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Thread: Smallest object with a disproportionate weight.

  1. #1 Smallest object with a disproportionate weight. 
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    i am extremely sorry for the terrible wording. I truthfully have no idea how to describe an object like this other than giving an example.
    Example: Lets say there is a marble made of some type of metal, and the marble being no smaller and no larger than the size of lets say an eyeball, has the weight of 200 pounds.

    With that example out there, what is another object with this type of difference in weight and size.


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    The densest element on earth is Indium at 22.65 grams per cubic centimeter, which isn't anywhere near a 200 pound marble, but in a neutron star, the gravity compresses matter to a much higher density.
    Neutron star - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    A normal-sized matchbox containing neutron star material would have a mass of approximately 5 billion tonnes.


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    Forum Masters Degree Implicate Order's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by redapple46 View Post
    With that example out there, what is another object with this type of difference in weight and size.
    Hi redapple46. What you are referring to is an object's density where you divide an object's mass by its volume. The density relates to an object's mass concentration. Look here.

    The densest objects in the universe are thought to be the neutron star where the pressure of gravity associated with the collapse of a star of a given mass (less than that required to overcome neutron degeneracy pressure ) has reduced the volume of that star to a limit where the final obstacle to complete collapse (neutron degeneracy pressure) prevents further gravitational collapse creating what is referred to as a black hole. Have a look here relating to this example.

    Edit: Harold beat me to the punch........
    Last edited by Implicate Order; July 25th, 2014 at 08:23 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    The densest element on earth is Indium at 22.65 grams per cubic centimeter
    That's interesting, I'd have assumed that something like Uranium would have a higher density to to having a higher atomic number.

    But I guess you also need to take into account the spacing of the atoms in the substance? Indium atoms are packed closer together than Uranium atoms in a space of the same volume?
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    Genius Duck Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    The densest element on earth is Indium at 22.65 grams per cubic centimeter
    Er, SECOND densest: 22.56 g/cm3 for iridium and 22.59 g/cm3 for osmium.
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    Forum Professor Daecon's Avatar
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    Ah, yes. According to Wikipedia...

    Quote Originally Posted by Osmium
    Osmium has a blue-gray tint and is the densest stable element, slightly denser than iridium.
    Quote Originally Posted by Iridium
    The measured density of iridium is only slightly lower (by about 0.12%) than that of osmium, the densest element known.
    Also, Indium and Iridium are different. I'd never heard of Indium before. But to be fair, certain typefaces do make an "ri" look like an "n".
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