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Thread: Simple battery question

  1. #1 Simple battery question 
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    I'm not smart, I'm pretty dumb. But still I have a little question.
    Is it not possible to make batteries that recharge in an instant? Why can't they give four V for example and 'take' 220 so that it would be recharged in seconds.

    Why is this not possible?

    Thanks.


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  3. #2  
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    doice could u elaborate the question .i'm not able to understand it.


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  4. #3 Re: Simple battery question 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doice
    I'm not smart, I'm pretty dumb. But still I have a little question.
    Is it not possible to make batteries that recharge in an instant? Why can't they give four V for example and 'take' 220 so that it would be recharged in seconds.

    Why is this not possible?

    Thanks.
    There is a limit as how fast a battery can charge/discharge. To make a battery that could be charged in seconds, it would also have to able to discharge in seconds. Meaning that its amperage rating would have to be very high. just putting a larger voltage across the battery will not charge it faster if it can't handle the current.
    You can increase the amperage a battery puts out, but at a cost of making the battery bigger and heavier. Car batteries can put out a lot more current than a 9v transistor battery, but are also a lot more bulky and heavy.

    A battery that could recharge in seconds would be huge and impractical.
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  5. #4  
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    I think the answer to this lies in the chemistry of the battery. Chemical reactions are taking place at the cell plates and there is a limited rate at which the ions can move through the electrolyte and limited surface area where it can happen. The rate at which chemical reactions occur depends on temperature, and there is a practical limit on that.
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  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman Silex7's Avatar
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    i can't add more than those two replies..
    i've been training in a car batteries company,..it needed from us to recharge a battery about 4-6 hours,..the problem is you can not activate the chemical reaction between the battery's electrodes to reach the desired minimum time,..it needs restrict conditons, and also not economical.
    Even onthe small batteries,..you can not spend too much money for just saving time and having high voltage recharge in seconds..they can ..but why?

    btw, never call yourself a dumb,..nobody was born with knowledge becareful of what you're saying to yourself because your mind would believe that..
    "Nothing can be accepted in this world, if it did not pass the mathematical proof."

    Leonardo Da Vinci
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370
    I think the answer to this lies in the chemistry of the battery. Chemical reactions are taking place at the cell plates and there is a limited rate at which the ions can move through the electrolyte and limited surface area where it can happen. The rate at which chemical reactions occur depends on temperature, and there is a practical limit on that.
    Very true. And not only that, but there are some very undesirable side effects of try to charge too quickly.

    Let's take a lead-acid (automotive battery) for example. The charging process breaks down the water in the electrolyte into hydrogen and oxygen. The hydrogen simply bubbles off and the oxygen is used to convert the lead sulfate back into lead dioxide and pentoxide. If you attempt to charge too quickly, the oxygen doesn't have time to react and also just bubbles away. And you've just created a bomb simply waiting for a spark to set it off! In addition, a large mount of heat will be created which will cause the lead to expand faster than the case and creates a real risk of rupturing the battery and sending sulfuric acid all over the place - perhaps even explosively.

    Sealed cells - like the common rechargeable used in toys, laptops and other things present an even GREATER danger of exploding and leaking from being overheated.
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  8. #7  
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    So this is actually THE solution:

    http://www.shoutwire.com/viewstory/9..._Electric_Cars
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doice
    So this is actually THE solution:
    But this is not a battery in the strictest sense, its a humungus capacitor which stores electrical charges directly on opposite charged plates but in this case the surface area is so large and so close a huge amount of charge can be put iin. There will still be a maximum rate at which it can charge, there is a simple equation that shows how fast it can happen and individual capacitor technologies can also effect how fast they can charge or discharge. One problem with capacitors is if you want higher voltage and you put them in series like battery cells, you get higher voltage alright but you cut the capacitance in half, so you don't gain as much as you thought you would.
    I am looking out for some company making a combined hybrid battery/capacitor that would store higher charges than either by themselves.

    http://www.shoutwire.com/viewstory/9..._Electric_Cars
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