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Thread: The "detailed" Branches of Physics?

  1. #1 The "detailed" Branches of Physics? 
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    Hello, this is my first post

    I have the luck to have a copy of the Encypaedia Brittanica in my bookshelf and maybe some of you will know about the Propaedia edition whose goal is to give a coherent guide to the "Branches of Knowledge" as it calls it. It aims to help an inquisitive reader have an overview of what and how he wants to learn about.. well, everything. However, I must say that as a Physics student I find the section dedicated to the sciences a bit too general for my needs. So what I'm asking is this: do you know of a book /article/site that has the same goal but particularly for Physics? A guide for those that aim to have good understanding of nearly all (or the most important branches) of Physics. Titles that lead to titles that lead to detailed subjects or textbooks (eg Classical Mechanics-> Mechanincs -> Fluid Mechanics -> Lundau's tome).


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  3. #2  
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    All I can think of at the moment is Landau and Lifshitz's Course of Theoretical Physics. It includes classical mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, quantum electrodynamics, statistical thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, theory of elasticity, electrodynamics of continuous media, and physical kinetics. I'm not sure I'd recommend Landau and Lifshitz to someone unfamiliar with these topics, however. They can be tough to follow even for people who have seen the material before.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Tehol Beddict View Post
    Hello, this is my first post
    Hello and welcome.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tehol Beddict View Post
    So what I'm asking is this: do you know of a book /article/site that has the same goal but particularly for Physics? A guide for those that aim to have good understanding of nearly all (or the most important branches) of Physics. Titles that lead to titles that lead to detailed subjects or textbooks (eg Classical Mechanics-> Mechanincs -> Fluid Mechanics -> Lundau's tome).
    This might help. Course Catalogue | The Theoretical Minimum :-)

    PS The Khan Academy as a free educational resource is also quite comprehensive but does not extend into relativity and quantum mechanics . Refer to the subjects
    Quidquid latine dictum, altum videtur
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    Thanks for your answers

    I also thought of the Landau's tomes and the truth is they are really wide angled and help a lot. However, I wasn't talking about a source of knowledge by itself. I mean, the Landau tomes (if someone has the energy/time/brain/prerequisite knowledge to read ALL of them) would certainly make you a physicist who knew of a wide range of physics, but I'm merely looking for a book about physics and it's branches. It doesn't have to be a book actually, simply a source where you could quickly realise what you "have to" learn. As a physics student after all these courses I cant help but feel that what I've learned are in general separated facts and algorithms and I lack in general understanding. I often find things I don't know in subjects I should know only because I read a textbook different to the one the course was based upon. I also often think about physical phenomena which I can't begin to explain because I don't know in which category they fall.
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    What came up when you Googled your question?
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  7. #6  
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    Sites and links offering a very general dissection of physics in Relativistic, Quantum mechanical, Classical and the like. Ofcourse this is essential for anyone who doesn't know much to get a general idea but as I have mentioned I'm not looking for that. A method, if you like, of not getting lost in specialized or too-general concepts. This doesn't have to come from the same source.
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