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Thread: What moves the electrons in the wire?

  1. #1 What moves the electrons in the wire? 
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    What moves the electrons in the wire with current in closed circular loop?


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    Hi,

    what does 'closed circular loop' mean? Are you trying to separate motion of the electron(s ) and the electric current self?

    Thanks,
    Steve


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  4. #3 Re: What moves the electrons in the wire? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by scientist91
    What moves the electrons in the wire with current in closed circular loop?
    It depends. What is the source of the current - a battery or another energized loop (as in a transformer), a moving magnet or what?
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  5. #4  
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    i've been pondering about this stuff too.
    does the electrons move, or do they just create a wave?
    you know, like someone pushing someone pushing someone...
    when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth
    A.C Doyle
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  6. #5  
    Forum Ph.D. Steve Miller's Avatar
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    One fact was, wires are not damaged by the electric current in some way for sure.

    Freely moving electrons inside the wires material should but leave any observable
    traces within, or at the surface of the wire, respectively. Or both of course.

    Steve
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    Quote Originally Posted by dejawolf
    i've been pondering about this stuff too.
    does the electrons move, or do they just create a wave?
    you know, like someone pushing someone pushing someone...
    The very definition of electric current is 'electrons in motion', not some kind of wave.

    It's obviously a very physical thing. Consider two extremely simple examples: one, the exchange of ions in a battery cell; two, the movement of the sweeping electron beam that paints an image on your computer screen or TV.

    If you wish to go farther, then how about the movement of electrons along nerves in the human body? And how about the very visible electric spark that jumps across a gap in a high-voltage circuit? (Not to mention lightning during a thunderstorm.)
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Miller
    One fact was, wires are not damaged by the electric current in some way for sure.

    Freely moving electrons inside the wires material should but leave any observable
    traces within, or at the surface of the wire, respectively. Or both of course.

    Steve
    Hello, Steve,

    I'm not sure exacly what you are trying to say here. Could you explain, please?
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  9. #8  
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    Hello!

    What exactly don't you get? I read over the text again and don't saw anything unclear. Sorry!

    Steve
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    The question is, does the repelling of the electrons move them in wire with current?
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Miller
    Hello!

    What exactly don't you get? I read over the text again and don't saw anything unclear. Sorry!

    Steve
    To you, perhaps, but not to me.

    You are most likely correct (I think) but just try restating it.
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by scientist91
    The question is, does the repelling of the electrons move them in wire with current?
    Not of itself. It takes an external force to make them start moving AND to keep them moving.
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  13. #12  
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    8)
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    I don't think so. If it about electromagnetic induction, then only the electrons in the coil are affected by the moving magnetic field, but not the electrons in the WIRE!
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    I think I see what Scientist91 is getting at. When you close the switch you get current right away, or at close to the speed of light. You don't have to wait for the electrons to go from the negative terminal to the positive. It's like water in a hose. If the hose is full of water you get flow as soon as you open the valve because the water molecules repel each other.

    Steve, I couldn't figure out what you were saying either.
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  16. #15  
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    Quote Originally Posted by scientist91
    I don't think so. If it about electromagnetic induction, then only the electrons in the coil are affected by the moving magnetic field, but not the electrons in the WIRE!
    Sorry, I misunderstood your previous question.

    Yes, once a current is moving in a conductor the other electrons (ahead) are forced to move by the repulsive charge. And it's not just about induction, connecting a battery to a circuit does the same thing.

    If you want to be even more detailed, there is [i]both[i] a pushing (repelling) effect and a pulling (attractive) effect as the area that is forcibly stripped of some of it's electrons becomes positively charged.
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  17. #16  
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    i bumped into this webpage:

    http://amasci.com/amateur/elecdir.html
    it says that "electricity" can flow both directions, and its not just electrons that can flow, but other particles as well.
    when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth
    A.C Doyle
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  18. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by dejawolf
    i bumped into this webpage:

    http://amasci.com/amateur/elecdir.html
    it says that "electricity" can flow both directions, and its not just electrons that can flow, but other particles as well.
    Yes, and the way that article was written was sort of amusing. It was meant to be mi=ore intertaining than actually informative. :wink:

    In truth, it was really doing nothing more than talking about ordinary ion movement in addition to electron flow. (Though I suspect everyone will not readily recognize it. But that's all it was.)
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  19. #18  
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    well, from my point of view, entertaining is the only form of informative i can read, if i lose interest in the subject, i can read 15 pages, but my mind will be elsewhere.
    when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth
    A.C Doyle
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