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Thread: Anti-mater

  1. #1 Anti-mater 
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    Hi
    I want to know more about anti-mater.
    I learn that the anti-mater explode in contact of mater but if example an atom of antihydrogen is in contact with carbon will it explode?


    what the limits of physic?
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  3. #2 Response* 
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    Yes it would explode, unless you are thinking of some odd exception that might be applied to the reaction of those two elements. I am not sure on the exact process involved, or the physical make up of the material- I do not even think that that information is openly available to the public. I can hypothesize a few things though. I think that the anti matter can be thought of as a breaking in a micro energy field that holds together the sub-atomic particles that form protons, neutrons and electrons. When this breaks, the particles spread away from each other at unfathomable speeds, forming what we see an explosion. What these fields are and why they break i am not sure... but it might be that these fields are just like a smaller version of an electrical field, and that the attraction between regular matter and anti-matter forms so much momentum that the ratio of available potential force is exceeded by the impact force, and hence the dispersing matter, which may be further accelerated by the breaking of micro bonds that then possibly reverse themselves due to a forcefull direction change, and therefore repel the matter.


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    Forum Professor leohopkins's Avatar
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    Its not an explosion. Its an annihalation.
    The hand of time rested on the half-hour mark, and all along that old front line of the English there came a whistling and a crying. The men of the first wave climbed up the parapets, in tumult, darkness, and the presence of death, and having done with all pleasant things, advanced across No Man's Land to begin the Battle of the Somme. - Poet John Masefield.

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    Yeah, if you want to be specific.
    Of all the wonders in the universe, none is likely more fascinating and complicated than human nature.

    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe."

    "Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocrities. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence"

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    Forum Radioactive Isotope mitchellmckain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leohopkins
    Its not an explosion. Its an annihalation.
    Yeah but what does annihilation mean?

    The energy (including the mass energy) cannot disappear.

    Mostly it means, therefore, the production of high energy gamma rays.

    When it is just one particle annihilating one antiparticle I am not sure whether you would call the resulting production of two gamma ray photons an explosion or not.

    But consider for example a fission of a uranium 235 atom. Would you call that an explosion? But an anti-proton annihilating with a proton would produce more than nine times as much energy. So would you call that an explosion? Like wise if an anti proton encounterd a uranium atom, the uranium atom would fly apart with between 9 and 10 times as much energy as a mere fission of that atom. Wouldn't you call that an explosion?
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  7. #6  
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    anti-matter is the exact opposite of matter. Matter , at the atomic level, is a positively charged nucleus, that is very dense, and relatively massive, surrounded by very light electrons forming clouds around the nucleus. Antimatter, has subatomic particles with same mass, but opposite charges as that of matter. Instead of negatively charged electrons in a cloud, there are positively charged positrons in a cloud. The nucleus is naegatively charged. Since the particles of matter and antimatter have same mass and opposite charge, they seem to completely cancel out each other when they come in contact and that is called annihilation.
    In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, however, there is.
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    Forum Radioactive Isotope mitchellmckain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scientist-to-be
    anti-matter is the exact opposite of matter. Matter , at the atomic level, is a positively charged nucleus, that is very dense, and relatively massive, surrounded by very light electrons forming clouds around the nucleus. Antimatter, has subatomic particles with same mass, but opposite charges as that of matter. Instead of negatively charged electrons in a cloud, there are positively charged positrons in a cloud. The nucleus is naegatively charged. Since the particles of matter and antimatter have same mass and opposite charge, they seem to completely cancel out each other when they come in contact and that is called annihilation.
    Incorrect. They do not cancel each other completely. There is one thing that remains. Energy. Energy = mass times the speed of light squared plus what ever kinetic energy they had as well. Particle accelerators kind of do this in reverse. They speed up particles to a near light velocity (giving them an enormous kinetic energy) and smash them into something, and you know what happens? A lot of that kinetic energy gets converted into mass energy. But in order to conserve things like charge, baryon number, charm, strangeness, lepton number and all those other conserved quantities, particles are produced in matter - antimatter pairs.
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    Yes, you're right, a huge quantity of energy is produced. I missed that in my post. Actually, I think that this huge energy yield is the reason behind industrial interest in antimatter technology. Large quantities of energy are produced with no byproducts during the annihilation, so if antimatter is used as an energy source, it would be one of the best in the world, very efficient and non pollutant at the same time. But the challenge now is with finding a method to store antimatter. I heard that the energy produced is in the form of photons ( light energy). Is that true?
    In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, however, there is.
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  10. #9  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope mitchellmckain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scientist-to-be
    Yes, you're right, a huge quantity of energy is produced. I missed that in my post. Actually, I think that this huge energy yield is the reason behind industrial interest in antimatter technology. Large quantities of energy are produced with no byproducts during the annihilation, so if antimatter is used as an energy source, it would be one of the best in the world, very efficient and non pollutant at the same time. But the challenge now is with finding a method to store antimatter. I heard that the energy produced is in the form of photons ( light energy). Is that true?
    It is not really a source of energy, because we cannot dig up antimatter anywhere, but it might be a fuel for a starship.

    What it produces depend on what particles are annihilating and what their velocities are when they collide. When an electron and a positron collide at low velocity there is not much other than two photons that they could produce. They could of course produce an electon-positron pair but then that would be interpreted as no annihilation at all. Colliding them at much higher veocities might give you enough energy to produce other pairs of particles.

    But a collision of a proton and an antiproton even at low velocities can produce any number of different particle-antiparticle pairs, including electron-postitron pairs. I have been trying to find a web page with the low energy proton-antiproton annihilation cross sections on it, but it is difficult to find. It is possible that the problem is too messy to calculate and I have seen some indication that these annihations produce a whole spew of particle pairs (pions mostly). protons have a mass 938 compared to the pion mass of 140, kaon mass of 495, electron mass of .511, so a proton annihilation has enough energy to produce 6 pion pairs, only one kaon pair, but over 1800 electron-positron pairs, any left over energy would go into kinetic energy or photons.
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