamSystems
    No problem.

    I hope someone provides you with the answer that makes sense to you.
    they have to the first part - both Kalster and SVW did. thanks.
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