Notices
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Bowling Ball Argument

  1. #1 Bowling Ball Argument 
    Time Lord zinjanthropos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Driving in my car
    Posts
    5,259
    I bowl in a 10 pin bowling league once a week. It's all the bowling I do but there are others in the league that bowl 3-4 times a week. We had a bit of a argument going on the other day. Here's the skinny...

    Bowling pins on average weigh 3.5 lbs. Bowling balls weigh between 14-16 lbs. So if one player throws a 14 pounder and the other a 16 with the same speed and each ball hits a single pin at the same angle, will the lighter ball deflect more to one side than the heavier would?

    This came up because no matter how hard you throw a ball at 10 pins, bowlers can still end up with the same pins configurations once ball (First shot) has made contact and passed through. Doesn't seem to make much difference how hard one throws IOW. Although a lighter ball seems more prone to unfavourable pins left over (Splits) for the second shot (spare shot). People argue that a heavier ball deflects less than a lighter ball.. Is this true?

    edit: last line


    Last edited by zinjanthropos; February 6th, 2020 at 12:44 PM.
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    exchemist
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    London
    Posts
    3,393
    Quote Originally Posted by zinjanthropos View Post
    I bowl in a 10 pin bowling league once a week. It's all the bowling I do but there are others in the league that bowl 3-4 times a week. We had a bit of a argument going on the other day. Here's the skinny...

    Bowling pins on average weigh 3.5 lbs. Bowling balls weigh between 14-16 lbs. So if one player throws a 14 pounder and the other a 16 with the same speed and each ball hits a single pin at the same angle, will the lighter ball deflect more to one side than the heavier would?

    This came up because no matter how hard you throw a ball at 10 pins, bowlers can still end up with the same pins configurations once ball (First shot) has made contact and passed through. Doesn't seem to make much difference how hard one throws IOW. Although a lighter ball seems more prone to unfavourable pins left over (Splits) for the second shot (spare shot). People argue that a heavier ball deflects less than a lighter ball.. Is this true?

    edit: last line
    Yes. The more massive ball will be deflected slightly less.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Time Lord zinjanthropos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Driving in my car
    Posts
    5,259
    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by zinjanthropos View Post
    I bowl in a 10 pin bowling league once a week. It's all the bowling I do but there are others in the league that bowl 3-4 times a week. We had a bit of a argument going on the other day. Here's the skinny...

    Bowling pins on average weigh 3.5 lbs. Bowling balls weigh between 14-16 lbs. So if one player throws a 14 pounder and the other a 16 with the same speed and each ball hits a single pin at the same angle, will the lighter ball deflect more to one side than the heavier would?

    This came up because no matter how hard you throw a ball at 10 pins, bowlers can still end up with the same pins configurations once ball (First shot) has made contact and passed through. Doesn't seem to make much difference how hard one throws IOW. Although a lighter ball seems more prone to unfavourable pins left over (Splits) for the second shot (spare shot). People argue that a heavier ball deflects less than a lighter ball.. Is this true?

    edit: last line
    Yes. The more massive ball will be deflected slightly less.
    Is that because the pin or the ball compresses a bit upon impact?
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,214
    Quote Originally Posted by zinjanthropos View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by zinjanthropos View Post
    I bowl in a 10 pin bowling league once a week. It's all the bowling I do but there are others in the league that bowl 3-4 times a week. We had a bit of a argument going on the other day. Here's the skinny...

    Bowling pins on average weigh 3.5 lbs. Bowling balls weigh between 14-16 lbs. So if one player throws a 14 pounder and the other a 16 with the same speed and each ball hits a single pin at the same angle, will the lighter ball deflect more to one side than the heavier would?

    This came up because no matter how hard you throw a ball at 10 pins, bowlers can still end up with the same pins configurations once ball (First shot) has made contact and passed through. Doesn't seem to make much difference how hard one throws IOW. Although a lighter ball seems more prone to unfavourable pins left over (Splits) for the second shot (spare shot). People argue that a heavier ball deflects less than a lighter ball.. Is this true?

    edit: last line
    Yes. The more massive ball will be deflected slightly less.
    Is that because the pin or the ball compresses a bit upon impact?
    It's because the ratio of ball mass to pin mass is greater for the heavier ball than it is for the lighter ball. Imagine that it was a ping pong ball moving at the same speed hitting the pin. The pin would barely budge, while the ping pong ball would defect a great deal.
    Go in the total opposite direction and imagine a ball with the mass of a city bus, and you would be hard pressed to notice any deflection on the part of the ball. It would knock the pin out of the way almost as if it wasn't even there. The difference between light bowling ball vs. heavy bowling ball just falls along this line of progression.
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


    Edit/Delete Message
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Time Lord zinjanthropos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Driving in my car
    Posts
    5,259
    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    It's because the ratio of ball mass to pin mass is greater for the heavier ball than it is for the lighter ball. Imagine that it was a ping pong ball moving at the same speed hitting the pin. The pin would barely budge, while the ping pong ball would defect a great deal.
    Go in the total opposite direction and imagine a ball with the mass of a city bus, and you would be hard pressed to notice any deflection on the part of the ball. It would knock the pin out of the way almost as if it wasn't even there. The difference between light bowling ball vs. heavy bowling ball just falls along this line of progression.
    Thanks. I like the bus analogy.

    Curious.... if I fire a photon at a flat surface from a 45 angle will it bounce off at the same angle? I know I can’t fire an electron at c but if I could get close to c utilizing same method, would the electron act in the same manner as the photon?

    I’m thinking the electron would break apart and if that is true, is there a speed I could fire the electron at to mimic the photon striking the flat surface?
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK
    Posts
    5,373
    1) Electrons won't break apart, they are elementary particles.
    2) what happens depends on the energy of the photon or electron. Look up diffraction and the photoelectric effect.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Time Lord zinjanthropos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Driving in my car
    Posts
    5,259
    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    1) Electrons won't break apart, they are elementary particles.
    Doh! I hate repeating mistakes.!
    All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability...Hume
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Bowling "Strike-thrower"
    By jocular in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: May 29th, 2013, 08:17 PM
  2. Bowling for columbine... double take
    By marcusclayman in forum Behavior and Psychology
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: March 14th, 2012, 01:30 PM
  3. The old common argument...
    By mercu in forum Biology
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: July 12th, 2011, 11:43 AM
  4. ARGUMENT FROM . .
    By korben in forum Scientific Study of Religion
    Replies: 50
    Last Post: March 10th, 2010, 07:24 AM
  5. Bowling
    By AlexP in forum Physics
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: September 24th, 2006, 11:05 AM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •