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Thread: Understanding Down Quark Decay?

  1. #1 Understanding Down Quark Decay? 
    (6/5*Phi^2)-Pi=.000048132 devin-m's Avatar
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    I seek a better understanding of the process through which Down Quarks are known to decay. Would anyone kindly be willing to explain to me the step by step process of down quark decay as known by science in as much detail as possible?


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    up and down quarks are the ends of decay chains. They might transform into each other (electron or positron emission from a nucleus).


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    (6/5*Phi^2)-Pi=.000048132 devin-m's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mathman View Post
    up and down quarks are the ends of decay chains. They might transform into each other (electron or positron emission from a nucleus).
    My understanding is that a free neutron consists of 2 down quarks and an up quark & according to its half life the free neutron decays to a proton, & the proton consists of 1 down quark and 2 up quarks.

    I seek a better understanding of the step-by-step process known by science resulting in one of the down quarks being substituted by an up quark in the final proton.
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    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Does this help: Decay Paths for Quarks

    If not, you may need to be a bit more specific about which part you don't understand.
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    (6/5*Phi^2)-Pi=.000048132 devin-m's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Does this help: Decay Paths for Quarks

    If not, you may need to be a bit more specific about which part you don't understand.
    thank you the link was indeed helpful & informative.

    my understanding is the neutrino and electron emitted in the end by the free-neutron-to-proton decay are each thought to carry away variable amounts of energy from the down quark transformation/decay as supported with observational evidence in the form of the electron energy spectrum as referenced by the following charts from Chapter 10.3 Griffiths Elementary Particle Physics:





    My understanding is the neutrino emission is measured with high confidence as a half spin particle, but other half spin particles can be odd numbered composite particles or individual particles, so which experiments, if any, have ruled out the possibility of the neutrino being an odd numbered composite particle (since some half spin particles can be composite), with a high degree of certainty?

    I seek to understand what determinations have been made with 100% confidence that the emitted neutrino certainly consists of definitely not more than 1 fundamental particle.

    With regard to the observed "tiny" mass of the neutrino, which particular experiments, if any, besides the electron energy spectrum have been used to "double check" & confirm this "tiny" mass estimate? In the event an odd-composite 1/2 spin neutrino hasn't been 100% ruled out-- if neutrinos were odd-numbered composite particles, could this conceivably affect the mass-determination-from-electron-energy-spectrum interpretation? (In other words how do we know the cause of the variety in electron energy spectrum isn't a result of the orbital dynamics of the separation of the electron from a composite particle half spin neutrino?) If it isn't 100% ruled out that the neutrino is composite, is it still logical to attempt to determine with 100% certainty the mass of the neutrino from the energy difference between the highest energy electron emissions?
    Last edited by devin-m; October 31st, 2017 at 12:21 PM.
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    (6/5*Phi^2)-Pi=.000048132 devin-m's Avatar
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    I've gone ahead and posted my personal theory in the personal theory section: http://www.thescienceforum.com/perso...y-section.html -- Also, originally posted 3-23-17 to 7-25-17 on a different forum at: Theory of Everything - Standard Model 2.0

    (Hoping to keep this section strictly devoted to the known answers to physical problems.)

    Quote Originally Posted by devin-m View Post
    My understanding is the neutrino emission is measured with high confidence as a half spin particle, but other half spin particles can be odd numbered composite particles or individual particles, so which experiments, if any, have ruled out the possibility of the neutrino being an odd numbered composite particle (since some half spin particles can be composite), with a high degree of certainty?

    I seek to understand what determinations have been made with 100% confidence that the emitted neutrino certainly consists of definitely not more than 1 fundamental particle.

    With regard to the observed "tiny" mass of the neutrino, which particular experiments, if any, besides the electron energy spectrum have been used to "double check" & confirm this "tiny" mass estimate? In the event an odd-composite 1/2 spin neutrino hasn't been 100% ruled out-- if neutrinos were odd-numbered composite particles, could this conceivably affect the mass-determination-from-electron-energy-spectrum interpretation? (In other words how do we know the cause of the variety in electron energy spectrum isn't a result of the orbital dynamics of the separation of the electron from a composite particle half spin neutrino?) If it isn't 100% ruled out that the neutrino is composite, is it still logical to attempt to determine with 100% certainty the mass of the neutrino from the energy difference between the highest energy electron emissions?
    For example, if we look at 100 computer simulations of the evolution of orbital dynamics of a stellar system involving 6 gravitationally interacting stars that result in one of the stars being ejected from the system at high velocity (assuming all stars have same mass and initial kinetic energy, but using random initial location and kinetic energy vectors), does it make sense to determine the mass of the 5 remaining gravitationally bound stars from the difference in kinetic energy between the 2 highest velocity ejected stars from the 100 simulations?

    Wiki "Trapezia": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_s...e_star_systems "Trapezia are usually very young, unstable systems. These are thought to form in stellar nurseries, and quickly fragment into stable multiple stars, which in the process may eject components as galactic high-velocity stars.[28][29] They are named after the multiple star system known as the Trapezium Cluster in the heart of the Orion Nebula.[28] Such systems are not rare, and commonly appear close to or within bright nebulae. These stars have no standard hierarchical arrangements, but compete for stable orbits, where the center of gravity is not fixed at some point but moves as the stars change their mutual positions. This relationship is called interplay.[30] Such stars eventually settle down to a close binary with a distant companion, with the other star(s) previously in the system ejected into interstellar space at high velocities.[30] Example of such events may explain the runaway stars that might have been ejected during a collision of two binary star groups or a multiple system. This event is credited with ejecting AE Aurigae, Mu Columbae and 53 Arietis at above 200 kms−1 and has been traced to the Trapezium cluster in the Orion Nebula some two million years ago."


    Image Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_system
    Caption: Multiple Star System Orbital Hierarchies
    Last edited by devin-m; November 8th, 2017 at 12:31 PM.
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