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Thread: Time & the Light Clock

  1. #1 Time & the Light Clock 
    Jon
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    Hello all,

    I don't have much time to write this, but it should be straight-forward. If we measure time with a light clock, we get the problem of it slowing down for observers in motion relative to others because light speed is always the same.

    What if we measure time with a bouncing ball clock? There is nothing which states balls must bounce at the same speed for all observers, so is it not possible that a bouncing ball clock would measure the same time for everyone, with just different speeds?

    If this is the case, then does time really go funky, or is it just our measurement? Is it just our measurement method that causes our measurements to differ relative to motion?

    That's the best I can explain it, though it should be rather clear to people more familiar with the issue than I am as to what I am talking about.

    Thank you all for anyone who adds some input,
    Jon


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    Forum Professor leohopkins's Avatar
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    No, because the atomic clock which is based on the half life of er...something beginning with C, forgotten the element, anyway it is accurate to 1 second within a million years. However, as it is so accurate, when transporting the atomic time piece from one country to another via an airplane, engineers and scientists need to recalibrate it, taking into account the time dilation (however small that maybe) that occured whilst the clock was airbourne and travelling at 600 mph.


    The hand of time rested on the half-hour mark, and all along that old front line of the English there came a whistling and a crying. The men of the first wave climbed up the parapets, in tumult, darkness, and the presence of death, and having done with all pleasant things, advanced across No Man's Land to begin the Battle of the Somme. - Poet John Masefield.

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    Forum Ph.D. Nevyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leohopkins
    No, because the atomic clock which is based on the half life of er...something beginning with C, forgotten the element, anyway it is accurate to 1 second within a million years. However, as it is so accurate, when transporting the atomic time piece from one country to another via an airplane, engineers and scientists need to recalibrate it, taking into account the time dilation (however small that maybe) that occured whilst the clock was airbourne and travelling at 600 mph.
    The element would be an isotope of Ceasium i believe
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    Forum Professor leohopkins's Avatar
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    Thats the one !
    The hand of time rested on the half-hour mark, and all along that old front line of the English there came a whistling and a crying. The men of the first wave climbed up the parapets, in tumult, darkness, and the presence of death, and having done with all pleasant things, advanced across No Man's Land to begin the Battle of the Somme. - Poet John Masefield.

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