Notices
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Can the Standard Model define Dark Matter : Large non-baryonic hadrons made from quarks, etc.?

  1. #1 Can the Standard Model define Dark Matter : Large non-baryonic hadrons made from quarks, etc.? 
    Forum Freshman Double Helix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Posts
    88
    Looking through a google search on something, came across a blurb from someone at the LHC suggesting they had seen a 'very minor, maybe possible hint' of an "quark octet". They actually used this kind of "terminology" as they were not at all sure of what they had seen, but that the "signal" might be related to such a "particle". A quick search indicates such particles are not associated with the WIMPs model for Dark Matter (DM).

    Having very little exposure to all this stuff, found a reference to the hexaquark (1), which apparently has real data suggesting it likely exists, possibly for very extended periods of time. It seems possible that such non-baryonic hadrons came out of the quark-gluon plasma in large numbers, which occurred very early in the BB, before the formation of elements (2). Such particles are postulated as candidates for DM.

    Some extra searches came up with one recent article where it appears that some experts in this field postulate "a stable, neutral, as-yet-undiscovered hadron in the standard model" (3). As this abstract was posted last year, it seems such particles may still be in the running for DM.

    Perhaps simplistically, it seems there are a considerable number of combinations of subatomic particles which could form such DM candidates, and it may actually be composed of more than one form based on quarks, such as quark-gluon combinations. This is all very new to me, but references to such things date back many years, so it does not appear to be coming out of left field, so to say. The LHC is apparently the only place right now to look for them.

    A search of thescienceforum.com has some comments regarding the subject of DM, but most are from quite some time ago.

    Does anyone know of a reference (which is not overly complex, assuming that is even possible) for these hypothetical particles, regarding their possible formation and composition for DM formation during, and their fate after, the BB? And could such particles, perhaps by decay processes, play a role in Dark Energy?

    TIA

    1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexaquark

    2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quark%...93gluon_plasma

    3. https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.10378


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    exchemist
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    London
    Posts
    3,562
    Quote Originally Posted by Double Helix View Post
    Looking through a google search on something, came across a blurb from someone at the LHC suggesting they had seen a 'very minor, maybe possible hint' of an "quark octet". They actually used this kind of "terminology" as they were not at all sure of what they had seen, but that the "signal" might be related to such a "particle". A quick search indicates such particles are not associated with the WIMPs model for Dark Matter (DM).

    Having very little exposure to all this stuff, found a reference to the hexaquark (1), which apparently has real data suggesting it likely exists, possibly for very extended periods of time. It seems possible that such non-baryonic hadrons came out of the quark-gluon plasma in large numbers, which occurred very early in the BB, before the formation of elements (2). Such particles are postulated as candidates for DM.

    Some extra searches came up with one recent article where it appears that some experts in this field postulate "a stable, neutral, as-yet-undiscovered hadron in the standard model" (3). As this abstract was posted last year, it seems such particles may still be in the running for DM.

    Perhaps simplistically, it seems there are a considerable number of combinations of subatomic particles which could form such DM candidates, and it may actually be composed of more than one form based on quarks, such as quark-gluon combinations. This is all very new to me, but references to such things date back many years, so it does not appear to be coming out of left field, so to say. The LHC is apparently the only place right now to look for them.

    A search of thescienceforum.com has some comments regarding the subject of DM, but most are from quite some time ago.

    Does anyone know of a reference (which is not overly complex, assuming that is even possible) for these hypothetical particles, regarding their possible formation and composition for DM formation during, and their fate after, the BB? And could such particles, perhaps by decay processes, play a role in Dark Energy?

    TIA

    1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexaquark

    2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quark%...93gluon_plasma

    3. https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.10378
    I knew nothing about this so can't help you, but thanks for drawing it to my attention. I see this entity has spin zero and no charge, so it would not be expected to interact with EM radiation and would indeed be "dark". It would also be quite hard to detect, I suppose, for the same reason. Though, unlike the neutrino, it would make its presence felt through its mass.

    Interesting.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman Double Helix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Posts
    88
    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    I knew nothing about this so can't help you, but thanks for drawing it to my attention. I see this entity has spin zero and no charge, so it would not be expected to interact with EM radiation and would indeed be "dark". It would also be quite hard to detect, I suppose, for the same reason. Though, unlike the neutrino, it would make its presence felt through its mass.

    Interesting.
    Agreed. It is very interesting, and it seems to offer a lot of variables for those familiar with EPs and the Standard Model.

    And we may not know all of those from which such constructs could be assembled. Only that they must have formed very early, when energy was at extreme density (avoiding aspects suggested in neutron stars).

    We both need a real high-brow in EPs and DM to provide some reasonable evaluation.

    Thanks for the feedback, exchemist.
    Last edited by Double Helix; February 10th, 2021 at 08:37 PM.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. New Additions to the Standard Model?
    By SatanicScientist in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: October 23rd, 2012, 06:20 PM
  2. the standard model
    By Brandon in forum Physics
    Replies: 107
    Last Post: September 28th, 2011, 06:52 AM
  3. Large Hadron Collider vs Dark matter
    By PetTastic in forum Astronomy & Cosmology
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: August 9th, 2011, 02:36 AM
  4. Baryonic, Dark Matter/ Energy Proportions Calculations?
    By Rhoops in forum Astronomy & Cosmology
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: August 19th, 2010, 02:16 PM
  5. Problems with the standard model
    By Astronautilus in forum Astronomy & Cosmology
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: March 11th, 2010, 10:09 AM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •