Notices
Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: What does dark matter look like?

  1. #1 What does dark matter look like? 
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    120
    If I had a clump of dark matter in my hand, what would it look like? Would it be black or invisible?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Cardiff, Wales
    Posts
    5,810
    is it even the type of thing that you can hold in your hand ?


    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3 Re: What does dark matter look like? 
    Forum Junior Lucifer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Close to 290125001
    Posts
    223
    Quote Originally Posted by gib65
    If I had a clump of dark matter in my hand, what would it look like? Would it be black or invisible?
    It wouldn't be there in any way you could notice. Dark matter does not interact with electromagnetic force, which is the force that sticks our atoms together and prevents matter from occupying the space of other matter. So, it would pass through your hand and would drop into the center of the Earth, as gravity affects it and it haves a mass.

    But without the interactions of electromagnetic force, you couldn't see nor touch it...

    (Anyway I'm not sure of what effects could have from the other two forces, although we can't detect them with our senses. Notice there are four forces in the universe: gravity, electromagnetism, strong nuclear force and weak nuclear force).
    “If the misery of the poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin.” -Charles Darwin
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    120
    So is it reasonable to say that for every large object in the universe (planet, moon, star) there's probably a glob of dark matter buzzing around its center?... On that note, is it possible that we (our planet and local celestial environment) could be drifting towards astronomically huge masses of dark matter and not recognize what it was we were converging towards?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5 Dark matter 
    Forum Professor leohopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Dulwich, London, England
    Posts
    1,418
    Dark matter looks like this -------->
    The hand of time rested on the half-hour mark, and all along that old front line of the English there came a whistling and a crying. The men of the first wave climbed up the parapets, in tumult, darkness, and the presence of death, and having done with all pleasant things, advanced across No Man's Land to begin the Battle of the Somme. - Poet John Masefield.

    www.leohopkins.com
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6 Re: Dark matter 
    Forum Senior TvEye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    398
    Quote Originally Posted by leohopkins
    Dark matter looks like this -------->
    No, that's what the invisible man looks like.
    "First we build the tools, then they build us" - Marshall McLuhan.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7 Re: Dark matter 
    Forum Professor leohopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Dulwich, London, England
    Posts
    1,418
    Quote Originally Posted by TvEye
    Quote Originally Posted by leohopkins
    Dark matter looks like this -------->
    No, that's what the invisible man looks like.
    How do you know?

    Infact all dark matter is shaped EXACTLY like the invisible man!
    Prove me wrong!
    The hand of time rested on the half-hour mark, and all along that old front line of the English there came a whistling and a crying. The men of the first wave climbed up the parapets, in tumult, darkness, and the presence of death, and having done with all pleasant things, advanced across No Man's Land to begin the Battle of the Somme. - Poet John Masefield.

    www.leohopkins.com
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8 Re: Dark matter 
    Forum Senior TvEye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    398
    Quote Originally Posted by leohopkins
    Infact all dark matter is shaped EXACTLY like the invisible man!
    Prove me wrong!
    Damn it. This is what I hate about science. Always these gods, leprechauns and invisible men.

    I think I should just forget this whole thing and get into the pseudosciences, like mathematics.
    "First we build the tools, then they build us" - Marshall McLuhan.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9 Re: What does dark matter look like? 
    Suspended
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    a reality you have all yet to properly explain
    Posts
    902
    Quote Originally Posted by gib65
    If I had a clump of dark matter in my hand, what would it look like? Would it be black or invisible?

    Dark Matter is still science fiction: it is like a mythical Atlantis. Dark Matter is a concept that was proposed to accommodate for Big Bang theorist's model of the Universe, to accommodate for gravitational inconsistencies in the pattern of EM radiation in what is thought to be a faitrly uniform space-time universe. It is an idea. There is no absolute proof for it. It is a theoretical explanation for the behavior of light travelling through space at great distances. It is therefore a source of GREAT INTEREST to the scientific community, because it represents a potential GOLD MINE of new ideas that eager theoretical physicists are willing to cash in on (including their own autobiographies).
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    (Q)
    (Q) is offline
    Forum Isotope (Q)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,650
    Non-luminous gas. Simply put, gas that is either clear or transparent, proportional to it's emissivity, or it's ability to absorb or radiate energy.

    Huge globs of this type of gas could provide a gravitational field that might affect rotational speeds of galaxies or cause gravitational lensing and remain completely undetectable to electromagnetic radiation detectors .

    Seems reasonable.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11 Re: What does dark matter look like? 
    (Q)
    (Q) is offline
    Forum Isotope (Q)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,650
    Quote Originally Posted by streamSystems

    Dark Matter is still science fiction: it is like a mythical Atlantis ... it represents a potential GOLD MINE of new ideas that eager theoretical physicists are willing to cash in on (including their own autobiographies).
    Said the kettle to the pot. :wink:
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12 Re: What does dark matter look like? 
    The Doctor Quantime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    4,546
    Quote Originally Posted by (Q)
    Quote Originally Posted by streamSystems

    Dark Matter is still science fiction: it is like a mythical Atlantis ... it represents a potential GOLD MINE of new ideas that eager theoretical physicists are willing to cash in on (including their own autobiographies).
    Said the kettle to the pot. :wink:
    Pot to the kettle, other way around (Q) :wink:
    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    a reality you have all yet to properly explain
    Posts
    902
    I am glad you guys know what you are talking about. Still, in not trying to lose the plot completely, I would still confirm with myself (pot and kettle) that unless we are made up of dark matter ourselves, biologically, it belongs where all other fantasy materials belong.........with people who talk about kettles and pots in a science-forum.

    It would be kind of weird that we could propose to be conscious of something that is not intrinsic to our own biological make-up, right?

    Thank God though for the Star Wars series, for if it was not for the ideas promoted there, like midichlorines, THE FORCE (need I go on), that we would not know the difference between fantasy and reality.

    Still, I also believe that humans are excellent at adapting to new environments, and so presumably by the time we have the technology to go out and investigate dark-matter, we would have developed some type of alien-like dark-matter form into our biology.

    I look forward to those possibilities.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    (Q)
    (Q) is offline
    Forum Isotope (Q)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,650
    Quote Originally Posted by streamSystems
    Iunless we are made up of dark matter ourselves, biologically, it belongs where all other fantasy materials belong.
    Are you made of uranium 238?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    a reality you have all yet to properly explain
    Posts
    902
    I guess it would congeal well with my current atomic make-up.

    Doesn't our water supply have trace elements of almost everything though, in terms of atomic substance, except the real exotic stuff?

    But being made up of dark-matter, as I said, maybe we could adapt?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #16  
    (Q)
    (Q) is offline
    Forum Isotope (Q)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,650
    Quote Originally Posted by streamSystems

    But being made up of dark-matter, as I said, maybe we could adapt?
    Unknown, our bodies rely on EM interactions to survive.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  18. #17  
    Forum Bachelors Degree Shaderwolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    OPSEC, baby. Sorry.
    Posts
    425
    Stream Systems: Check Nasa, They've proved dark matter!
    The link's on another recent thread about dark matter.
    Here's the problem with questions like "what would we see if we traveled faster than the speed of light". Since the rules that govern the universe as we understand them do not allow for such a possibility, to imagine such an event forces us to abandon those rules. But that leaves us no guide by which to answer the question. We have no idea as to what rules to replace them with, and we can't give an answer. - Janus
    Reply With Quote  
     

  19. #18 Consider the nature of the point.... 
    Forum Freshman Rye Rye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    17
    If you wanted to mathematically understand dark matter, consider the point.
    It is actually a zero-dimensional body that exists as a mosaique in infinite spacial volume. Basucally, if you take light, and pass it through a singularity, youll be left with a point, with dimensions (X_0)^1/4, or the fourth root of X naught.

    This body is a zero-dimensional body that moves along the time line.

    On a cartesian plane, dark matter would be every infitesimal pt on the plane. The same applies in R3 and in R4. it intersects every pt in these spaces, but can only do so through R0.


    Visit http://www.lsst.org/Science/images/m...on0024_500.jpg
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •