Notices
Results 1 to 5 of 5
Like Tree2Likes
  • 2 Post By Strange

Thread: Why Might Static Objects Redshift?

  1. #1 Why Might Static Objects Redshift? 
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    3
    Because this is considered astrophysics, I was unsure whether to post this under 'Astronomy' or 'Physics', so it just ended up here. So anyway, I understand that this kind of change in energy is due to movement, like how a siren sounds higher pitched as it passes by you, but is there a way that a static [ or stationary ] object might experience a shift towards the red?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    73
    Not like I would be able to answer, but I would like to understand what exactly you're asking.

    Your question could use a bit more clarity, and I'm going to take a wildguess and suppose that redshift does not mean what you think it means.


    If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.
    A.E
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    17,036
    Quote Originally Posted by TWDtSoM View Post
    Because this is considered astrophysics, I was unsure whether to post this under 'Astronomy' or 'Physics', so it just ended up here. So anyway, I understand that this kind of change in energy is due to movement, like how a siren sounds higher pitched as it passes by you, but is there a way that a static [ or stationary ] object might experience a shift towards the red?
    It would appear redshifted if it were in a higher gravitational field than the observer.

    Of if it were stationary and the observer were receding.

    Or if it were at a significant cosmological distance (that redshift is due to the difference in scale factor, not relative velocity; the apparent recessional velocity is also due to change in scale factor).
    Implicate Order and tachyon1 like this.
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    3
    Thank you, I don't know why the idea of the observer receding escaped me, but I can sort of see why particularly high gravitational fields might affect energy. [ Because of the warping of spacetime, right? ]
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Quagma SpeedFreek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    2,787
    You can think of gravitational redshift (and blueshift!) like this:

    Light is stretched (redshifted) as it climbs out of a gravitational well, and is compressed (blueshifted) as it falls into a gravitational well.

    So, if you look at the light coming from a deeper gravitational well than the one you are in, the light will be redshifted. But if you are looking at the light coming from a shallower gravitational well than you are in, the light will be blueshifted.
    "Ok, brain let's get things straight. You don't like me, and I don't like you, so let's do this so I can go back to killing you with beer." - Homer
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Could any of the following (...) cause static in speakers?
    By geekish in forum Electrical and Electronics
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: December 28th, 2010, 12:37 PM
  2. Static Electricity
    By sunsheer in forum Electrical and Electronics
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: June 20th, 2009, 10:01 AM
  3. A static universe.
    By Cyberia in forum Astronomy & Cosmology
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: November 13th, 2008, 10:01 AM
  4. Static electricity on the Moon
    By Everlasting in forum Astronomy & Cosmology
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: May 2nd, 2007, 12:17 AM
  5. Static Light...
    By IrishStu in forum Physics
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: January 10th, 2006, 11:32 PM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •