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Thread: Fresh mind looking for guidance

  1. #1 Fresh mind looking for guidance 
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    Hello i am going into my last year of HS and i would like opinions on my plan. I have a dream that is completely un-related to my career goals and it will require many years for me to become the person necessary to achieve this dream that hasn't been accomplished by anybody yet, although many have tried. I will become the person to accomplish this dream. It'll require for me to have a good reputation as a scientist, connections, money, and a lot of knowledge. To get there i plan to become someone who will help advance the frontier in space. I would like to be the guy who comes up with designs, tests, and researches in space-related engineering. Be it rockets, satellites, planetary exploration (i.e. Curiosity), and from what i predict to become a strong industry in the next 30 years is the mining of asteroids. To get there is no small feat and choosing the right education is of the up-most importance.

    Now to the point, my plan is this: 2 years in majoring of mechanical engineering and physics. I plan to do this at a local upstanding college for engineering. My goal here is college over university due to time constraints & freedom. While going to college i plan to work on many self-started projects ranging from wood-work to self-teaching myself building electronics as i see that to be a valuable skill. After this i will go traveling for a year to improve on myself. Here i'll build connections for when i start up a company for my dream when i have all the requirements for it.

    After i come back from traveling my next set of education will take me to Toronto as i'm Canadian and wish to help for the space frontier from my home country. I've been told by a few teachers that the University of Toronto is the best for space-related schooling. I'll transfer from my college and major in Astrophysics and Aerospace engineering to understand mechanics and physics not on the ground. Here i can start building connections towards my space-frontier career and start looking for a company to look that fills my interest when it comes to space.
    $ for my education is handled for so student debt isn't an issue. I am a lucky individual in this regard and i plan to use it for the survival of humanity in this frightfully large universe full of the unknown.

    Now what i wish to get from this forum is this: Opinions on my plan, suggestions on hobbies i should take up, books/topics i should research right now on my own time to build my own knowledge reservoir, and if i should look for a joint apprenticeship/schooling so i can make money and learn skills while going to school.

    Any help is much appreciated, thank you.


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    Quote Originally Posted by BigHuestan View Post

    Now what i wish to get from this forum is this: Opinions on my plan, suggestions on hobbies i should take up, books/topics i should research right now on my own time to build my own knowledge reservoir, and if i should look for a joint apprenticeship/schooling so i can make money and learn skills while going to school.

    Any help is much appreciated, thank you.
    This sounds like a good plan. To answer your question: how strong is your math? Especially your linear algebra and your calculus? The reason for asking is that the language of physics is math.
    If you want to have an advantage in your quest, start reading Feynman's "Lectures on Physics", it is the best book to teach yourself physics and can be found free, posted on the internet. If you have the math background, you will have no trouble understanding the underlying physics. If you have trouble understanding the physics, you will need to strengthen your math.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark View Post
    This sounds like a good plan. To answer your question: how strong is your math? Especially your linear algebra and your calculus? The reason for asking is that the language of physics is math.
    If you want to have an advantage in your quest, start reading Feynman's "Lectures on Physics", it is the best book to teach yourself physics and can be found free, posted on the internet. If you have the math background, you will have no trouble understanding the underlying physics. If you have trouble understanding the physics, you will need to strengthen your math.
    I'm starting to read it now. I'll read a chapter a day and take notes for each chapter. I'm very adept at physics math. However my calculus math is weak because my schools math department is the worst part about the school. I've loved math since i was a kid and have a very strong imagination for it. I only need to find a teacher who is qualified to teach math, i'll work on it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigHuestan View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark View Post
    This sounds like a good plan. To answer your question: how strong is your math? Especially your linear algebra and your calculus? The reason for asking is that the language of physics is math.
    If you want to have an advantage in your quest, start reading Feynman's "Lectures on Physics", it is the best book to teach yourself physics and can be found free, posted on the internet. If you have the math background, you will have no trouble understanding the underlying physics. If you have trouble understanding the physics, you will need to strengthen your math.
    I'm starting to read it now. I'll read a chapter a day and take notes for each chapter. I'm very adept at physics math. However my calculus math is weak because my schools math department is the worst part about the school. I've loved math since i was a kid and have a very strong imagination for it. I only need to find a teacher who is qualified to teach math, i'll work on it.
    Try getting a math tutor, quickly.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigHuestan View Post
    I'm very adept at physics math. However my calculus math is weak ...
    I'm a bit concerned about your statement above. Calculus is very much "physics math" so if you are weak at "calculus math" then your "physics math" is similarly weak. I am not aware of any part of even undergraduate physics that doesn't require calculus. Given the pervasive utility of calculus, I second HR's recommendation that you study maths at considerably greater detail than you've done so far. Doing so will reap manifold benefits as you proceed in your studies.

    I wish you the best of luck in your endeavours!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark
    Especially your linear algebra and your calculus? T
    Typically HS students have never heard of linear algebra. I doubt most engineers take it either.
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    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post

    Typically HS students have never heard of linear algebra. I doubt most engineers take it either.
    HS linear algebra is along the lines of y = mx + b and quadratics if that's what you mean. If it is, that has been my weak point in math while the rest of math is comfortably comprehend able.
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    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark
    Especially your linear algebra and your calculus? T
    Typically HS students have never heard of linear algebra.
    Seriously? You are certainly mistaken, it is taught in 10-th, 11-th and 12-th grade.

    I doubt most engineers take it either.
    It is a requirement at the university where I teach.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigHuestan View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post

    Typically HS students have never heard of linear algebra. I doubt most engineers take it either.
    HS linear algebra is along the lines of y = mx + b and quadratics if that's what you mean. If it is, that has been my weak point in math while the rest of math is comfortably comprehend able.
    Get a math tutor. Quickly. Or put your hopes of becoming a physicist on hold until you remedy your math.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark
    Seriously? You are certainly mistaken, it is taught in 10-th, 11-th and 12-th grade.
    Prove that's true for all high schools in the country, if you think you have the ability to. I seriously doubt that's true. Oh, sure. There might be one or two here and there, but certainly not all of them, that's for sure. Linear algebra is the branch of mathematics concerning vector spaces and linear mappings between such spaces. That's not something high school students study? I'm quite puzzled where you ever got such an idea from. I suppose the next thing you're going to tell us is that they study tensor analysis and differential geometry in high school as well, right? Lol!

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark
    It is a requirement at the university where I teach.
    And where is that? I.e. where do you teach? I want to look at the requirements of all engineering majors to verify your claim. You're claiming that it's a requirement for what? What kind of engineer? And so what? That doesn't mean that it's a requirement at all universities. E.g. here are two near me where it doesn't and there very well known and prominent colleges in my area

    See Merrimack College Electrical Egineering requirements
    Major Requirements

    Northeastern University Civil Engineering requirements (2015)
    Major Requirements

    I'm going to contact local high schools to see if you're as accurate there as you are about engineering degrees.
    Last edited by physicist; September 15th, 2014 at 06:08 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark
    Seriously? You are certainly mistaken, it is taught in 10-th, 11-th and 12-th grade.
    Prove that's true for all high schools in the country, if you think you have the ability to. I seriously doubt that's true. Oh, sure. There might be one or two here and there, but certainly not all of them, that's for sure. Linear algebra is the branch of mathematics concerning vector spaces and linear mappings between such spaces. That's not something high school students study? I'm quite puzzled where you ever got such an idea from. I suppose the next thing you're going to tell us is that they study tensor analysis and differential geometry in high school as well, right? Lol!

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark
    It is a requirement at the university where I teach.
    And where is that? I.e. where do you teach? I want to look at the requirements of all engineering majors to verify your claim. You're claiming that it's a requirement for what? What kind of engineer? And so what? That doesn't mean that it's a requirement at all universities. E.g. here are two near me where it doesn't and there very well known and prominent colleges in my area

    See Merrimack College Electrical Egineering requirements
    Major Requirements

    Northeastern University Civil Engineering requirements (2015)
    Major Requirements

    I'm going to contact local high schools to see if you're as accurate there as you are about engineering degrees.
    Considering linear algebra was on the SOL I took... Your requests are also ridiculous.
    "MODERATOR NOTE : We don't entertain trolls here, not even in the trash can. Banned." -Markus Hanke
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    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark
    Seriously? You are certainly mistaken, it is taught in 10-th, 11-th and 12-th grade.
    Nope. I seriously doubt that. Linear algebra is the branch of mathematics concerning vector spaces and linear mappings between such spaces. That's not something high school students study?
    It also contains algebraic structures (groups, rings, etc) as well matrix theory, determinants, solving algebraic equations, vector algebra, transformations. These elements have been taught since the late 1970's in HS. When did you finish high school?

    I'm quite puzzled where you ever got such an idea from. I suppose the next thing you're going to tell us is that they study tensor analysis and differential geometry in high school as well, right? Lol!
    The fact that you did not know any of the HS curriculum is puzzling. You do not need to get so defensive about not knowing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark
    It is a requirement at the university where I teach.
    You're claiming that it's a requirement for what? What kind of engineer? And so what? That doesn't mean that it's a requirement at all universities. E.g. here are two near me where it doesn't and there very well known and prominent colleges in my area
    EE/CS and mechanical. You do not need to get so agitated.



    I'm going to contact local high schools to see if you're as accurate there as you are about engineering degrees.
    Be my guest. You seem to have an inordinate amount of time on your hands. Retired?
    Last edited by Howard Roark; September 15th, 2014 at 06:25 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post
    E.g. here are two near me where it doesn't and there very well known and prominent colleges in my area

    See Merrimack College Electrical Egineering requirements
    Major Requirements

    Northeastern University Civil Engineering requirements (2015)
    Major Requirements
    Both of your links point at Merrimack. You need to slow down and think before posting.
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    Quote Originally Posted by shlunka
    Considering linear algebra was on the SOL I took... Your requests are also ridiculous.[
    What's an SOL? It's far from ridiculous. Even if it was on that SOL you claim to have taken that cannot be taken as any sort of proof that it's a universal requirement. So why don't you demonstrate why what I said is so ridiculous given that I didn't say anything definite like Howard implied? I said I'd check local high schools to see what they do, perhaps look at state requirements too. I already proved to you that not all engineering programs require the course.

    Again, why is it so ridiculous pray tell?

    Actually I don't like the attitudes with which you and Howard responded so I won't be reading posts from either of you again.
    Last edited by physicist; September 15th, 2014 at 07:57 PM.
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    I'm currently doing second year undergraduate physics. I had never seen the term 'Linear Algebra' (except in textbooks beyond my understanding) until the beginning of this year. Now that I understand what it is, I realise that a small portion of it was covered in high school, namely matrices and vectors, but topics like vector spaces or orthogonality or normalisation are new (or at least not formally introduced as linear algebra). From my experience and that of my friends (purely anecdotal, I realise), not every high school student is formally introduced to linear algebra. I'm disappointed that I wasn't taught those concepts in the context of linear algebra from the very beginning, because it's not overly mindbending.

    BigHuestan, your first year maths courses should bring you up to speed with the calculus you need to know. A tutor would be helpful if you're struggling, but I'm not sure it's the life or death situation Howard Roark paints it to be. You sound like a dedicated person so I think you'll manage better than most. Just don't overestimate your ability. If you don't get calculus yet, it won't help to convince yourself you're good at calculus already.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karsus View Post
    I'm currently doing second year undergraduate physics. I had never seen the term 'Linear Algebra' (except in textbooks beyond my understanding) until the beginning of this year. Now that I understand what it is, I realise that a small portion of it was covered in high school, namely matrices and vectors, but topics like vector spaces or orthogonality or normalisation are new (or at least not formally introduced as linear algebra). From my experience and that of my friends (purely anecdotal, I realise), not every high school student is formally introduced to linear algebra. I'm disappointed that I wasn't taught those concepts in the context of linear algebra from the very beginning, because it's not overly mindbending.

    BigHuestan, your first year maths courses should bring you up to speed with the calculus you need to know. A tutor would be helpful if you're struggling, but I'm not sure it's the life or death situation Howard Roark paints it to be. You sound like a dedicated person so I think you'll manage better than most. Just don't overestimate your ability. If you don't get calculus yet, it won't help to convince yourself you're good at calculus already.
    You missed the fact that BigHuestan wants to finish in two years.
    You missed the fact that his knowledge of both algebra and calculus appears weak.
    There is no way he'll come up to speed and finish in two years.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karsus
    I'm currently doing second year undergraduate physics. I had never seen the term 'Linear Algebra' (except in textbooks beyond my understanding) until the beginning of this year. Now that I understand what it is, I realise that a small portion of it was covered in high school, namely matrices and vectors, but topics like vector spaces or orthogonality or normalisation are new (or at least not formally introduced as linear algebra).
    Good man, Karsus. You got what the last two were unable to understand. They were under the false impression that just because a couple of subjects which are taught under linear algebra in high school it doesn't mean that linear algebra is taught in high school. Well done my good man.

    Quote Originally Posted by Karsus
    A tutor would be helpful if you're struggling, but I'm not sure it's the life or death situation Howard Roark paints it to be.
    That's correct. Howard has a bad tendency to do that. It's unfortunate that it happens in a forum where students seek to learn what's really going on and end up so often with false impressions and totally wrong statements.
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    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Karsus
    I'm currently doing second year undergraduate physics. I had never seen the term 'Linear Algebra' (except in textbooks beyond my understanding) until the beginning of this year. Now that I understand what it is, I realise that a small portion of it was covered in high school, namely matrices and vectors, but topics like vector spaces or orthogonality or normalisation are new (or at least not formally introduced as linear algebra).
    Good man, Karsus. You got what the last two were unable to understand. They were under the false impression that just because a couple of subjects which are taught under linear algebra in high school it doesn't mean that linear algebra is taught in high school. Well done my good man.

    Quote Originally Posted by Karsus
    A tutor would be helpful if you're struggling, but I'm not sure it's the life or death situation Howard Roark paints it to be.
    That's correct. Howard has a bad tendency to do that. It's unfortunate that it happens in a forum where students seek to learn what's really going on and end up so often with false impressions and totally wrong statements.
    Well, I happen to have a better education than you, "physicist". Such is life.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Karsus View Post
    I'm currently doing second year undergraduate physics. I had never seen the term 'Linear Algebra' (except in textbooks beyond my understanding) until the beginning of this year. Now that I understand what it is, I realise that a small portion of it was covered in high school, namely matrices and vectors, but topics like vector spaces or orthogonality or normalisation are new (or at least not formally introduced as linear algebra). From my experience and that of my friends (purely anecdotal, I realise), not every high school student is formally introduced to linear algebra. I'm disappointed that I wasn't taught those concepts in the context of linear algebra from the very beginning, because it's not overly mindbending.

    BigHuestan, your first year maths courses should bring you up to speed with the calculus you need to know. A tutor would be helpful if you're struggling, but I'm not sure it's the life or death situation Howard Roark paints it to be. You sound like a dedicated person so I think you'll manage better than most. Just don't overestimate your ability. If you don't get calculus yet, it won't help to convince yourself you're good at calculus already.
    You missed the fact that BigHuestan wants to finish in two years.
    You missed the fact that his knowledge of both algebra and calculus appears weak.
    There is no way he'll come up to speed and finish in two years.
    The way I read it is he wants to spend 2 years at a local college and then transfer to Toronto to finish. Perhaps I misunderstand?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karsus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Karsus View Post
    I'm currently doing second year undergraduate physics. I had never seen the term 'Linear Algebra' (except in textbooks beyond my understanding) until the beginning of this year. Now that I understand what it is, I realise that a small portion of it was covered in high school, namely matrices and vectors, but topics like vector spaces or orthogonality or normalisation are new (or at least not formally introduced as linear algebra). From my experience and that of my friends (purely anecdotal, I realise), not every high school student is formally introduced to linear algebra. I'm disappointed that I wasn't taught those concepts in the context of linear algebra from the very beginning, because it's not overly mindbending.

    BigHuestan, your first year maths courses should bring you up to speed with the calculus you need to know. A tutor would be helpful if you're struggling, but I'm not sure it's the life or death situation Howard Roark paints it to be. You sound like a dedicated person so I think you'll manage better than most. Just don't overestimate your ability. If you don't get calculus yet, it won't help to convince yourself you're good at calculus already.
    You missed the fact that BigHuestan wants to finish in two years.
    You missed the fact that his knowledge of both algebra and calculus appears weak.
    There is no way he'll come up to speed and finish in two years.
    The way I read it is he wants to spend 2 years at a local college and then transfer to Toronto to finish. Perhaps I misunderstand?
    Yes, you misunderstood:

    "Now to the point, my plan is this: 2 years in majoring of mechanical engineering and physics."
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    We'll have to wait for him to reply to clarify. I read it that he was going to do 2 years at his local college, then take a gap year, then transfer to Toronto and change his major to astrophysics.

    I don't think that would be an impossible task, but it does seem irregular. There are accelerated programs that finish in 2 years, if that's what he's doing. Acceptance into those programs would require a minimum level of maths, but I don't see them being much more challenging. The ones at my university condense the first year maths into the summer break. All the same topics are covered, but in a shorter span of time. But if he's picked some engineering/physics double degree, that probably isn't the way he's doing it. Who knows? Hopefully he'll be back soon to discuss.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karsus View Post
    We'll have to wait for him to reply to clarify. I read it that he was going to do 2 years at his local college, then take a gap year, then transfer to Toronto and change his major to astrophysics.

    I don't think that would be an impossible task, but it does seem irregular. There are accelerated programs that finish in 2 years, if that's what he's doing. Acceptance into those programs would require a minimum level of maths, but I don't see them being much more challenging. The ones at my university condense the first year maths into the summer break. All the same topics are covered, but in a shorter span of time. But if he's picked some engineering/physics double degree, that probably isn't the way he's doing it. Who knows? Hopefully he'll be back soon to discuss.
    Well, I see very big issues with his math knowledge. I have two rather different types of students, the ones that have had a lot of math in HS and the ones that have had rather little and hoped to catch up in the university. The former do very well, the latter very rarely, if ever catch up. They don't do well because they have had to strain too much in order to catch up. Students who had their HS outside the US (China,India, Europe) do much better than US students because HS education system in the US is very weak, with rare exceptions.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark View Post
    Well, I see very big issues with his math knowledge. I have two rather different types of students, the ones that have had a lot of math in HS and the ones that have had rather little and hoped to catch up in the university. The former do very well, the latter very rarely, if ever catch up. They don't do well because they have had to strain too much in order to catch up. Students who had their HS outside the US (China,India, Europe) do much better than US students because HS education system in the US is very weak, with rare exceptions.
    Fair enough, I see your point. Canada's high school maths standards may be different to the ones in the US though? Jumping straight to tutoring might be going a bit overboard, unless money really isn't an issue. I know some universities have some tests for "maths you should know before starting uni". I can't remember where I got the one I took years ago, unfortunately. It wasn't the university I currently attend. I'll go hunting and report back. He could ask his local college for suggestions, too.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karsus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark View Post
    Well, I see very big issues with his math knowledge. I have two rather different types of students, the ones that have had a lot of math in HS and the ones that have had rather little and hoped to catch up in the university. The former do very well, the latter very rarely, if ever catch up. They don't do well because they have had to strain too much in order to catch up. Students who had their HS outside the US (China,India, Europe) do much better than US students because HS education system in the US is very weak, with rare exceptions.
    Fair enough, I see your point. Canada's high school maths standards may be different to the ones in the US though?
    Somewhat better but not much. The "equal opportunity" thing is reducing the teaching to the lowest common denominator. There are exceptions but not many.


    Jumping straight to tutoring might be going a bit overboard, unless money really isn't an issue.
    He seems very weak for the goals that he set for himself. He could either get help (pronto) or lower his goals. Either would work.



    I know some universities have some tests for "maths you should know before starting uni". I can't remember where I got the one I took years ago, unfortunately. It wasn't the university I currently attend. I'll go hunting and report back. He could ask his local college for suggestions, too.
    I can tell you that the university I am , the bar is high. Very high. And my classes set the bar much higher, there is no mercy :-)
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    The former do very well, the latter very rarely, if ever catch up.
    I'm an exception to the rule since I did so well in math in college that I still considered the best they've (the math and physics department) seen in last 30 years.
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    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post
    The former do very well, the latter very rarely, if ever catch up.
    I'm an exception to the rule since I did so well in math in college that I still considered the best they've (the math and physics department) seen in last 30 years.
    Your modesty notwithstanding, there is no proof of your above boast.
    We could put the claim to a test, here is a simple exercise. You have a "light clock" ( a light ray bouncing in the vertical direction between two parallel mirrors). You put the clock on a train that moves with constant coordinate acceleration in the horizontal direction with respect to a platform. Derive the equations of motion of the light ray in the frame of the platform. Derive the trajectory of the light ray in the frame of the platform.
    Last edited by Howard Roark; September 16th, 2014 at 09:08 AM.
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    I said I'd find some university maths tests, here are a bunch.

    Here's one. Multiple choice, not ideal, but it has some calculus and it gives feedback.
    Prototype - Page Title

    Here are a whole bunch of admission tests from Oxford. Some of them look pretty tricky, though not a lot of calculus.
    https://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/prospecti.../how-apply/mat

    These ones, from oxford as well, are probably the best looking ones. Only one of the samples has solutions, though.
    https://www2.physics.ox.ac.uk/study-...itude-test-pat


    Also, I'm eager to see the solution to Howard's puzzle. I want to see if my solution is correct. :P
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karsus View Post


    Also, I'm eager to see the solution to Howard's puzzle. I want to see if my solution is correct. :P
    Let's wait for the self-proclaimed all time genius for the last 30 years to post his solution. I am not holding my breath, I very much doubt that he'll solve the puzzle.
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    Sorry i took so long to respond. I'm not too worried about rushing through life. My goals are very long-term. I personally believe that i can learn any skill with time. Howard you remind me of my teachers in elementary school who guffawed at anything not within their standards because i was in a special class. I was born with autism (HF) and natural lucid dreaming (from head injury at a young age, met one other person with this and they had the same incident) which no one has any real idea what it is. Due to these two factors i have had a bit of a challenge when it comes to life. I do not cater to those minds that are set. Set minds do not innovate. After i go to HS i proved them wrong and integrated into classrooms where no one knew i wasn't a normal kid. As i didn't have a proper education in elementary school, highschool was big. I however was able to understand all the things i did not learn in a short period of time even with missing more than a third of my classes. I have no reason to worry about my current math skills that i can improve at any time of my life. Especially when i'm going hard in this final year by showing to every class and fully applying myself. As now is when i have decided to start putting my plans for my dream in motion.
    @Karsus, yeah my schooling is irregular, what i wish to do hasn't been accomplished by anybody to my knowledge.
    It goes like this: College for Physics and Mechanical Engineering/Aerospace Engineering (since i have a connection in the aviation business, seeing how that plays out) until i get my b.a. in both (should be roughly 2 years). After this i will travel for some small-time goals that will take 1-2 years. When i come back i'll transfer to Toronto and move to Astrophysics/Mechanical or Aero depending on which i did first. I'll see how the education plays out after 2 years of uni, who i meet, and if i decide to get into Neurology which i plan to in my late 20's - early 30's.
    What i have that differentiates me from others is imagination.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigHuestan View Post
    Sorry i took so long to respond. I'm not too worried about rushing through life. My goals are very long-term. I personally believe that i can learn any skill with time. Howard you remind me of my teachers in elementary school who guffawed at anything not within their standards because i was in a special class.
    No, I simply tried to help you see the reality. Sorry, I failed.


    I was born with autism (HF) and natural lucid dreaming (from head injury at a young age, met one other person with this and they had the same incident) which no one has any real idea what it is. Due to these two factors i have had a bit of a challenge when it comes to life. I do not cater to those minds that are set. Set minds do not innovate.
    We'll see in a few years, what you have innovated.

    After i go to HS i proved them wrong and integrated into classrooms where no one knew i wasn't a normal kid. As i didn't have a proper education in elementary school, highschool was big. I however was able to understand all the things i did not learn in a short period of time even with missing more than a third of my classes. I have no reason to worry about my current math skills that i can improve at any time of my life.
    We'll see how you do at the test. The proof is in the doing, not in the posturing.


    Especially when i'm going hard in this final year by showing to every class and fully applying myself. As now is when i have decided to start putting my plans for my dream in motion.
    Well, good luck in achieving your goals.
    Last edited by Howard Roark; September 16th, 2014 at 09:18 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigHuestan View Post
    What i have that differentiates me from others is imagination.
    Just a reminder, since you mention you are autistic: Us unimaginative people who have not been able to deliver any innovation in society because of our set ways get kind of sensitive when we have our noses rubbed in it. Your success will come more easily if you can remember that. Good luck.
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    BigHuestan, I think you might be in for a bit of a rude shock once you get to college... Good luck.

    Also, I guess I did misunderstand. Sorry Howard.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigHuestan
    I would like to be the guy who comes up with designs, tests, and researches in space-related engineering. Be it rockets, satellites, planetary exploration (i.e. Curiosity), and from what i predict to become a strong industry in the next 30 years is the mining of asteroids. To get there is no small feat and choosing the right education is of the up-most importance.
    I love this idea and it's something I myself would love to do.

    Quote Originally Posted by BigHuestan
    Now to the point, my plan is this: 2 years in majoring of mechanical engineering and physics. I plan to do this at a local upstanding college for engineering. My goal here is college over university due to time constraints & freedom.
    That'll get you an associates degree. For what you want to do you'll need a BA/BS. Of course that depends on what kind of mixture of physics and aerospace education is best for your future.

    What exactly do you see as the major difference between a college and a university? See
    College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Quote Originally Posted by BigHuestan
    Now what i wish to get from this forum is this: Opinions on my plan, suggestions on hobbies i should take up, books/topics i should research right now on my own time to build my own knowledge reservoir, and if i should look for a joint apprenticeship/schooling so i can make money and learn skills while going to school.

    Any help is much appreciated, thank you.
    If I were you I'd start reading about the history of science and space exploration as well as getting a jump start on your math education. Also call several colleges/university physics and aerospace departments and talk to them about your goals. They'll give you some solid advice.
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by BigHuestan View Post
    What i have that differentiates me from others is imagination.
    Just a reminder, since you mention you are autistic: Us unimaginative people who have not been able to deliver any innovation in society because of our set ways get kind of sensitive when we have our noses rubbed in it. Your success will come more easily if you can remember that. Good luck.

    I'd like to let BigHuestan that I'm not one of those people whom it bothers. To me it's like saying that you're taller than me and as such a better basketball player.
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    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post

    I'm an exception to the rule since I did so well in math in college that I still considered the best they've (the math and physics department) seen in last 30 years.
    Perhaps I haven't noticed, but you don't appear to have made any comments (even negative ones) about the question Howard Roark set in post 26.
    I haven't a clue about the answer but then I don't claim to be a mathematician!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halliday View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post

    I'm an exception to the rule since I did so well in math in college that I still considered the best they've (the math and physics department) seen in last 30 years.
    Perhaps I haven't noticed, but you don't appear to have made any comments (even negative ones) about the question Howard Roark set in post 26.
    I haven't a clue about the answer but then I don't claim to be a mathematician!
    :-)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halliday View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post

    I'm an exception to the rule since I did so well in math in college that I still considered the best they've (the math and physics department) seen in last 30 years.
    Perhaps I haven't noticed, but you don't appear to have made any comments (even negative ones) about the question Howard Roark set in post 26.
    I haven't a clue about the answer but then I don't claim to be a mathematician!
    Howard was being rude so I put him in my ignore list and from now on I won't have anything to do with him.

    If you want me to answer a question that he asked me directly then please send me a PM and we'd do it there only if you promise to keep it private, i.e. in PM.
    Last edited by physicist; September 18th, 2014 at 02:30 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Halliday View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post

    I'm an exception to the rule since I did so well in math in college that I still considered the best they've (the math and physics department) seen in last 30 years.
    Perhaps I haven't noticed, but you don't appear to have made any comments (even negative ones) about the question Howard Roark set in post 26.
    I haven't a clue about the answer but then I don't claim to be a mathematician!


    Howard was being rude so I put him in my ignore list and from now on I won't have anything to do with him. He has been too rude to far too many members for far too long. I know many people who've left because they got tired of being the subject of his bad attitude so I won't be part of his presence here.

    In translation, you have no clue how to solve the puzzle I posed despite you doing " so well in math in college that I still considered (sic!) the best they've (the math and physics department) seen in last 30 years.(sic!)". Your exact words.
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  40. #39  
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    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark
    Especially your linear algebra and your calculus? T
    Typically HS students have never heard of linear algebra. I doubt most engineers take it either.
    No we have, I never took linear algebra though. I've had to take up to Multivariable Calculus and Differential Equations. I may or may not have to take that depending on graduate school.
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  41. #40  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karsus View Post
    I said I'd find some university maths tests, here are a bunch.

    Here's one. Multiple choice, not ideal, but it has some calculus and it gives feedback.
    Prototype - Page Title

    Here are a whole bunch of admission tests from Oxford. Some of them look pretty tricky, though not a lot of calculus.
    https://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/prospecti.../how-apply/mat

    These ones, from oxford as well, are probably the best looking ones. Only one of the samples has solutions, though.
    https://www2.physics.ox.ac.uk/study-...itude-test-pat


    Also, I'm eager to see the solution to Howard's puzzle. I want to see if my solution is correct. :P
    Through question 25. Seem like basic trig, calc, and physics.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndresKiani View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark
    Especially your linear algebra and your calculus? T
    Typically HS students have never heard of linear algebra. I doubt most engineers take it either.
    No we have, I never took linear algebra though.
    I'm sorry but I don't understand what you mean here when you said "No we have". What does that refer to? "no" and "we have" mean opposite things so I'm curious as to what "No we have" means in this context. Who are "we". Are you a high school student? If you're saying that you're a high school student who studied linear algebra then are you saying that you studied linear algebra as defined here
    Linear Algebra -- from Wolfram MathWorld
    Linear algebra is the study of linear sets of equations and their transformation properties. Linear algebra allows the analysis of rotations in space, least squares fitting, solution of coupled differential equations, determination of a circle passing through three given points, as well as many other problems in mathematics, physics, and engineering. Confusingly, linear algebra is not actually an algebra in the technical sense of the word "algebra" (i.e., a vector space over a field , and so on).
    I'm referring to studying vector spaces and all the theorems that go along with them and not merely matrices and systems of equations and how to work with them.

    Thank you.
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    You said most Engineers haven't heard of Linear Algebra, and therefore the ... "No we have was blurted out"

    However, now that I've just reread your comment, and it seems to me you were saying highschool students haven't heard of linear algebra, though disturbingly.. engineers "most" haven't taken linear algebra.

    Ummm... I know I didn't take linear algebra, and its not required for me, as far as engineering school goes. However, I know of Engineers in their graudate school who decided to take it (I'm not sure if it was because they had to, but I know they ended up taking during graduate school).
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    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by AndresKiani View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark
    Especially your linear algebra and your calculus? T
    Typically HS students have never heard of linear algebra. I doubt most engineers take it either.
    No we have, I never took linear algebra though.
    I'm sorry but I don't understand what you mean here when you said "No we have". What does that refer to? "no" and "we have" mean opposite things so I'm curious as to what "No we have" means in this context. Who are "we". Are you a high school student? If you're saying that you're a high school student who studied linear algebra then are you saying that you studied linear algebra as defined here
    Linear Algebra -- from Wolfram MathWorld
    Linear algebra is the study of linear sets of equations and their transformation properties. Linear algebra allows the analysis of rotations in space, least squares fitting, solution of coupled differential equations, determination of a circle passing through three given points, as well as many other problems in mathematics, physics, and engineering. Confusingly, linear algebra is not actually an algebra in the technical sense of the word "algebra" (i.e., a vector space over a field , and so on).
    I'm referring to studying vector spaces and all the theorems that go along with them and not merely matrices and systems of equations and how to work with them.

    Thank you.
    I understand what Linear Algebra is as good as anyone else that hasn't taken the course yet. No need to Wolfram Alpha its definition at me.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndresKiani
    I understand what Linear Algebra is as good as anyone else that hasn't taken the course yet. No need to Wolfram Alpha its definition at me.[
    Since I don't know you I don't know what you do or do not know. In any case I was using that to specify linear algebra in all its aspects as set forth in that page and not necessarily to define what linear algebra is.
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    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by AndresKiani
    I understand what Linear Algebra is as good as anyone else that hasn't taken the course yet. No need to Wolfram Alpha its definition at me.[
    Since I don't know you I don't know what you do or do not know. In any case I was using that to specify linear algebra in all its aspects as set forth in that page and not necessarily to define what linear algebra is.
    The point is that quite a few high schoolers know linear algebra and some high schools offer it in their curriculum. The fact that you didn't learn linear algebra in high school is irrelevant. What is puzzling is your claim that you are the best mathematician/physicist to graduate from your alma mater in the last 30 years. Can you substantiate this claim?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karsus
    I'm currently doing second year undergraduate physics. I had never seen the term 'Linear Algebra' (except in textbooks beyond my understanding) until the beginning of this year. Now that I understand what it is, I realise that a small portion of it was covered in high school, namely matrices and vectors, but topics like vector spaces or orthogonality or normalisation are new (or at least not formally introduced as linear algebra). From my experience and that of my friends (purely anecdotal, I realise), not every high school student is formally introduced to linear algebra. I'm disappointed that I wasn't taught those concepts in the context of linear algebra from the very beginning, because it's not overly mindbending.
    This is precisely what It thought, i.e. that parts of linear algebra were taught but not all of them. When I was in your position I chose to take the course myself and as such I highly recommend that you either take it formally or pick up a good text on the subject and study it thoroughly. You'll be using it a lot in quantum mechanics.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halliday View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post

    I'm an exception to the rule since I did so well in math in college that I still considered the best they've (the math and physics department) seen in last 30 years.
    Perhaps I haven't noticed, but you don't appear to have made any comments (even negative ones) about the question Howard Roark set in post 26.
    I haven't a clue about the answer but then I don't claim to be a mathematician!
    He can't do it, he'll continue talking about other things but he won't touch the puzzle.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by AndresKiani
    I understand what Linear Algebra is as good as anyone else that hasn't taken the course yet. No need to Wolfram Alpha its definition at me.[
    Since I don't know you I don't know what you do or do not know. In any case I was using that to specify linear algebra in all its aspects as set forth in that page and not necessarily to define what linear algebra is.
    The point is that quite a few high schoolers know linear algebra and some high schools offer it in their curriculum. The fact that you didn't learn linear algebra in high school is irrelevant. What is puzzling is your claim that you are the best mathematician/physicist to graduate from your alma mater in the last 30 years. Can you substantiate this claim?
    When did I claim I was the best? Lol I'm hardly the best in any subject.. I'm not smart I work hard for my grades.

    edit:

    I just realize you guys are talking to physicist ... maybe he is as good as he says he is. Give him the benefit of the doubt, at the end of the day we are all students of the sciences.
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  50. #49  
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndresKiani View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Roark View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by physicist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by AndresKiani
    I understand what Linear Algebra is as good as anyone else that hasn't taken the course yet. No need to Wolfram Alpha its definition at me.[
    Since I don't know you I don't know what you do or do not know. In any case I was using that to specify linear algebra in all its aspects as set forth in that page and not necessarily to define what linear algebra is.
    The point is that quite a few high schoolers know linear algebra and some high schools offer it in their curriculum. The fact that you didn't learn linear algebra in high school is irrelevant. What is puzzling is your claim that you are the best mathematician/physicist to graduate from your alma mater in the last 30 years. Can you substantiate this claim?
    When did I claim I was the best? Lol I'm hardly the best in any subject.. I'm not smart I work hard for my grades.

    edit:

    I just realize you guys are talking to physicist ... maybe he is as good as he says he is.
    There is no indication that he is . Besides, he's not modest at all.

    Give him the benefit of the doubt, at the end of the day we are all students of the sciences.
    I did, I gave him a simple exercise to solve. Nothing.
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