Notices
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Using electrolysis in scuba diving

  1. #1 Using electrolysis in scuba diving 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    5
    I am thinking of using electrolysis method in gaining the oxygen while scuba diving. The electrolysis will separate the hydrogen and oxygen . Then, the oxygen is take in or pump in to the diver to be used. Is it able to be use ? I read some comment about this topic. It says the the oxygen that we take in from the electrolysis is able to give out oxygen that containing toxic. But , if we use the oxygen tank, it could also give the same hazard which is oxygen toxic hazard (reference : Diving cylinder - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ) .


    While scuba diving using the cylinder tank or oxygen tank, the weight of the tank is very heavy which is quite difficult to dive easily. If we use this electrolysis method , it might be easier because what we need is the electrode and generator or electric supplier such as battery to make the electrolysis happens.

    Is there any scientist already think or created this ? If there is , why can't be use nowadays ? Is the oxygen tank better or this method better ?

    Please just comment anything .


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3,440
    Two things that spring to mind are: electrolysis is very energy-expensive (which means big, heavy batteries), and electrolysizing (?) salt water gives chlorine gas in addition the oxygen and hydrogen.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    5
    aren't the salt water can be use for easier the process of electrolysizing ? it will react with the electrode right to produce a faster process. ??
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Key West, Florida, Earth
    Posts
    4,789
    I've got a better idea why not use a re breather? They do not give off bubbles and they last over 6 hours plus you don't need to decompress. Here are a few available for anyone to buy or you can rent them at certain dive shops.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=rebr...2&ved=0CCQQsxg
    When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.
    Jimi Hendrix
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Genius Duck Moderator Dywyddyr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Scunthorpe, UK
    Posts
    10,689
    Quote Originally Posted by vehanwien View Post
    While scuba diving using the cylinder tank or oxygen tank, the weight of the tank is very heavy which is quite difficult to dive easily.
    Er, the bottle is only heavy until you get in the water.
    And, once in the water is of negligible "weight" - so negligible that weight belts are required to make sure that can stay under.

    I'd imagine that any power source capable of producing sufficient oxygen on demand through electrolysis would be FAR heavier than a typical oxygen bottle.
    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Anti-Crank AlexG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2,810
    Further, the oxygen would have to be pressurized or it wouldn't be breathable.
    Its the way nature is!
    If you dont like it, go somewhere else....
    To another universe, where the rules are simpler
    Philosophically more pleasing, more psychologically easy
    Prof Richard Feynman (1979) .....

    Das ist nicht nur nicht richtig, es ist nicht einmal falsch!"
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Genius Duck Moderator Dywyddyr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Scunthorpe, UK
    Posts
    10,689
    Dang!
    I forgot that.
    Yup.
    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3,440
    Quote Originally Posted by vehanwien View Post
    aren't the salt water can be use for easier the process of electrolysizing ? it will react with the electrode right to produce a faster process. ??
    That sentence is very hard to understand, but if you're asking what I think you're asking then yes, but you wouldn't want to use sodium chloride as the electrolyte (which is what's in sea water).

    Electrolysis of water - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Chloralkali process - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    16,539
    Quote Originally Posted by MagiMaster View Post
    electrolysis is very energy-expensive (which means big, heavy batteries)
    You could use solar cells.
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3,440
    I suppose, but the deeper you go, the larger they'd need to be. I imagine they'd be more useful to a submersible than to a scuba diver. (I haven't done any math on this, so I don't really have any idea how big they'd actually be.)
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Diving in
    By LuciDreaming in forum Introductions
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: May 15th, 2013, 02:52 AM
  2. Electrolysis
    By mattforscience in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: March 14th, 2012, 08:25 AM
  3. Learning is ‘Scuba with a Lamp’
    By coberst in forum Philosophy
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: September 3rd, 2008, 12:13 PM
  4. Sky diving from an altitude of 40 km
    By icewendigo in forum Mechanical, Structural and Chemical Engineering
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: May 27th, 2008, 01:41 PM
  5. High altitude sky diving...
    By Ninjurai Josh in forum Physics
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: June 7th, 2006, 05:11 PM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •