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Thread: Voltage

  1. #1 Voltage 
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    Can I power a 120 volt light bulb with a current less than 120 volts?
    All rechargeable AA batteries have a 1.2 volt ratting, while regular AA's have a 1.5 Volt ratting, is this a problem, as in, would putting a 1.2 volt battery in a 1.5 volt device hurt it or show any difference in performance?
    Can I plug a light bulb directly into the wall?
    Would connecting a plug and two wires into the wall outlet, and connecting the two wires for ma 120 Volt electromagnet without shorting the house?


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  3. #2  
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    You can power the lamp with less than the rated voltage but you will then get less than the rated watts out. If the voltage is too low, it won't even light up. The power is in proportion to the square of the voltage.

    The battery will probably work okay. It won't hurt anything. It would be like having a slightly discharged regular battery.

    A light bulb doesn't have a plug to plug into the wall unless it is in a lamp. Obviously you can plug a lamp into a wall outlet so I don't understand the question.

    If the electromagnet is rated for at least 120 vac and no more than about 10 amps you can plug it into the wall outlet but don't make some half baked thing with bare wires exposed that you can get shocked on. You could kill yourself playing around like that.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Senior anand_kapadia's Avatar
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    I haven't seen 1.5v bulbs lighting up a 120v bulb.
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    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    All of the questions you are asking can be answered with knowledge of one the most basic principles of electricity...."Ohm's Law". It encompasses the relationship between voltage (measured in volts), current (measured in amps), resistance (measured in ohms), and power (measured in watts).

    Voltage (V) = current (I) times resistance (R)

    Power (P) = current (I) times voltage (V)

    They are simple formulas, but they can explain alot about the way electricity behaves. If I were you, I'd google "Ohm's law" and read up about it...it's quite fascinating.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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    Forum Professor river_rat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968
    All of the questions you are asking can be answered with knowledge of one the most basic principles of electricity...."Ohm's Law". It encompasses the relationship between voltage (measured in volts), current (measured in amps), resistance (measured in ohms), and power (measured in watts).

    Voltage (V) = current (I) times resistance (R)

    Power (P) = current (I) times voltage (V)

    They are simple formulas, but they can explain alot about the way electricity behaves. If I were you, I'd google "Ohm's law" and read up about it...it's quite fascinating.
    Well for when it works yeah
    As is often the case with technical subjects we are presented with an unfortunate choice: an explanation that is accurate but incomprehensible, or comprehensible but wrong.
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    Forum Freshman wonkothesane's Avatar
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    If you don't know the difference between power, voltage and current or basic circuit analysis like ohms law I'd suggest you stay away from the mains supply. Use a plug pack or a few batteries and some smaller light bulbs to play around with and read a text book.

    Well for when it works yeah
    Are you saying there are times when it doesn't?
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