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Thread: Pelitier effect

  1. #1 Pelitier effect 
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    What is Pelitier effect?


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  3. #2  
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    It's the exact opposite of the Seebeck effect!

    Oh and it's spelt Peltier.


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  4. #3  
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    Interesting. You learn something new every day.

    http://www.abc.net.au/science/k2/homework/s95611.htm
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  5. #4  
    Forum Senior anand_kapadia's Avatar
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    well i browsed the site but i found it just as seeback effect. Can anybody explain me the difference.
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  6. #5  
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    The Peltier effect is the reverse of the Seebeck effect; a creation of a heat difference from an electric voltage.

    It occurs when a current is passed through two dissimilar metals or semiconductors (n-type and p-type) that are connected to each other at two junctions (Peltier junctions). The current drives a transfer of heat from one junction to the other: one junction cools off while the other heats up; as a result, the effect is often used for thermoelectric cooling.
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  7. #6 Okay...... 
    Forum Professor leohopkins's Avatar
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    Okay...first time ive ever heard of this. it seems really fascinating !!

    How and why does this work ? anyone know ??

    It could be used in microprocessor's yes ? And you'd have the side that gets hot, chanelled into a heatpipe from the main motherboard towards a fan carrying the heat away while the cool junctions sit on the processor itself, cooling it down. ? Has anyone thought of this ?
    The hand of time rested on the half-hour mark, and all along that old front line of the English there came a whistling and a crying. The men of the first wave climbed up the parapets, in tumult, darkness, and the presence of death, and having done with all pleasant things, advanced across No Man's Land to begin the Battle of the Somme. - Poet John Masefield.

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  8. #7  
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    i raised this question because in the company where i work, i had to present this to a customer and I had no idea what it was because somebody spelled it wrong and i couldnt find it ont he net. we use it here to built a kind of a fridge for large batteries, to cool them down, and extend the life of a battery, there are also normal house/kitchen fridges built on this principle. we use it for small power air conditioning system, because it si simpler than a normal air conditioning system.
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  9. #8 Re: Okay...... 
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    Quote Originally Posted by leohopkins
    Okay...first time ive ever heard of this. it seems really fascinating !!

    How and why does this work ? anyone know ??

    It could be used in microprocessor's yes ? And you'd have the side that gets hot, chanelled into a heatpipe from the main motherboard towards a fan carrying the heat away while the cool junctions sit on the processor itself, cooling it down. ? Has anyone thought of this ?
    It's wellcovered in Wiki - Seebeck effect.
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  10. #9 Re: Okay...... 
    Forum Sophomore Kabooom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leohopkins
    Okay...first time ive ever heard of this. it seems really fascinating !!

    How and why does this work ? anyone know ??

    It could be used in microprocessor's yes ? And you'd have the side that gets hot, chanelled into a heatpipe from the main motherboard towards a fan carrying the heat away while the cool junctions sit on the processor itself, cooling it down. ? Has anyone thought of this ?
    People do use Peltiers in computer cooling, but they're very inefficient. The hot side also has to have to heat removed if you want the cold side the keep moving heat. Colder the hot side the better it moves heat to it. Liquid nitrogen and phase change (I think that's what they are) coolers work much better for extreme cooling.
    WHAT?!
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