Notices
Results 1 to 6 of 6
Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By dejawolf

Thread: lightning

  1. #1 lightning 
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    927
    i've been thinking a bit. thunderstorms usually happends when it rains,
    and when you have positive/negative skies, and the opoosite ground.
    what i'm wondering, is the water providing a path for the lightning to travel down?


    sabari raja likes this.
    when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth
    A.C Doyle
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Bachelors Degree
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    NC USA
    Posts
    488
    Artificial lightning can be created in the laboratory,
    no rain required.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    264
    Actually, rain is not required but does play a huge part. That's why there lightning is so rare in the snow, very little moisture. Without rain a much larger build up of energy would be needed and lightning would be MUCH rarer.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4 Re: lightning 
    Forum Junior
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    233
    Quote Originally Posted by dejawolf
    i've been thinking a bit. thunderstorms usually happends when it rains,
    and when you have positive/negative skies, and the opoosite ground.
    what i'm wondering, is the water providing a path for the lightning to travel down?
    No, not really - the atmospheric gasses do that job just fine without the rain.

    But rain/humidity IS necessary for lightning. It's the tossing around of water droplets by the wind that creates the charges necessary to power lightning. (Yes, very short answer, I know - but it serves the purpose here.) :wink:
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    wirral, england
    Posts
    59
    i think im right in saying most lightening strikes go upwards and dissipate into the atmosphere, a strike that does go down is met by an upward strike from the object it is just about to hit, and provides a path to earth
    be nice im new
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Cardiff, Wales
    Posts
    5,810
    the reason why rain and lightning often go together is that the movement of ice particles in clouds build up the charge difference that eventually causes lightning
    when the same ice particles fall down to earth they either melt and come down as rain or they don't you have hail

    having said that, i once witnessed a massive thunder-and-lightning show without a single trace of rain - presumably the ice particles don't always drop out
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •