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Thread: Gravity, and the uniform theory

  1. #1 Gravity, and the uniform theory 
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    I was thinking about it, and having seen the images depicting gravity as warping space-time, and relating the inability to unify the theories on the other forces with that of gravity, a thought formed in my little head - which is probably already old stuff.

    What if gravity as a phenomenon isn't really a 'force' at all, but merely a three-dimensional manifestation of a reality that exists in an extra, fourth if you will, dimension?
    Mass has some effect in this fourth dimension (of unknown characteristics), and as a result we see bodies 'gravitate' toward each other in 3-space.

    One might be suggested to think that in such a scenario, gravity is a phenomenon set totally apart from the theories of the electro-magnetic forces, and the strive to unify the two will forever be an utterly wild goosechase.

    Or it could also be so that the electro-magnetic forces in some way apply in this fourth dimension, and manifests in 3-space as matter moving closer to matter.

    Is this the same as the warping of space-time hypothesis?


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  3. #2  
    Forum Ph.D. Steve Miller's Avatar
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    Reading your post I think you're maneuvering away yourself of the theory of space-time
    was the assumed cause for gravity, heading forward in time but back to citing the
    Newtonian like statements, thematically.

    Newton btw., as for may knowledge, created the term of gravity resp. gravitation. Not
    sure if you knew.

    Steve


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  4. #3  
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    Perhaps I didn't do my homework properly. Newton described the effect, and Einstein described a cause.
    I think my point is, that the 'fabric of space-time' could just be thought of as an other dimension. This other dimension is unseen to us, and we see the effect of interaction of mass in all four (or more) dimensions as gravitation in 3-space, in a way similar to the description given by Rob Bryanton in "Imagining the Tenth Dimesion".
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  5. #4  
    Forum Ph.D. Steve Miller's Avatar
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    I found thinking about gravity a bit more complex. Newton and Einstein do a lot more differ
    about gravity.

    Newton had now idea about space time. Space time was first introduced by Einstein.
    Newton as for his sample with the apple saw surely saw the cause for gravity itself being
    something (magnetism ) on the planet.

    Einstein sees apace time as something to be being in space. As earth moves space-time
    is twisted making gravity.

    So there was Newton stating gravity to be some static occurrence bound to earth while
    Einstein yet links the steady motion of the planet (sorry the Stasi was living closed to my
    flat so I still can't concentrate myself properly {I had to move recently } ) to some physics
    in space making gravity.

    They are both wrong, but do differ in a way which has developed tremendously.
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