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Thread: 23kHz Acoustic Sound Wave

  1. #1 23kHz Acoustic Sound Wave 
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    Hi, juz wan to get some opinion frm u all, ist the 23Khz acoustic wave
    able to distrupt human being audiotory system affect balancing and causing dizziness?


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  3. #2  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
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    No. Otherwise dog whistles would be weapons.


    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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  4. #3  
    ***** Participant Write4U's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    No. Otherwise dog whistles would be weapons.
    They are to dogs. It is a command accompanied by auditory pain. Perhaps there are sound waves which adversely interfere with patterns of thought or are physicaly painful.
    "Art is the creation of that which evokes an emotional response, leading to thoughts of the noblest kind" (W4U)
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  5. #4  
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    It depends on intensity.
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  6. #5  
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    I did see an ad lib experiment once which demonstrated that a steady sound wave at a certain harmonic could produce harmonics in a suspension bridge.

    We know air waves (wind) has brought down several suspension bridges., but their experiment proved that a small repetitive tuned wave can in fact produce harmonics in structures and occasionally cause cause major damage.

    The wave function is so basic to the universe and natural phenomena, that it stands to reason things would be affected by certain frequencies.
    "Art is the creation of that which evokes an emotional response, leading to thoughts of the noblest kind" (W4U)
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  7. #6  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
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    Actually, only very regular objects have the kind of strong resonant frequencies you're talking about. At the scales involved, suspension bridges are pretty regular while humans (and most lifeforms) aren't.
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  8. #7  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard
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    Not a problem for me.
    My hearing craps out above 13kHz
    Extended High Frequency Online Hearing Test | 8-22 kHz
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  9. #8  
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    @MagiMaster,
    Actually, only very regular objects have the kind of strong resonant frequencies you're talking about. At the scales involved, suspension bridges are pretty regular while humans (and most lifeforms) aren't.
    I understand but parts of complex structures may be resonant.

    Some voices can shatter crystal wine glasses. What principle is involved?

    Remarkably, I read that a mother can immediately recognize her baby's cry from among many crying babies.
    "Art is the creation of that which evokes an emotional response, leading to thoughts of the noblest kind" (W4U)
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  10. #9  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
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    A crystal wine glass is very regular. (Crystals, in general, are.) The joints between disparate parts of structures are significant irregularities though and tend to destroy any resonances (often on purpose).

    A mother recognizing a baby's cry isn't an example of resonance though.

    As an example of biological resonance, many creatures that need to communicate over distance develop a resonant vocal cavity to make their calls louder.
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  11. #10  
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    It isn't just the joints in structures that kill resonance. Many construction materials dampen vibrations naturally. Also as MagiMaster says sound transmission is usually prevented deliberately. Nobody wants to be able to hear everything their neighbors are saying through the walls of their homes. The higher frequencies are usually easier to dampen with massiveness and with sound absorbing material.
    Also the periods of large structures are long because of the size and mass of the structure so they are not as likely to be affected by higher frequencies.

    Resonances on large structures like bridges or office towers are usually more of a problem with low frequencies. Winds can cause serious problems.
    Wind moving past large structures can start creating low frequency vibrations.

    Galloping Gertie was an example of what can happen if the design ignores wind effects.
    Tacoma Narrows Bridge (1940) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Impacts can be another source of trouble. Almost every bridge you see today has the joints in the roadway at an angle so car tires don't set up vibrations in the bridge.
    The military used to order troops to break their step when crossing bridges so their cadence would not set up resonant vibrations as well.
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  12. #11  
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    I bet simple harmonic motion involves in all that incident, atoms or molecules gain energy from oscillating kinetic wave with certain frequency,
    until those atoms have sufficient energy to cause breaking n damage.
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  13. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by squallvalentine View Post
    I bet simple harmonic motion involves in all that incident, atoms or molecules gain energy from oscillating kinetic wave with certain frequency,
    until those atoms have sufficient energy to cause breaking n damage.
    I think you might mean heating.
    In that case, I suppose you could used high frequency sound to heat some parts of a structure, but that is what it would look like, heating instead of breaking.
    It seems like it would be a very inefficient way of doing it even if you just consider the transmission losses through air. If you add the effect of the structure reflecting instead of absorbing the sound the transfer of energy to the structure is much worse.
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