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Thread: How hard do I need to slap a chicken to cook it

  1. #1 How hard do I need to slap a chicken to cook it 
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    Based on the idea that thermal energy is hectic kinetic energy. Is it better to slap repeatedly, or one big slap? If more than once, how many and how hard? If only once, how hard?


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  3. #2  
    Time Lord Paleoichneum's Avatar
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    I hear ovens work better


    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
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    Of course they do. That's boring though
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  5. #4  
    exchemist
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Summer View Post
    Of course they do. That's boring though
    Why don't you do the maths, then?

    Assume a mass for your hand/forearm and a speed for the slap and apply E=mv²/2 to work out the energy imparted per slap.

    Then you can assume the specific heat capacity of flesh is close to that of water, which will allow you to calculate, per kg of meat, how much energy is needed to raise its temperature to say 70C, which I should think will be enough to cook it.

    And if you put the formulae into a spreadsheet, you can play around with the speed of your hand as a variable, to see how long it takes under various speed scenarios.

    In reality there will be other aspects, to do with the thermal conductivity of flesh and its tendency to disintegrate due to repeated bruising, etc., but for a first approximation I suggest leaving all that aside, to get an idea of what you would be looking at.

    Let us know how you get on. I think you may be surprised how much effort it requires.
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  6. #5  
    Forum Junior anticorncob28's Avatar
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    The specific heat of water is 4.186 joules per gram per degree Celsius, if I want to warm it by 50C and it weighs half a kilogram I need 105,000 joules of energy (4.186*50*500). If this is mv²/2 and my hand weighs an eighth of a kilogram the speed will be 1300 meters per second (105,000*2/0.125, then square root this), which is 4700 kilometers per hour or about 3000 miles per hour.

    Did I do that right? Honestly, the idea that I could heat something up that much just by slapping it seems so far-fetched that I expected to need the relativistic formula for kinetic energy.
    "A 4 degree Celsius warmer world can, and must be, avoided"
    -Jim Young Kim (World Bank President)
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  7. #6  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Questions like this always remind me of the unexpectedly bad effects of relativistic baseball: "What would happen if you tried to hit a baseball pitched at 90% the speed of light?"

    https://what-if.xkcd.com/1/
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
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  8. #7  
    exchemist
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    Quote Originally Posted by anticorncob28 View Post
    The specific heat of water is 4.186 joules per gram per degree Celsius, if I want to warm it by 50C and it weighs half a kilogram I need 105,000 joules of energy (4.186*50*500). If this is mv²/2 and my hand weighs an eighth of a kilogram the speed will be 1300 meters per second (105,000*2/0.125, then square root this), which is 4700 kilometers per hour or about 3000 miles per hour.

    Did I do that right? Honestly, the idea that I could heat something up that much just by slapping it seems so far-fetched that I expected to need the relativistic formula for kinetic energy.
    Looks reasonable. But from this it is evident that a series of repeated slaps at lower speed will be more effective, since one presumes tha tone wants to be able to find something identifiable to eat, after the collision!
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