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Thread: Cooling a solid to absolute zero

  1. #1 Cooling a solid to absolute zero 
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    Heya!

    I'm currently working on some fantasy setting, and i like to mix magic with real life science, at the very least i try to find a ''logical'' explanation to how magic works.

    Let's say someone took a cube a iron, 1kg, at regular atmospheric pressure, and then cooled it close to absolute zero. While iron does become brittle at low temperature, would there be a point where it can't even support it's own shape and the cube would eventually shatter and even fall into dust?

    Couldn't quite find an answer to this, so i thought i'd ask around, maybe someone has some better source than i do. Thanks!


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  3. #2  
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    I don't think so


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  4. #3  
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    It won't shatter if there is no external force applied to it
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    If the iron cube achieves absolute zero, the atoms would stop moving thus the vibration of the object will stop.
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  6. #5  
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    It will support it's own weight because the atoms aren't moving at all. They're like in a frozen state. But if a slight external force is applied to it, it may shatter and crumble.
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    Genius Duck Moderator Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    My first thought was much the same as Vader's.
    But then: A material is brittle if, when subjected to stress , it breaks.

    Internal stress IS caused by the material's own weight, thus it comes down to: how brittle is iron at ~0K and how much stress is applied by its own weight?
    The latter is relatively easily calculable, the former (I suspect) not so much...
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    Forum Professor pyoko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    My first thought was much the same as Vader's.
    But then: A material is brittle if, when subjected to stress , it breaks.

    Internal stress IS caused by the material's own weight, thus it comes down to: how brittle is iron at ~0K and how much stress is applied by its own weight?
    The latter is relatively easily calculable, the former (I suspect) not so much...
    If it was possible to go to zero K, the piece of iron might form a sphere in zero G. If its own force works on it being "ultimate brittle". Even if it was "100% brittle" at zero K, would it remain so if there is force applied on itself?
    It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by VaderLearnsScience View Post
    It will support it's own weight because the atoms aren't moving at all. They're like in a frozen state. But if a slight external force is applied to it, it may shatter and crumble.
    Why do you think that? Do not confuse brittle/ductile with strength. They are not the same.
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