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Thread: does water make scissors sharper?

  1. #1 does water make scissors sharper? 
    Forum Ph.D.
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    well, i was wondering the other day, i was cutting something with my scissor. it was a bit dirty, and didn't cut very well, so i washed it.
    still wet, i started cutting, and it was all of a sudden like cutting butter.
    i'm just wondering if the water functioned like an oil, reducing friction by
    filling up microscopic crevices and such that could add to friction,
    as well as smoothing out the scissor edge?
    or if its solely because the smudge on it was causing fricton.


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  3. #2  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    That's a good question...I wonder if that's why the barber wets your hair before cutting it.


    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman Jellybird's Avatar
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    i dont know why hairdressers do that, but i thought it was because wet hair sticks togther, so it's less frizzy and easier to cut..
    As for the scissors, maybe they didnt cut before because of the dirt which obstructed the cutting edge?
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  5. #4 Re: does water make scissors sharper? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by dejawolf
    well, i was wondering the other day, i was cutting something with my scissor. it was a bit dirty, and didn't cut very well, so i washed it.
    still wet, i started cutting, and it was all of a sudden like cutting butter.
    i'm just wondering if the water functioned like an oil, reducing friction by
    filling up microscopic crevices and such that could add to friction,
    as well as smoothing out the scissor edge?
    or if its solely because the smudge on it was causing fricton.
    We cut all types of rocks in the lab with a variety of water and oil cooled blades. The liquid acts as a coolant to reduce heat build up. Even the blades of a pair of scissors can ever so slightly bend etc. when cutting any material. Coolant maintains the integrity of the blade shape and thus concentrates energy in the cutting edge.

    If you are ever in a bind to cut a hard material, use a spray bottle and keep wetting the blade. the edge of the blade may be ruined but you can het through most materials if the edge is steel. If temperature can be maintained then all that matters is that the cutting edge be up a harder material than the material being cut. Stone cutting blades are not 'sharp' but of hard steel, diamond tipped, etc.

    (I don't know if this why hairdressers wet hair.)
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  6. #5  
    M
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    i was cutting something with my scissor
    The key word here is "something". What was it?

    For hair cutters, cooling is not a big issue. Water helps to soften and straighten your hair, that's why it's easier to cut when wet. Certainly, paper whould also be softened when soaking up the excess moisture from your scissors.
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  7. #6 Re: does water make scissors sharper? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by dejawolf
    well, i was wondering the other day, i was cutting something with my scissor. it was a bit dirty, and didn't cut very well, so i washed it.
    still wet, i started cutting, and it was all of a sudden like cutting butter.
    i'm just wondering if the water functioned like an oil, reducing friction by
    filling up microscopic crevices and such that could add to friction,
    as well as smoothing out the scissor edge?
    or if its solely because the smudge on it was causing fricton.
    The short and accurate answer is one word: lubrication.
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