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Thread: Dimensions

  1. #1 Dimensions 
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
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    Apparently extra dimensions are not discounted in the attempt to model physics at the boundary of what we have observed till now.

    I wonder how we would notice that there was an extra dimension if we came across one?

    Would one give away tale be if an object reappeared in a spatially distinct area from where it was previously observed ?If ,say it disappeared off the radar and showed up somewhere else.

    Or if an object just disappeared for no known reason?

    I appreciate no one is probably looking for this kind of a thing;they are just making multi-dimensional models and seeing if they are good predictors (I guess)


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  3. #2  
    Forum Junior AndresKiani's Avatar
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    Roughly speaking, one would detect these extra dimensions in high energy collisions of subatomic particles. We know the physical conditions prior to the collision, therefore we know the kinetic energy or momentum for example, this allows experimentalists to look for unaccounted changes in the physical parameters. If there are unaccounted changes, the hope is that theoretical frameworks that incorporate extra dimensions would be able to account for them in those extra-dimensions.

    This is my understanding of it.


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  4. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndresKiani View Post
    this allows experimentalists to look for unaccounted changes in the physical parameters.
    It would be interesting to know of any candidate observations.

    Of course the chances of my actually understanding why they might be candidate observations would probably be extremely slim
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  5. #4  
    Moderator Moderator Markus Hanke's Avatar
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    It all depends on what size and structure such dimensions would have; perhaps you might find this one interesting:

    Search for Extra Dimensions
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Hanke View Post
    It all depends on what size and structure such dimensions would have; perhaps you might find this one interesting:

    Search for Extra Dimensions
    Thanks. Without trying to explain this result** to me do you think this might have any bearing on what is in your link ? (pretty "ancient" ,by the way -2001! )
    https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...s-quantum-test

    It is not exploring gravitational effects at smaller intervals in a similar way to what is described in your link,is it ?

    **by "this result" I mean what is in the link I am posting(which I don't claim to understand)
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  7. #6  
    Moderator Moderator Markus Hanke's Avatar
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    The link you posted deals with testing the equivalence principle ( i.e. the equivalence between uniform acceleration and the presence of a uniform gravitational field in small local region ) not for macroscopic objects, but for quantum systems - in this case an atom in a superposition of states. The result is that the equivalence principle still applies.

    This is not immediately connected to the search for extra dimensions.

    Let me give a real world example of what extra dimensions would do. As you probably know from high school physics, the intensity of radiation (e.g.) drops off with the square of the distance - the “inverse square law”. However, this is true only as long as you have exactly three dimensions of space. If you were to add an additional spatial (macroscopic) dimension, this would become an inverse cube law - of course with noticeable and immediately measurable consequences.
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  8. #7  
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    some comments that might be related to the topic

    A vector space X is said to be finite dimensional if there is a positiveinteger n such that X contains a linearly independent set of n vectors whereas any set of n + 1 or more vectors of X is linearly dependent. n is called the dimension of X, written n = dim X. By definition, X = {O}is finite dimensional and dim X = 0. If X is not finite dimensional, it issaid to be infinite dimensional.

    here we cannot show/draw the graphs at R^{n} where n > 3
    in my first article (which unfortunately I could not have made publish it yet) I was thinking that the 4th or more dimensional space could show at least one of these

    1) all properties of waves (all types)
    2) emotions without asking them
    3) interference to the time (this is a controversial issue at the related environment of science. I saw at a few articles and they say that the time can be interferred but where is an example??)
    Last edited by unknown_artist; January 9th, 2018 at 06:56 AM.
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