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Thread: instanous velocity elastacity

  1. #1 instanous velocity elastacity 
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    A stone of mass 5 g is projected with a rubber catapult. If the catapult is streched through a distance of 7 cm by an average force of 70 N, calculate the instantaneous velocity of the stone when released.


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    This sounds like a homework question. Whether it actually is or not, you won't get an actual answer because of that. However, if you post what work you've already done, we can try and point out whether or not you've made any errors.


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    Set it up first, and then we will tell you if you are on the right track.
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    Quote Originally Posted by chikis View Post
    A stone of mass 5 g is projected with a rubber catapult. If the catapult is streched through a distance of 7 cm by an average force of 70 N, calculate the instantaneous velocity of the stone when released.
    We are not here to solve your homework but I will help you, the potential energy of the stretched band is . You have now all the information necessary to do your homework.
    Last edited by Howard Roark; March 27th, 2014 at 11:43 AM.
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiMaster View Post
    This sounds like a homework question. Whether it actually is or not, you won't get an actual answer because of that. However, if you post what work you've already done, we can try and point out whether or not you've made any errors.
    What exactly is instanous velocity?How do I relate elasticity and instaneous velocity. Where do I start my relation from?
    Last edited by chikis; March 27th, 2014 at 10:13 PM.
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    Is your space bar broken?
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    Quote Originally Posted by chikis View Post
    v = 31 m/s
    Close enough, aren't you able to do symbolic calculations?
    Last edited by Howard Roark; March 27th, 2014 at 05:03 PM.
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    My question to you pals is this, 'What exactaly is instanous velocity?' How do I relate it to this question?
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  10. #9  
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    Instantaneous velocity is the derivative of position at a given point in time.

    BTW, your post #5 is completely unreadable. I'd like to be more helpful, but if there's another question or some mistake buried in there, I wouldn't know.
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiMaster View Post
    Instantaneous velocity is the derivative of position at a given point in time. BTW, your post #5 is completely unreadable. I'd like to be more helpful, but if there's another question or some mistake buried in there, I wouldn't know.
    Go back and check. I have edited it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by chikis View Post
    My question to you pals is this, 'What exactaly is instanous velocity?' How do I relate it to this question?
    If you measure the position of an object at two points in time, you can find the average velocity by dividing the distance traveled by the time elapsed. You can make the time interval smaller and smaller, and as it approaches zero, it will become "instantaneous." Have you taken calculus?
    It relates to the question because as soon as the projectile leaves the slingshot, it starts to change speed due to friction, gravity or other forces. The question relates to the velocity at the instant it leaves the slingshot.
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