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Thread: Vacuum "Container"

  1. #1 Vacuum "Container" 
    Forum Sophomore Kabooom's Avatar
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    Well I'm more so looking for some pointers or maybe a search term, because currently I'm stuck.


    If you were to have a vacuum inside a container, the atmosphere exerts 14.7 PSI on the container at sea level. Could anyone give me at least a basic topic to research to learn how to calculate the thickness of a material (aluminum or steel) needed to make a rectangular prism that could withstand this vacuum?


    Thanks, not sure if this is the best section of the forums but it seemed the most fitting. Moderator please move if not.


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  3. #2  
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    You could look for 'pressurised container design, but I suspect you will find they all suggest cylindrical semi-spherical designs. THe alternative is to realise that you are looking for a pressure differential of 1Kg/cm^2 (approx 14psi) and use data on the strength of materials to get a bit closer.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Sophomore Kabooom's Avatar
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    Okay thanks Megabrain! Exactly what I was looking for, some more technical terms. And yeah I was thinking that most would say a cylinder, but that isn't applicable in this scenario.

    I think the pressure differential number you gave me should help a lot, thanks!
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  5. #4  
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    You can build a test object and apply pressure to it, which will give you a good idea, the point about sperical/cylindrical containers is that the material is either in compression or tension where metals are fairly strong, as soon as you design a 'flat' surface then the material is subject to 'sheer' stress which for flat metalic plate is not so hot, keep an eye open for the ratio of thickness to side length. THink of a simple piece of steel piano wire, typical breaking strain 180KG, sheer distortion begins to occur under just it's own weight when more than a few inches long...
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