Notices
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Advance of Mercury's perihelion

  1. #1 Advance of Mercury's perihelion 
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    31
    Advance of Mercury's perihelion


    According to the Newton's Mechanics, always:

    As it is known, the astronomic observations on the advance of the perihelion of planet Mercury produce a value of D = 574"./century.

    According to the study of L. Verierr (1835), the sum of the perturbative forces of all other planets (Venus, Earth, Mars,.. Pluto) on planet Mercury produce a value of D' = 531"./century.
    Thus, there is a difference of:

    δ = D - D' = 574''/century - 531''/century = 43''/century.

    L. Verierr, in his study, considered that the center of mass of the Sun and the center of mass of the Solar System coincide (namely they are in the same position).

    But this is wrong because these two mass canters do not coincide, see:

    http://astro.berkeley.edu/~eliot/Astro7A/Gravity.pdf

    Also, as it is known, the Sun and the planets rotate around the center of mass of our solar system and not around the center of mass of the Sun .

    Consequently, if, in our calculations, we take into account the Sun's and the planets' rotation around the center of mass of the Solar System and not around the center of mass of the Sun (as it has been happening until today) then we once again have the same difference:

    δ = D - D' = 574.''/century - 531''/century = 43''/century

    as it is claimed by L. Verierr in his study?


    This was my question.


    Also,As appears on:

    http://astro.berkeley.edu/~eliot/Astro7A/Gravity.pdf

    pict.3


    The average distance (radius) R of the Sun's rotation around the center of mass of the solar system is:

    R = 2.4 Rs

    Where Rs is the radius of the Sun.



    Consequently, the center of mass of the Solar system is located outside of the mass of the Sun!!!

    Following the above, I would like to ask from the physicists of this forum to let me know the relevant bibliography where it is mentioned whether, from the age of Le Verrier (1835) to nowadays (2007), it has been taken into consideration the rotation of the Sun around the center of mass of the solar system for the calculation of the perihelion advance δ = 43"/century of planet Mercury.



    Thanks,

    Christos A. Tsolkas


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    a reality you have all yet to properly explain
    Posts
    902
    Your request could in fact be more complicated than you have thought.

    As an introduction to my answer, the centre of gravity in regard to the space-precinct of Earth is somewhere between the Earth and the Moon, which is due of course to the Moon's rotation around the Earth. In fact, the Moon protects this planet from the general big asteroid strike, because asteroids gravitate eventually to an alignment somewhere between the Earth and the Moon.

    The thing about the rotation of the planets around the sun, the varying rotations, does not place the sun as the centre of gravity of the solar system.

    In fact the centre of gravity of the solar system could be a "ring" region as we perceive it "around" the sun, as the centre of gravity of the space precinct of Earth is "around" this planet in the plane of rotation of the moon.\\


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Bachelors Degree
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    NC USA
    Posts
    488
    I take issue with your statement as follows:

    Also, as it is known, the Sun and the planets rotate around the center of mass of our solar system and not around the center of mass of the Sun .
    I have never done the calculations but I feel quite certain that Mercury revolves about the center of mass of the Sun-Mercury system, not the center of mass of the entire solar system. Of course, the planet still feels the effects of perturbations from the other planets.

    I have never heard of L. Verrier nor of his 1835 study. Whatever your question happens to be (it is still unclear to me just what you are trying to find out) you need to contact a specialist in astrophysics. You are most unlikely to find any in a public forum. Try a direct contact to the professor of astrophysics at UC Berkeley who uses your pdf reference to teach his course.

    See: http://ls.berkeley.edu/?q=about-coll...ting-our-staff

    *
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    8,035
    Well, any gravitational force that pulls the sun out of its position, will also pull Mercury out of its position as well. I'm unclear as to whether the center of mass for the solar system is even measurably different from the center of mass of the sun.

    It's different, but is it measurably different?

    I guess the pertinent question is: Does the rest of the mass in the solar system ever move the sun?
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •